The Briefly for May 20, 2020 – The “What to Do if You Find a Baby Bird” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Long Island beaches shut out city residents, Peter Luger’s opens for delivery, delivery by drag queens, Magnolia and the MTA start using UVC lights, & more

Today – Low: 48˚ High: 63˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

After cancelation, reinstatement, appeal, and a rejection the June 23 presidential primary is officially back. This means an additional 615 in-person poll sites, 22 early voting poll sites, and 4,617 poll workers will be required. This is also a reminder that you can and should vote absentee this year. Here’s how. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The Chrysler Building applied to the Landmarks Preservation Commission to add an observation deck on the 61st floor. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

177,700 students will be attending virtual summer school this year. It’s been a tough year for students, so comparing this year’s numbers to any year in the past is not an apples-to-apples comparison, but this is the highest number of students in history. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

What to do if you find a baby bird. Hint: its parents won’t smell you on them. (Beth Skwarecki for Lifehacker)

“My fingernails are breaking, I’ve got hangnails, I’ve been getting my nails done for 14 years … I’m very much into yoga, I can’t go to my Bikram yoga studios, I can’t go get my eyelashes done, I can’t go and socialize with the people that are my friends. It’s led me to depression, it’s made me not feel sexual — I mean it’s awful.” This is a real quote from someone protesting outside a barbershop in Williamsburg, but the protestors were sparse mostly from out of state. If you’re looking for a barbershop to avoid, it’s the Beard Barberia Cut and Shave on the corner of Grand Street, who organized the protest (which drew six!!! people) with the pro-Trump group Liberate America, whose organizer was arrested in 2017 for allegedly jerking off in the back seat of an Uber in CA. (Kevin Dugan for Brooklyn Paper)

This year’s virtual pride celebration’s grand marshals are the Ali Forney Center, Dan Levy, showrunner and star of “Schitt’s Creek,” Yanzi Peng, executive director of LGBT Rights China, and Victoria Cruz, a queer rights activist. (Paul Schindler for Gay City News)

The mayor announced the city’s heatwave plan, which includes air conditioners for NYCHA and low-income homes, electricity subsidies, misting oases in parks, and open fire hydrants on certain blocks. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Nearly 70% of offices were open concept, what will offices look like when they reopen? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Have you been in a car around the city lately? It’s very weird. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

It’s amazing what a bit of yarn on a fence can do to lift your spirits. A look at the yarn bombing in East Harlem. (Roger Clark for NY1)

Momofuku announced that Ssäm Bar will be moving from the East Village to the Wayō space in Manhattan’s Seaport District. David Chang’s restaurants have chosen increasingly more touristy areas for its restaurants since Trump-supporting billionaire Stephen Ross came on board in 2016. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Peter Luger is offering take-out and delivery for the first time ever. If you’ve been clamoring for food from the restaurants that recently received a zero-star rating from NY Times’s Pete Wells, here’s your chance. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Today (Wednesday) is the Naming The Lost: A 24 Hour COVID Vigil, a 24-hour virtual vigil that starts at 2 pm to provide an opportunity for collective mourning as the number of deaths reaches for 100,000. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Mayor Bill de Blasio will press the state to approve line-of-duty benefits for families of city workers killed by the coronavirus. The mayor wants the benefits to expand beyond first responders, which is the current limit of federal legislation. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

A weekend project: make Shake Shack’s cheese sauce at home. (Claire Lower for Lifehacker)

Nine hospitals in the city are about to begin allowing visitors again in a test program as Covid-19 is showing signs of abatement. There will be restrictions, but to those who have been in the hospital during this pandemic, I’m sure that any friendly face would be a welcome one. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Five of the most cringe-worthy excerpts from President Trump’s talk with NYC restaurant owners. Thomas Keller from Per Se is kissing the president’s ass so hard these moments he should be embarrassed. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Fresco’s Cantina in Astoria is putting a new spin on delivery with its new “DRAG-livery” service, which involves sending drag queens out to deliver food and perform. The service is an additional $15 on top of a food order. (NY1)

A look at David Bowie’s favorite NYC sandwiches. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Magnolia Bakery’s locations on the Upper West Side and in the West Village are experimenting with new ultraviolet lights that supposedly kill airborne virus particles as people enter the bakery. The light will be in addition to every other protective measure that has been put in place. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Magnolia isn’t the only one getting in on UV lights, the MTA announced it is launching a three-week pilot program using UVC lights, which has been used to disinfect buses in Shanghai. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If your plan was to hear out to Long Island this weekend because the city’s beaches will be closed, tough shit because Long Island’s beaches will be off-limits to city residents. (Marcus Navarro for Politico)

Taste Of Persia, the Persian restaurant once inside a pizza place in Flatiron, is reopening as a delivery-only business. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Why hasn’t Dr. Oxiris Barbot been at the forefront of the city’s communication with the public? The root of the problem seems to be the mayor, who has had a tense history with his Health Department. (J. David Goodman and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Where to find NYC’s best bread delivery right now. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

NYU is planning on allowing students back on campus for the fall semester. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

13% of the city’s nearly 10,000 corrections officers have caught Covid-19. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

Being a fan of the Knicks is fun because every year the Knicks try something new or hire new people and still manage to produce the same garbage results. The Knicks’ latest move is hiring Frank Zanin as an assistant general manager. The Knicks are 67-163 under their current general manager, so Zanin has a tough road ahead of him whenever the NBA starts up again. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Health inspectors are two months into a hiatus on examining local restaurants still open for takeout during the coronavirus pandemic. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Where to get Chinese takeout and delivery. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Emma for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 15, 2020 – The “New Yorkers, Known Historically for Their Patience” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Nine things New Yorkers will judge you for, adoptees can see their original birth certificates, the three remaining four star restaurants in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 52˚
Clear throughout the day.

Op-Ed: Public Advocate Jumaane Williams on how knee-jerk reactions have drowned out common sense conversation and reform when it comes to desegregating the city’s schools when it comes to the gifted and talented program. (Jumaane Williams for amNewYork Metro)

If a fire breaks out in your apartment and you flee, make sure to close the door behind you. An open door turned a one apartment fire into multi-hour ordeal that left 22 people injured in an Upper West Side high-rise. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

An off-duty Secret Service agent shot and killed a dog in Brooklyn early Tuesday morning, claiming the dog was “unleashed and aggressive,” despite photos form the scene showing a leash peeking out from under a white sheet. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The mayor is urging patience when it comes to the BQE panel report, saying last week’s leak of the report was only partial and everyone should “see the whole thing and judge when we all get to look at it.” Yes, New York City is known for its patience and ability to wait before jumping to a conclusion. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

Next month McNally Jackson is set to open a new store in CityPoint in Downtown Brooklyn. (Craig Hubert for Brownstoner)

A guerrilla art installation using decommissioned railroad corridor in Queens is meant to question the ongoing cycle of building, abandonment and redevelopment looming over the city. Railroad Eraser by Aaron Asis highlights the unused corridor with white paint on the tracks. While temporary, it’ll be there until the area is redeveloped. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Stop eating sad salads. How to game the salad bar at lunch, from 11 hefts and food writers. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Nine things New Yorkers will judge tourists for and nine things they won’t. Wearing flip-flops and eating bagels at Dunkin making the “judging” list, as I’m pretty sure they are both classified as misdemeanors in Manhattan. (Mary Lane for New York Cliche)

Prospect Park’s Concert Grove Pavilion is getting a $2 million renovation. The pavilion was designed by Calvert Vaux, one of the park’s original architects, and has been roped off from the public since 2014 due to structural issues. Along with the renovation, the “Oriental Pavilion” is likely to be renamed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Starting today, adoptees in the state who are over 18 can request their previously sealed original birth certificates. The law was passed by the state’s legislature and signed in November, making New York the 10th state with unrestricted access to birth certificates. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The city is sending a 24-person team to Puerto Rico to assist in the relief efforts following almost 2,000 earthquakes since December 28. The team heading down are building inspectors, engineers, emergency managers, and mental health professionals. The governor also sent a team and personally went to survey the damage as well. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A tale of two diners (and a competitive review) in Clinton Hill. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A man walked into a Sunday mass in Brooklyn and doused the priest and altar with bright red juice. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Liquiteria, which claimed to be the city’s first cold-pressed juice bar, closed all five NYC locations abruptly and have all but disappeared online. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Bronx saw the highest wage jump in the state from the second quarter of 2018 to second quarter of 2019 with a 5.7% increase. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics report doesn’t indicate a reason, but the state’s minimum wage increases probably have something to do with it. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s newest celebrity is the Staten Island Bus Raccoon, who tried to jump aboard an S44 bus and being thwarted by some closed doors. The NYPD relocated the raccoon. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Turn back the clock with 20 photos of the city form the 1920s. (Lucie Levine for 6sqft)

The MTA is taking issue with the report that says 4/5 commutes in 2019 we’re delayed due to signal issues. They’ve not refuted the data, instead saying “the devil is in the details.” Technically, 78% of commutes delayed isn improvement from 2018’s 92%. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Six New York City corrections officers were arrested on Tuesday in connection to a drug-smuggling ring on Rikers Island. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Is it the year of glowing seesaws? The city’s second set of glowing seesaws have been set up next to Pier 17, each making unique sounds. The seesaws will be at Pier 17 through March. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

What’s the oldest bar in Brooklyn? It’s a complicated answer. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Perhaps inspired by yesterday’s Mama’s Too meatball parm news, Robert Sietsema has declared where you can find his favorite meatball parm in the city at Faicco’s Italian Specialties•. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Rockefeller Center may be headed for a renovation, depending if owner Tichman Speyer can get approval from the landmarks commission. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

How New York became Gotham City from Joker‘s production designer Mark Friedberg. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The cottage where Edgar Allan Poe wrote “Annabel Lee” and “The Bells” is in the Bronx. The Edgar Allan Poe Cottage was built in 1812 and is at 2640 Grand Concourse, where Poe lived in 1846 with his wife and mother-in-law. (Ariel Kates for GVSHP)

A book that Anthony Bourdain was working on before his death with co-author Laurie Woolever will be published on October 13. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Congress approved a measure last month to reinstate two-way tolls on the Verrazzano, but the MTA has announced no set date for the change to happen. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The City owns most of the land adjacent to the Coney Island boardwalk and leases it to Zamperla, who operates Luna Park and leases to shops and places to eat on the boardwalk like Lola Star, Nathan’s, Ruby’s, Tom’s Restaurant, and the Coney Island Beach Shop. Zamperla is trying to raise rents between 50 and 400% for the independent businesses. When the Times attempted to reach Zamperla officials for comment, they were vacationing in Italy. (Aaron Randle for NY Times)

The water main that played havoc with the Upper Wets Side and Monday morning’s subway commutes was 98 years old. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Ahead of his anticipated Hall of Fame induction, two Bronx City Councilmembers are introducing legislation to rename East 161st Street as “Jeter Street.” (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Pete Wells from the Times knocked Sushi Nakazawa from four stars to three, leaving only three restaurants in the city with four stars, Jean-Georges, Le Bernardin, and Eleven Madison Park. (Sara Boinsteel for NY Times)

Brooklyn’s best ramen restaurants. (Julien Levy for Thrillist)

The Briefly for January 3, 2020 – The “Your Choice of Subway Seat is Always Wrong” Edition

Today’s daily NY news digest: The weekend’s subway changes, sales in Trump buildings fall behind the rest of the city, revisiting Di Fara pizza, Manhattan’s hottest restaurants and more

Today – Low: 45˚ High: 49˚
Light rain until morning, starting again in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 34˚ High: 52˚

Lance at Subway Weekender has retired his blog detailing the weekend’s subway delays. I’m working on either finding a replacement or doing this work myself. In the meantime, check the MTA’s giant list of everything happening to avoid being stranded by the trains this weekend.

Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero is modeled on a Swedish approach that views all deaths as preventable. If that’s the case why did the deaths of pedestrians, motorists, and cyclists increase in 2019? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

There’s an unlikely place to find the city’s history: postcards. (John Freeman Gill for NY Times)

What is the best subway seat? This meme lasted less than a day before de Blasio and Bloomberg ruined the fun. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The Times has the best answer. Your answer is obviously wrong. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

A record collection that rivals the one maintained by the Library of Congress sits in Tribeca needs a new home. (Derek K. Norman for NY Times)

David Hay, the deputy chief of staff to schools Chancellor Richard Carranza, was fired after he was arrested for allegedly trying to arrange sex with an underage boy online. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

Turns out David Hay, hired by the Department of Education, never received a completed background investigation. The Department of Investigation’s Background Investigation Unit has backlog of thousands of files. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

6 crucial ways New York City’s landscape will change in 2020. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Cardell Gadsden, a corrections officer from Rikers Island, was arrested after he allegedly murdered his uncle Steven Gadsden on the Upper West Side on Thursday. Gadsden was suspended without pay. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The 79th Street Boat Basin is the only spot in the city where houseboats can dock year-round. At the moment there’s room for 33 boats and there is a 14-year waitlist for a lease. The Department of Parks is planning a $90 million renovation to triple capacity with construction starting late 2021 or early 2022. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The city’s laws require employers to provide employees with lactation areas, but that doesn’t seem to matter to the NYPD, according to a new lawsuit. Five women are suing the NYPD for forcing them to pump breast-milk in rooms full of garbage bed bugs, their cars, and bathrooms. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Lasagna. Is this really going to be 2020’s food trend? We can survive anything after the 2019 horny chicken parm craze. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Video: Think you’ve got what it takes to keep up with a Rockette? You don’t. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Following a rash of anti-Semitic violence in recent weeks, Brooklyn elected officials are calling for dialogue and camaraderie between the borough’s black and Jewish populations. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Brooklyn House of Detention officially closed on Thursday. The remaining 390 detainees moved to other facilities, including Rikers Island. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Ok Kang, 70, is the first pedestrian in the city killed by a driver in 2020 on Northern Boulevard, the “New Boulevard of Death.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A man was caught on video literally trying to grab a sleeping woman on the subway and carry her off the train. The man, Sonny Alloway, was arrested and claims to have been attacked on the street multiple times since the video went public and offered $5,000 to anyone who attacked him if they can knock him out in a boxing match. For $5,000 I might consider giving it a try! (Brooklyn Baldwin for The Root)

The annoyances and adoration of Di Fara pizza. (Michael Fiorito for Red Hook Star-Revue)

All buses on the B44 SBS route are now equipped with the transit agency’s new Automated Bus Lane Enforcement system, issuing fines to cars caught illegally in the bus lane. Doesn’t it defeat the purpose of the system if the MTA announces that its use is limited to the B44, M14, and M15? (Scott Unman for Brooklyn Eagle)

The NY Post continues to be the NY Post. Offensive, exploitative, and I am 100% here for Gothamist shitting on the worst publication in the city. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

NY Yankees Pitcher Domingo German will miss 63 games after accepting a suspension for allegedly assaulting his girlfriend last September. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

NYC Ferry’s ridership was up by 32% in 2019. The increase includes the new Lower East Side and Soundview routes. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

Farrell’s Bar and Grill is one of Brooklyn’s oldest bars, dating back to 1933. The biggest change might be the bar’s signature styrofoam cups gave way when the city banned them. Two Brooklynites are raising funds to produce a documentary about the bar that hasn’t changed despite the changes to the city around it. (Scott Unman for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Sales at Trump-branded condos continue to fall behind the rest of Manhattan. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The hottest restaurants in Manhattan, January 2020 edition. (Stefanie Tuder and Serena Dai for Eater)