The Briefly for September 1, 2020 – The “A $3.75 Reduced-Service Subway Ride” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The latest with school openings, the mayor wants a vaccine before indoor dining returns, where to eat outside in Staten Island, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 78˚
Possible light rain in the morning.

Today (Sept 1), the United Federation of Teachers’ executive board will meet to vote to authorize a strike at 3:30 pm. From a friend, I’ve heard the teachers will push for an October opening of school for in-person instruction. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Looking to make a temporary change in your address? The Times has some service journalism for you to make sure your mail gets delivered. (A.C. Shilton for NY Times)

Free bus rides are over. Front boarding started on Monday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A bus or subway fare could be raised a dollar, as hinted by MTA officials, paired with a 40% reduction in service, in an attempt to close the $9 billion gap in the MTA’s budget. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

Five cheap ways to improve the subway from a policy analyst from the Manhattan Institute. Not all of these ideas are good. (Connor Harris for Streetsblog)

There is no combination of state efforts that can address New York’s financial crisis. The full damage that the Covid-19 virus has laid upon New York state is $59 billion, meaning there is no possible way the state can tax its way out of this hole. Watch this argument carefully, because Governor Cuomo will use this to defend his decision to never increase taxes on the state’s super-rich. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state kicked the can down the road, but October 1 is the new date for the tidal wave of evictions when the moratorium ends. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The mayor created his own deadline of October 1 to either cut one billion from the city’s costs from labor or he would fire 22,000 municipal employees. On Monday, the day city employees were ready to hear about who was “at-risk” for being fired, the mayor announced that unions have asked for more time to resolve the issue. The sword of Damocles still hangs. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

September 1 gives us two months left of outdoor dining in NYC. As bars and restaurants look ahead, the question becomes “How do we survive this?” A spotlight on Jeremy’s Ale House, who doesn’t see past Halloween, unless people are allowed inside. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The biggest question looming over the city might not be “when will The Briefly return to five days a week?,” but “when is indoor dining coming back?” The mayor’s answer seems to change every day. In the last week, he’s said that the school openings would dictate it, that it wouldn’t return until the new year, and now until we see a vaccine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

How much is a life worth? Layleen Polanco’s family was awarded $5.9 million after her death after nine days in solitary confinement at Rikers Island while being held on $500 bail, a record for an inmate’s death. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The NYPD has issued a “discipline penalty matrix” that outlines specific punishments for instances of police misconduct. This isn’t in response to recent violence from the NYPD against the citizens it is supposed to protect, but form the recommendation of a 2018 independent panel. Despite the matrix, the NYPD Commissioner has the ability to ignore the matrix. The NYCLU says this is no reason to celebrate because it doesn’t show a culture of change in the NYPD and Commissioner Shea and Mayor de Blasio’s comments appear to be on the side of protecting police officers. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A 2017 NYPD “challenge coin” from East Flatbush is so racist you may have to see it to believe it that celebrates the “hunting of man” and features a caricature of a black man with dreadlocks with the shadow of a deer. (Jon Campbell for Gothamist)

Riis Park’s popularity in the last few years partially has Riis Park Beach Bazaar to thank. The lease for Riis Park Beach Bazaar is up and won’t be renewed. Instead, they have been invited to submit a proposal to compete with other vendors. (The Rockaway Times)

This is what life is like when you’re quarantined in an apartment with Miss Universe and Miss USA. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

Gyms in the city will be virtually inspected before reopening on Wednesday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Yeah, you’ve been to Governors Island, but have you been to the haunted basketball court on Governors Island? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Sutphin Blvd-Archer Ave. and Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer E train stations will be closed from September 19 through November as the MTA replaces 5,500 feet of track and more than 7,800 feet of third rail. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s pronounced “How-stun.” Here’s why. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

One of the three lawsuits blocking the Two Bridges megadevelopment was reversed, but it’s still not a green light to move forward. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The city’s land use review process comes back mid-month, which will mean Gowanus will become the epicenter of the fight over redevelopment in the city. (Amy Plitt for BKLYNER)

“The fight against Industry City has implications beyond the neighborhood. It has implications for any of us who see the city as a site of civic engagement, as a place where community thrives. It’s community, the very idea of it, that’s destroyed, as the privatization of neighborhoods grows bolder and less restrained.”
– Peter Rugh, Sunset Park is Afraid of Industry City’s Expansion, The Rest of Us Should Be Too for The Indypendent

The Mermaid Inn in the East Village is closing. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A look at waacking and its history from dance clubs in the city in the 70s and how it ended up as a Tik Tok sensation. (Ted Alcorn, video by Mohamed Sadek for NY Times)

Columbia University removed “pretty significant” slave owner Samuel Bard’s name from Bard Hall, with a promise to rename the building in the fall. (Amanda Rosa for NY Times)

Why was a statue of Christopher Columbus and the green space surrounding it in the Bronx’s Little Italy locked up? The Parks Department says it was a staff error. The statue has been protected by the NYPD since June. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Former Queens DA hopeful Tiffany Cabán is expected to run for City Council in Astoria when Costa Constantinides’s term limit is up in 2021. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Where to eat out on Staten Island. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for March 11, 2020 – The “Bill de Blasio’s Kiss of Death Endorsement” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest with COVID-19 in NYC, the five best cheese dishes in NYC, the Sunnyside Yards project is still decades away, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 55˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

10 City Island restaurants worth the trip to the city’s remote New England town. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Photos: Rockaway’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Bob Dylan was added to the summer lineup at Forest Hills Stadium. Tickets go on sale Friday for the July 8 show. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Mayor Bill de Blasio, with nothing better to dedicate his time to, has taken to Twitter to attempt to sway Elizabeth Warren to support Bernie Sanders. I called de Blasio’s February 14th endorsement of Bernie Sanders a “Kiss of Death” and less than a month later FiveThirtyEight is giving Sanders a 0.1% chance of winning the Democratic nomination. (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

Guardian Angels founder and WABC talk-radio shock jock Curtis Sliwa says he plans to run for mayor as a Republican in 2021. (NY1)

StreetsPAC endorsed Council Member Costa Constantinides for Queens borough president. Election Day is March 28. (Streetsblog)

If you’ve been waiting to see To Kill a Mockingbird, West Side Story, The Lehman Trilogy, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, and The Book of Mormon, now may be your time. Each show is offering $50 tickets through the end of the month. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The best restaurants in Elmhurst. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

A deep dive into how a 40-year-old law has blocked police transparency in New York. For the fifth year in a row, the state’s legislature is considering a repeal of the law, with near-universal support outside of police unions. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

If you aren’t tired enough of hearing about the 2020 census, the Department of Sanitation is using Oscar the Grouch to encourage us to participate. Please participate in the census, especially if it means not enduring more of this kind of advertising in ten years. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Today marks the start of the Colossus Festival, which is bringing over 200 shows and hundreds of bands to the city. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Do you know the difference between a legal dollar van and an illegal one? Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is pushing riders to educate themselves. Hint: Not having a NY license plate is a good indication it’s illegal. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The curious case of the disappearing bike lanes in Bay Ridge. (Christopher Robbins and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Sunnyside Yards project “is not something that would happen overnight.” according to the director of the project. He clarified that it is more likely a “multi-decade plan.” (Christian Murray and Michael Dorgan for Sunnyside Post)

The Strand on the Upper West Side is eyeing an April opening date. (Sara Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

The reason more pedestrians and cyclists are dying on the city’s streets is straight forward. Drivers are killing them. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Robert Sietsema’s top five cheese dishes around NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)


As of this digest’s publication, the St. Patrick’s Day Parade is still scheduled to happen, but the NYC Half-Marathon was canceled. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

SARS, Swine Flu, Ebola, Zika, and Measles. NYC’s recent history of fighting outbreaks. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

When will the mania end? Costco has ended their free samples policy due to COVID-19. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

If any New York state student or staffer tests positive for the new coronavirus, their school will close for at least 24 hours.That the edict from Governor Cuomo. (Reema Amin for ChalkBeat)

A list of schools across the city that are closed or running under altered schedules. When you read this, it may already be out of date. (QNS)

The Department of Education is telling parents not to attend parent-teacher conferences. They will instead be conducted on the phone. (Zachary Gewelb for QNS)

A note from the President and CEO of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce. (Randy Peers for Brooklyn Eagle)

Dim sum parlors East Harbor Seafood Palace, Bamboo Garden, Park Asia, and Affable in Sunset Park have all closed as a result of COVID-19 related declines in business. Dims um parlors are being hit hardest because of their large rooms and communal tables. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The state’s Attorney General Letitia James has begun sending cease and desist orders over price gouging of hand sanitizers and disinfectant sprays. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

While real estate seems to be unaffected by COVID-19 fears, it’s still too early to tell according to experts. If a pandemic can’t help you find somewhere cheap to rent, nothing can. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

If reading about the coronavirus in this digest (and everywhere else) isn’t enough for you, the city introduced a text line for updates. Text COVID to 692692 and you’ll get texts from the city about the outbreak. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Thanks to reader Alex for today’s featured photo from Edge NYC’s sneak peek in the Hudson Yards.

The Briefly for August 7, 2019 – The “A Bizzaro World Financial District” Edition

Gun violence in the city is up, the 14th St busway can move forward, James O’Neill says the decision about firing Daniel Panteleo is difficult, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Tiffany Cabán conceded to Melinda Katz in the Queens DA primary. (amNY)

National Grid is denying new service for restaurants in the city who need natural gas until the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation approves a natural gas pipeline that was rejected over water quality concerns in May. (Bedford + Bowery)

If you read the quotes about the Financial District in this Times article about the “Village-like quality” to it, Next Wednesday’s news will be saturated with child sex abuse lawsuits. Under the Child Victims Act, adult victims of child sex abuse will have one year to file lawsuits as the age to file changes from 21 to 55 moving forward. Catholic dioceses, the Boy Scouts, hospitals, and schools are all expected to be on the receiving end of hundreds of lawsuits. (Gothamist)

A woman in Queens’ complaints about her state trooper neighbor’s air conditioner resulted in her being arrested twice and strip-searched, according to a lawsuit against the neighbor, 14 members of the NYPD, and the city. (Patch)

When Bill de Blasio’s daughter moved to Gracie Mansion from an apartment in Brooklyn, she had help from her personal NYPD security detail. According to Citizens Union, having police detectives assist in this would be a violation of the city’s Conflicts of Interest Law. Another violation to add to the growing pile. (NY Times)

Portions of the old Kosciuszko Bridge are being used to form an artificial reef off Fire Island as part of the state’s artificial reef program. Also buried at sea was pieces of the Staten Island Expressway. (Untapped Cities)

Barneys filed for bankruptcy and will close 15 of its 22 stores, but its Madison Ave store will remain open. (NY Times)

It was the focus of a 30 Rock Episode (“Sun Tea” S04E06) and countless other sitcoms. Is it okay to combine two apartments? (StreetEasy)

An NYPD sergeant filed a federal lawsuit against the city and two fellow officers, claiming he was told to “go back to where you belong” and that they prevented his career from advancing due to his age and nation of origin. (Gothamist)

On August 8, Burger Kings across the city (and country) will make the Impossible Whopper available for purchase. Where else you can find the Impossible Burger in the city. (Grub Street)

An NYPD judge recommend he be fired, there have been protests for five years calling for his firing, the speaker of the city council has called for his firing, the governor says he should be fired, you can add Elizabeth Warren’s name to the list too, but NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill calls his decision about the cop who used a banned chokehold against Eric Garner that resulted in Garner’s death a “difficult decision.” (Politico)

Special education should be taken from the Department of Education and moved into the oversight of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, according to Bronx City Councilmember Andy King. The resolution follows 7,500 due process complaints against the DOE and a lawsuit against the DOE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The restraining order against the 14th St busway has been lifted and the city will move forward with its 18-month pilot program on August 12. (Gothamist)

City Councilmember Costa Constantinides is calling for the MTA’s pilot program of installing netting under aging and elevated trains in Queens to be expanded to the entire elevated stretch of the N and W lines. There have been multiple reports of falling debris and construction ephemera, including the car that was impaled on Roosevelt Ave by a wooden beam. (Curbed)

Murder, rape, robbery, burglary, felony assault, grand larceny, and auto theft are down 4% across the city this year, but gun violence is up over 5%. (Patch)

De Blasio scored an impressive 6%, but not in voters who would prefer him as a presidential candidate. 6% of people say he was the worst performer during the Democratic presidential debates. His support is still below 1%. (Politico)

Self-driving cars at the Brooklyn Navy Yard launched, but not without a minor mistake. One of the vehicles reversed into another car. The kicker? It was being driven and was not in self-driving mode at the time. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

NYPD school safety officer Edward Peterson was arrested for allegedly forcing a teenager to perform oral sex on him back in 2013. (Bklyner)

Contact with the NYPD may be bad for your health. Poor physical and mental health, hypertension and binge drinking are all more prevalent among people who have been abused by police, put behind bars or on probation or parole than those who have not, according to a report by the city’s Department of Health. (Patch)

The Metropolitan Opera and Conductor James Levine settled their lawsuit over Levine’s firing after multiple allegations were made of sexual misconduct. The settlement was out of court, so no details are known. (NY Times)

Do you have an idea of how to improve the city’s waterfront? Bring your ideas to a Waterfront Planning Camp on Governor’s Island on August 17 from noon to 4. (amNY)

A guide to surviving the summer in Williamsburg. (6sqft)