The Briefly for September 21, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, Brooklyn Promenade Might Be Closing, and More

BQE construction could shut down the Brooklyn Promenade for years, Battery Park could get a Hurricane Maria memorial, NYC’s only private island, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Before you go anywhere this weekend, check out the changes to the subway. The 2 and M lines look to be especially bad, the L is running, the G is partially running, and the D train is sometimes an A and sometimes an F.

The Brooklyn Promenade could close for six years in order to accommodate construction on the BQE. During construction, the BQE would be elevated to where the promenade currently sits. The promenade would be rebuilt afterwards. The project will cost over $3 billion.

September 22 (Saturday) is Free Museum Day in New York, you can reserve a pair of tickets at one of over two dozen museums throughout the state.

80 Flatbush was unanimously approved by the City Council after undergoing changes to make the project smaller. The next step for the development is seeking Uniform Land Use Review Procedure approval.

One of the city’s top school districts is removing admissions standards in an attempt to diversify the student body. 55% of middle school age students in the district are black or Latino, but 81% of the students in the schools are white. Mayor de Blasio and School Chancellor Richard Carranza approved the plan, which The New York Times points out was not de Blasio’s idea.

Ten elevated parks and gardens across the city from Untapped Cities.

The cost of housing the city’s homeless population has increased. The city is spending $117 a day to house a single adult this year compared to $99 last year. A lack of permanent solutions is being partially blamed for the increase.

The Archdiocese of New York hired Barbara Jones to review its procedures for dealing with the ongoing crisis of clergy sexual-abuse allegations. Jones just finished up the Michael Cohen case two weeks ago. The archdiocese has already paid out $60 million to victims.

If you’ve got a transit nerd in your life the New York Transit Museum’s 25th annual Bus Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park in October.

The Museum of Natural History is starting work on the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation despite a lawsuit by Community United to Save Theodore Roosevelt Park (CUSTR?) aimed at stopping the construction. The lawsuit states the construction would “cause catastrophic environmental damage to the area, posing a series of life threatening hazards.”

Meet the man who owns the only private island in New York City.

Police chief James O’Neill claims that the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights plans to bail out all 16 and 17-year-olds and bail-eligible women from city jails will make the city less safe.

Brooklyn’s first medical marijuana dispensary, Citiva, is opening across the street from the Barclays Center.

Governor Cuomo’s former top aide and confidante, Joseph Percoco, will serve six years in prison for bribery.

Fake doctor sentenced for lethal butt injection.

Noted racist James Harris Jackson fatally stabbed a 66-year-old black man with a sword in Midtown last year and told the police it was “practice” for a larger racial terror attack he planned to carry out in Times Square.

What is going on at The Edna Cohen School in Coney Island? More than a week after the primary election there are no votes reported while the State Assembly primary has a 70 vote margin between the candidates.

Governor Cuomo has proposed a memorial to those lost or made homeless by Hurricane Maria in Battery Park City. The governor also announced an expansion of the New York Stands with Puerto Rico program, which sends student volunteers to work with non-profits rebuilding homes on the island.


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The Briefly for August 16, 2018 – Removing Garbage Cans, Aretha Franklin Tribute, New Jails, and More

Middle Village is the crappiest neighborhood in Queens in a very literal sense, John Lennon’s killer is up for parole next week, felony sex crime are up 138% in city schools, and more in today’s New York City news digest.

Airbnb is donating $10 million to non-profits in an attempt to woo Albany into passing a law that would act as a runaround the city’s laws that are hostile to Airbnb’s business model.

The Department of Sanitation has a weird idea to increase cleanliness throughout the city: remove garbage cans. The MTA tried a similar idea on subway platforms and it didn’t work.

A woman jumped to hear death on Wednesday morning at the Wolcott Hotel on East 31st Street near Fifth Avenue. The woman is still unidentified.

There’s a fan-made tribute to Aretha Franklin at the Franklin St. subway station in Tribeca.

Ever since the creation of community boards in 1963, their members have been able to serve unlimited two-year terms. A new set of reforms on the November ballot could introduce term-limits for members that would allow the boards to accurately reflect changing neighborhoods.

One of the city’s new ferry lines started operation yesterday and the Soundview line cuts the commute time in half from the South Bronx to the Financial District.

Everything you need to know about registering to vote in New York City.

The de Blasio administration launched the environmental review process for four new jails in order to close Riker’s Island. Each borough would have a new jail, except Staten Island (make your own joke).

This just in: Public “squares” throughout the city aren’t square.

Governor Cuomo is ratcheting up the anti-Trump rhetoric, saying America was “never that great.” A few hours later Cuomo decided to back track and released a statement stating that America has always been great.

Former city jail-officers union boss Norman Seabrook was found guilty of bribery and faces up to 40 years in prison. This is the fifth major public-corruption conviction in the last five months.

37 years after killing John Lennon, Mark David Chapman’s tenth parole hearing is next week.

This Saturday is the annual “Clear the Shelters” event, where adoption fees are waived at the city’s animal shelters and the ASPCA will offer a name your adoption fee” event at its Manhattan shelter.

Aging sewers have turned Middle Village into the crappiest neighborhood in Queens.

Felony sex crimes rose by 138% year over year in city schools. Misdemeanor forcible-touching is up 76%.

A car on fire stopped traffic on the Brooklyn Bridge on Wednesday night.


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