The Briefly for September 13 – 14, 2020 – The “A Bat Is In Your Home. What Do You Do?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The UWS hates the homeless, the 1st Covid-19 school shutdown, the Village Halloween parade is canceled, reactions to indoor dining, & more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 76˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Dr. Anthony Fauci said a vaccine would need to exist for nearly a year before people might feel comfortable returning to theaters unmasked, which he said would likely be mid to late 2021. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

Flying military planes over NYC on 9/11 is pretty high on the list of 2020’s stupidest ideas and 2020 is a banner year for stupid ideas. It was canceled on request of the city after Mayor de Blasio admitted he didn’t know it was happening. That guy really has his finger on the pulse. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Village Halloween Parade is canceled. It was inevitable yet still sad. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

167 CEOs and corporate bosses wrote the mayor an open letter, asking him to take action on crime and quality of life issues or else “people will be slow to return.” It was signed by the CEOs of Lyft, Warby Parker, and the WNBA among others. Not only is their message extremely deaf to the moment, but they are also asking the mayor to be a leader, which is something he has proven he’s not. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The letter is 242 words and of these business leaders “need to send a strong, consistent message that our employees, customers, clients and visitors will be coming back to a safe and healthy work environment.” These are economic descriptions of people, not how you talk about your family, friends, and neighbors. These millionaires do not offer support for a city that is facing an economic crisis, they demand action from someone else. They want everyone to come back to their offices but haven’t said how they’ll protect us. They want our support for their cause but use the language of the president when describing our streets. (J. David Goodman, Emma G. Fitzsimmons, and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Upper West Siders banded together and hired a lawyer to expel the “scum,” “trash,” and “thugs” in their neighborhood. On Facebook, they discussed an armed uprising and how they could use wasp spray and dog shit against them. They hung a noose outside of where this “scum” was living. They even convinced the mayor to move them. Who was their enemy? Homeless New Yorkers. (Gwynne Hogan and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor’s decision to remove 300 homeless New Yorkers from a shelter on the UWS has cascading effects that will force 900 New Yorkers in shelters to be moved to accommodate the change. The personal stories of the city treating people like objects that can easily be moved around are heartbreaking, but at least those people on the Upper West Side are happy. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The Legal Aid Society has plans to sue the city over the “knee-jerk capitulation” over the ejection. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

There are bats in all five boroughs. Here’s what to do if a bat gets into your home. Step one: Impossibly, stay calm. (Christopher Mele for NY Times)

A senior advisor to Chancellor Richard Carranza, Alison Hirsh, has resigned her post from the Department of Education. She left the mayor’s office in June after the NYPD’s treatment of Black Lives Matter protesters. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s the story of how a 19-year-old in federal custody ended up hiding behind a loom in someone’s apartment in Sunset Park. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

SNL is returning on October 3. There’s been no word on guests, hosts, or audiences. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Congrats to Abeda Khanam, a teacher at Robert F. Wagner High School in Long Island City, for being named state Senator John Liu’s Woman of Distinction for 2020. (QNS)

Local Law 1932-A suspends enforcement of the personal-liability provision in commercial leases of COVID-impacted tenants and it’s set to expire on September 30, but City Council has plans of extending it through March of 2021. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Photos: The Trump Statues Initiative, which is bringing “living performance pieces” to the city’s streets, like “The Final Push” which features a “gold” President Trump in a golf cart being pushed by Laura Ingram and Sean Hannity over headstones. (Untapped New York)

NYC is now home to the world’s first-ever Makeup Museum. It’s now open with its debut exhibition “Pink Jungle: 1950’s Makeup in America.” (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea posted a photo to Twitter of the top brass of the NYPD and officers openly violating the state’s mask and event mandates at an indoor gathering with over 50 people inside police headquarters. The mayor called it “a mistake that needs to be rectified going forward.” (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A stroll through Pomander Walk, the city’s most exclusive street. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I Love NY is looking for volunteers to give foliage reports each week. Leaf peeper wanted! (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Department of Education confirmed there were 19 positive Covid-19 tests in city schools among teachers with two in one school, triggering an automatic 24 closure. Students don’t return until September 21. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

A look at Chloë Bass’s outdoor art exhibition “Wayfinding” in St. Nicholas Park. (Brian Boucher for NY Times)

A look at an unlikely for crime detterance: More pools. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

“Even with these ongoing concerns, expanded outdoor dining is … nice. Freed of these unnerving matters, expanded outdoor dining would be almost unthinkably pleasant. The fact is, for an ad hoc system that was initiated to help New York’s restaurants survive, expanded outdoor dining works remarkably well.”
-Alan Systma, Let’s Just Make Expanded Outdoor Dining Permanent for Grub Street

Indoor dining returns at a 25% capacity on September 30, but that alone will not save the restaurant industry. A look at what 25% looks like and interviews with several restauranteurs about what business looks like for them going forward. (Ben Yakas with additional reporting by Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

“The 25% is not going to buy us very much at all.” Paul Giannone, owners of Paulie Gee’s and Paulie G’s Slice Shop. Restaurants react to the return of indoor dining. (Hannah Albertine & Chris Mohney for The Infatuation)

Learn about Elizabeth Jennings: The NYC teacher who desegregated NYC transit. (Jerry Mikorenda for Atlas Obscura)

Apartment Porn: What’s a solarium? This $1.6 million East Village condo has a solarium. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Where to eat outside in Fort Greene. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The state’s Department of Labor has announced that an extra $300 in weekly federal pandemic unemployment benefits will start hitting bank accounts as soon as next week. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Trump administration has secretly siphoned nearly $4 million away from a program that tracks and treats FDNY firefighters and medics suffering from 9/11 related illnesses. (Michael McAuliff for Daily News)

When the headline is enough: Thoughts on the politics and possibilities behind the MTA’s Doomsday budget proposal. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave. Sagas)

Photos: A Red Phalarope found its way to Stuyvesant Cove Park on Saturday morning. It’s a rare sight in the city for birders and for the rest of us, it’s a cool little bird. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

The ten best fried chicken sandwiches in NYC. Yes, the Popeye’s sandwich made the list. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo!

Note from Rob: Thursday’s article about NYPD Assistant Chief Christopher McCormack was written by Joaquin Sapien, Topher Sanders, and Nate Schweber and co-published with ProPublica and included reporting and analysis from The City.

The Briefly for August 30, 2020 – The “There’s A Great Hot Dog Stand Nearby” Sunday Edition

Today’s NYC news digest: A four-way city schools standoff, what to expect as museums open across the city, where to eat after 11pm, trash in parks, and more

Today – Low: 65˚ High: 80˚
Clear throughout the day.

Wondering what the hell was going on with those fireworks over the Hudson on Thursday night right around 11 pm ? Those were a part of MTV’s Video Music Awards. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

With the first of the month right around the corner, here’s what you should know about rent concessions. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Headlines about New York having the lowest infection rates in six months area great, but they are no reason to relax about following the guidelines. These headlines are literally the reason to stay strict. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The mayor’s plan to reopen the schools is a gamble, and he’s gambling with the health of students, teachers, and staff. With the numbers being as low as they are at the moment, it may look safe, but it’s still a gamble that doesn’t yet have the complete support of the teachers’ union. As we get closer and closer to September 10, we face a showdown between the United Federation of Teachers, who may still call for a strike over safety concerns, the mayor’s office, the City Council, which plans to call for a delay, and Governor Cuomo, who could still step in and overrule the mayor’s decision. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

When colleges in the state have 100 cases in two weeks or the total cases equal 5% of the on-campus population, the entire school will go into remote learning for two weeks. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Museum of Natural History plans on opening next month, but those plans could be derailed by a dispute with its union over privacy concerns. The museum wants its employees to use an app to track Covid-19 symptoms using an app whose data is not protected by HIPPA. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

MoMA PS1 will reopen on September 17. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

A guide to MoMA and the Met. (NY Times)

Photos: A first look at the Met’s new Roof Garden Commission Lattice Detour by Héctor Zamora. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

What to expect when heading back to a museum for the first time since March. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Yeah, the Met is opening, but more importantly, the Hot Dog King is back. These kinds of stories seem inconsequential, people who truly love New York have little bits of knowledge that have been obliterated by the pandemic. These kinds of stories are the ones that defy the narrative that the city is, ahem, “dead.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

“Have you not walked the streets? Have you not seen the people here? Born here, bred here, living and breathing here. They are scrappy, scared, hungry, and tired, but more importantly, they’re pissed. If anything the rebel cry of thousands, millions, fighting to live is what should terrify anyone that dare declare us dead.”
– Ariama C. Long, Who The Fuck Are You To Tell Me My City’s Dead for Kings County Politics

The argument that laughs in the face of the modern “Why I left New York” essay. (Talmon Joseph Smith for The Atlantic)

The House of Yes’ liquor license was suspended. The center of the suspension seems to be centered around the House of Yes not offering food directly, but relying on a “sister” restaurant and seemingly pleading ignorance of how the rules worked in addition to playing loud music. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Check out the designs for the Brooklyn park dedicated to LGBTQ advocate Marsha P. Johnson. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

At the RNC, President Trump made some assertions about crime in New York City. Here are the facts. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Speaking of the RNC, multiple New Yorkers who are NYCHA residents were featured in a video during the convention without their knowledge. They have come forward to let everyone know they are not Trump supporters and were tricked into appearing the in the video. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

MSG will be used as a polling site in November’s election thanks to the deal the NBA players’ union made with the league’s owners. There hasn’t been any word about the Barclays Center yet. (Faraz Toor for NY1)

In a move to attempt to stave off clerical problems in a similar fashion to the ones that were ever-present in the June primaries, Governor Cuomo signed and tweaked legislation that will notify voters of issues with their ballots that can be fixed within seven days of being notified. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYPD officer Henry Vidal was arrested in March for beating his partner inside her Harlem apartment. He was suspended without pay and ordered to stay away from the woman. On Friday he violated that order and reportedly pulled a gun on her and threatened to kill her inside her sister’s home. He was arrested and is still suspended without pay. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s new chokehold ban is a month old and already the City Council is bowing to the NYPD and is considering amending it. The NYPD is banned from sitting, kneeling, or standing on someone’s chest or back that compresses the diaphragm. The NYPD wants to add the word “recklessly” to the wording, which is a loophole big enough to drive an NYPD SUV straight through. (NY1)

This is the NYPD, which has no problem recklessly parking and blocking bus stops. (Jose Martinez for The City)

This is the same NYPD that has been occupying streets adjacent to precincts since June and has recently gone as far as setting up “checkpoints” on their needlessly occupied streets. (Nick Garber for Patch)

It’s hard to imagine our idiot mayor enforcing anything when his motorcade blocked a waterfront bike lane so he could make an announcement about ferries. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Trash complaints are up 120% in the city’s parks. The city’s solution is an advertising campaign urging people to throw out their trash. While I can appreciate the effort, actually maintaining the parks may go further than asking people politely, but with an $84 million budget cut, ads in LinkNYC kiosks might be as good as we can get. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

If you want to see President Trump wearing a mask (a facemask, not a leather gimp mask you sickos), the only place you’ll be able to see it is in Madame Tussauds in Times Square. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Punjabi Deli on Houston is open for the first time in four months. The food is legendary, especially for vegans and vegetarians. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The city added six more streets for outdoor dining in Boerum Hill, Garment District, Flatiron, Harlem, and Astoria. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

‘Tis the season for billionaires to form shady coalitions and astroturfed “advocacy” to fight the idea that the rich should be taxed, if not eaten whole. It almost worked, but their partners are all withdrawing after being outed as possibly bankrolled by a billionaire Republican. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Thinking about starting a food business? How about shelling out for this space shuttle food truck? It was formerly a DC-3 airliner and has a full-service, commercial kitchen, restroom, and cockpit. You’ll have to sell a lot of astronaut ice cream to afford the $149,000 price point. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Congrats to Mayor de Blasio, who is overseeing a city that is giving thousands of parking tickets to its frontline nurses, despite explicitly giving them parking placards to avoid getting tickets. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1)

At the beginning of the year, it seemed like we had three front-runners for 2021’s mayoral race with Comptroller Scott Stringer, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. Three men and two of them are white. The Times asks do New York City voters want another white mayor? (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Where to eat outside after 11pm. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Michael for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 28, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining, I Don’t Know Her” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A look at the state of bars and restaurants vs the SLA, where we stand with the start of NYC’s school year, great spots buffalo wings, & more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 86˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 65˚ High: 80˚

Try not to roll your eyes, but here’s the big “New York is dead. Here’s why” link. Try to prevent your eyes from rolling all the way out of your head when reading this dipshit’s thinly veiled “Why I’m Leaving New York” essay. (James Altucher)

“Listening to him go, “I used to play chess all day. I could meet people. I could start any type of business.” Wipe your tears, wipe your butt and pull it together. He says he knows people who have left New York for Maine, Vermont, Tennessee, Indiana. I have been to all of these places many, many, many times over many decades. And with all due respect and affection, Are .. You .. Kidding .. Me?!”
-Jerry Seinfeld, So You Think New York Is ‘Dead’ for NY Times

The city’s school will have the option to hold classes outdoors in yards, nearby streets, or parks. PTAs will be responsible for fundraising for supplies and equipment for schools to hold classes outdoors. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

“Chinatown is very traditional, almost to a fault, where we’ve let our elders take over. And we need to learn from our elders, but young people need to be making decisions now, and move Chinatown further. And seeing people like Patrick Mock start standing up and speaking out on the injustices we’ve suffered, it gives us a hope for the future.” -Conversations with politicians, business owners, and locals about the future of Chinatown. (James Ramsay for Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James asked a judge to order Eric Trump to testify in the state’s inquiry into possible fraud committed by the Trump Organization and President Trump. (William K. Rashbaum and Danny Hakim for NY Times)

NYPD officer Kyle Erickson has been twice accused of planting marijuana during traffic stops on Staten Island and despite bodycam footage to prove he did it, he was cleared of any wrongdoing. Just a sample of the 4,000 pages of documents released by the Staten Island District Attorney’s office about NYPD officers’ dishonesty and (lack) of discipline. (George Joseph and Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Restaurants have been closing, but not failing. An argument for why the distinction matters. (Talia Saxe for Eater)

A series of bars and restaurants sued the SLA this week to roll back their recent rule change that barred live music ticketed events, and other forms of outdoor entertainment. Disclosure: The lawsuit includes Littlefield, where I was hosting trivia all summer on Wednesdays. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

More than 20 state senators are calling on the State Liquor Authority to ease up on their restaurant and bar crackdown. Since mid-June, the SLA conducted over 41,000 checks, 165 businesses lost their liquor licenses temporarily, and 886 were charged with violations. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The City Council voted to extend the 20% commission cap on delivery fees for restaurants until 90 days after they are allowed to operate at full capacity with indoor dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

And when will indoor dining return? The mayor says that depends on how our return to schools goes on September 10. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Although he also hinted that 2021 was a possibility for a return to indoor dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

What’s the return to schools look like? A friend of mine who’s a teacher in the city told me they are getting ready to strike, but in the meantime the city has to inspect 1,700 public schools housed in 1,300 buildings by September 1 with plans to release a report on September 4. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Of the city’s 1,700 schools, 1,030 of them had some kind of documented problem with air supply or exhaust components. Chalkbeat compiled the most recent inspection reports publicly available for each school. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

An additional 30,000 students opted out of any in-person classes this year, bringing the total to 337,394 students that will not step inside a school this school year. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Reopening day at the New York Aquarium. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

This Saturday is the reimagined Coney Island Mermaid Parade. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

This Sunday is the MTV Video Music Awards that Governor Cuomo announced back in June. MTV built a stage in Greenpoint instead of using the Barclay Center, citing that an outdoor event without an audience would be safer than an indoor one. Performers will be getting an exemption from the state’s 14-day mandatory quarantine. (Greenpointers)

According to the mayor, 20% of the city’s new Cobid-19 patients are linked to travelers. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

US and UK authorities are discussing an “air bridge” exemption from quarantine for travel between New York and London. (Payton Potter for Patch)

With a filing for bankruptcy back in May, the future of the John Varvatos shop in the old home of CBGB might be in jeopardy. Which camp are you in when it comes to John Varvatos replacing CBGB? “At least it’s not a Duane Reade” or “Who cares, let it die?” (EV Grieve)

Revel’s electric mopeds relaunched with new safety protocols. Not sure how I feel about sending the company a selfie of me wearing one of their helmets. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Unmown lawns, unemptied garbage cans, and littered playgrounds. Welcome to the city’s parks when the city needs them the most. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

An engagement while canoeing on the Gowanus Canal: Doomed or beautiful? (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Do you know who makes the decision to return the subway back to 24/7 service? No, seriously, no one seems to know. The governor says to ask the MTA Chairman. The MTA Chairman says to ask the health commissioner. Can I declare the subways open 24/7 again? I hereby declare the subways open 24/7! Did it work? (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Photos: King Nyani, the city’s largest bronze gorilla statue, which can hold 2 or 3 people at once. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

Everything you need to know about living in a first-floor apartment. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

Front-door boarding of city buses returns on Monday and so do fares on buses. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

The Mets and Marlins walked off the field after a moment of silence for 42 seconds with a Black Lives Matter t-shirt draped over home plate. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The assholes of the week are “The Illmore,” which has reportedly hosting secret indoor parties since June. The Illmore is, of course, in Bushwick. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Second place goes to Beavis and Butthead over here: Crime in NYC is near an all-time low, historically speaking, which is why former mayor Rudy Giuliani and current Police Benevolent Association president Pat Lynch were at the RNC calling crime in NYC a “public safety disaster.” Murders in NYC in 2019 were down about 50% from Rudy Giuliani’s last year in office. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Six great buffalo wings in the city. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Helena for today’s featured photo.