The Briefly for July 10, 2019 – The “20,000 People Buried Under Washington Square Park” Edition

Today’s US Women’s National Team parade, a series of stabbings, here comes an express F train, the latest in the BQE rehab, Arcade Bakery is closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Saw Mill Playground in Mott Haven reopened with the added bonus of being outfitted with infrastructure that can handle stormwater runoff, up to 1.3 million gallons a year. (Bronx Times)

The cross-town rivalry has been rekindled, but replace town with the country. With DeNiro opening a new studio complex and Netflix expanding big in New York, we’re ready to challenge Hollywood. (NY Times)

Transit Alternatives held a “mass die-in” in Washington Square Park on Tuesday, protesting the street safety crisis that has lead to 15 cyclists killed by drivers in 2019. (amNY)

If you’re someone who gets creeped out at the idea of bodies being buried in common locations in the city, this story isn’t for you. Bone fragments that were found during construction in Washington Square Park were removed during construction will be reinterred at the park. Washington Square Park was once a potter’s field, a common mass grave, and there’s an estimated 20,000 who were buried there. (Downtown Express)

Everyone loves a sale, except when it comes to real estate. It’s counter-intuitive, but the numbers show that price cuts on homes in NYC don’t work in the same fashion as they do at Old Navy. (Street Easy)

If you’re looking for your first home to purchase, congrats, NYC is among the country’s worst places to buy your first home thanks to metrics like friendliness to first-time buyers, affordability, real estate taxes, and crime. (Patch)

8 no car needed day trips away from the city. (NY Times)

Take a look at the first section of Shirley Chisholm State Park that recently opened. (Untapped Cities)

You can live like a convicted felon! Two of Paul Manafort’s homes are for sale as he sits in jail for seven-and-a-half years. (Street Easy)

So, uh, maybe in 2019 it’s time for Big Gay Ice Cream to change the name of their “Salty Pimp” ice cream? (Eater)

The mayor is calling for more transparency and oversight surrounding taxi medallions after a 45-day review of what’s lead to the financial crisis in the taxi industry. Medallion owners and a portion of the city council were calling for a bailout, but the mayor’s plan falls short of including one. (Gothamist)

The Wing is expanding its women-only coworking empire with an additional outpost in Williamsburg and another in Bryant Park. (Curbed)

The mayor’s plan to close Rikers, explained. (Curbed)

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams isn’t having it, asking the city to reduce the size of the detention complex planned for Atlantic Avenue to 900 beds from 1,150. Adams also requesting for more health services in jails to reduce recidivism. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you never want your Stranger Things experience to end, Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein are performing music from the show in October at Brooklyn Steel. Tickets go on sale this Friday. (BrooklynVegan)

Has summer finally made the city feral? A New Jersey man crashed his car into a blockade near a federal building downtown claiming he had a bomb in his car. The bomb squad determined he did not. (Gothamist)

A woman was stabbed to death at the Sutter Avenue-Rutland Road 3 train station on Monday night. Someone was taken into custody, but no charges were files at publication. (amNY)

A woman was stabbed in the Gowanus Whole Foods parking lot on Monday night. A suspect, Rodney Robinson, was arrested and charged. The victim was treated at a nearby hospital. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s go-to spots for French pastries, Arcade Bakery, will be closing. Roger Gural cites rheumatoid arthritis as the reason he’s closing. (Eater)

Roger Gural’s and Karen Bornarth’s recipe for croissants. With 33 steps, it’s probably easier to experience them yourself at the bakery. (Serious Eats)

The NYPD wasted no time towing cars away from the newly demapped area of Willets Point, freeing up the area for redevelopment. (QNS)

It’s an alternative community art space that’s in the location of a former taxi cab garage. No, this one’s no in Bushwick, it’s in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

There are 114 uncounted votes in the Katz/Cabán primary that were rejected for errors by poll workers. The current vote separation is 16 and are hundreds of ballots that were rejected and with such a slim lead, each one will become a legal fight of its own. (The Indypendent)

Watch a time-lapse of the installation of Phenomenal Nature—Mrinalini Mukherjee at the Met Breuer. (Viewing NYC)

The BQE rehab panel won’t accept any new concepts and have hinted that they will be suggesting a less severe plan than the ones that would require the removal of the Brooklyn Promenade. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here comes DragCon. (amNY)

How to watch today’s U.S. Women’s National Team’s parade, which starts at 9:30 this morning. (Curbed)

Some Nike subway ads featuring Megan Rapinoe were vandalized in what the NYPD says is a potential hate crime. (amNY)

When the parade is all over, 350 sanitation workers and 19 trucks will begin their job of cleaning up the revelry. (amNY)

Pre-foreclosures are up 43% in the city, with the largest number of them coming from East New York. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The MTA is adding some F express trains in Brooklyn to the morning and evening commutes in an attempt to shave some commuting times down. (amNY)

9 great theater district restaurants for before or after a show. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for April 3, 2019 – The “Ghosting Capital of the World” Edition

The plastic bag ban may birth a paper bag fee, New Yorkers disapprove of congestion pricing, Irving Plaza will temporarily close, and more in today’s daily NYC newsletter.

Bay Ridge’s greatest Italian hero is vegan? Sacrilege! (Eater)

With the eventual plastic bag ban taking place next year, the city is also considering a $0.05 fee for paper bags to benefit the NYC Environmental Protection Fund and go towards giving low-income New Yorkers and the elderly reusable bags for free. (Gothamist)

New York City is the capital of ghosting. 41% of New Yorkers say they’ve been ghosted, higher than any of the other 48 cities surveyed. (Time Out)

The Zagat guide book is coming back for New York City and your vote matters, much like participatory budgeting. You voted for participatory budgeting, right? (NY Times)

Here’s how the new mansion tax will affect luxury real estate. (Curbed)

The 10 best spots for plant classes. (6sqft)

We’re #1! #1 in the highest chunk of our paychecks that go towards taxes. (Patch)

Chanel Lewis is guilty of the 2016 killing of Karina Vetrano. It was Lewis’s second trial. (Gothamist)

Yesterday was one of six Gender Pay Gap days, and in New York, the gap has only gotten worse. (Gothamist)

The Tony Luke’s Philly cheesesteak has arrived in New York. Is it any good? (Grub Street)

So maybe escape rooms are dangerous if you, you know, can’t actually escape? (Gothamist)

Tracy Morgan got a key to Brooklyn, so what did he do with it? (amNY)

Governor Cuomo got an 11.7% raise this year and will get a 12.5% raise next year and an additional 11% in 2021. Not a bad job to have. (NY Post)

There’s a new chairman and CEO of the MTA, but it’s a little weird the state approved Pat Foye for the job on Monday morning at 2am. (Gothamist)

Governors Island’s 2019 season starts in a month and will have expanded hours and an additional ferry from Manhattan. (Curbed)

The Regional Planning Association has a suggestion to reduce traffic on the section of the BQE that needs repairs: reduce the number of lanes. (Curbed)

Missing from the state’s budget? No, not legal weed. No, not a pied-à-terre tax. No, not a ban on bump stocks. No, not increased oversight. Electric scooters. (Gothamist)

A Quinnipiac University poll shows that 54% of New Yorkers are against congestion pricing. The opposition is highest in the Bronx, where 62% disagree with the passing of the new rules. (NY State of Politics)

Also in the poll is that 57% of those surveyed favor changing admissions to the city’s specialized high schools. (NY Post)

Three alleged MS-13 members have been indicted on murder charges for the shooting death of a man on the 7 train platform on February 3. (Jackson Heights Post)

If you’ve ever stepped into the wrong car assuming it was your Lyft or Uber, you’re not alone. After the death of Samantha L. Josephson, who stepped into the wrong car in South Carolina, City council Speaker Corey Johnson says a bill requiring all for-hire drivers to have illuminated signs in their windows makes sense for NYC. (NY Post)

What’s behind the spike in murders in Brooklyn? (NY Times)

We’re just about to get Webster Hall back and now Irving Plaza announced it will close for eight months later this year for renovations. (BrooklynVegan)

The NYPD’s Inspector General’s Office recommended 42 reforms in a report. Of the 42, six have been implemented, 16 have been outright rejected and the rest sit in limbo. Must be nice to make your own rules. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio has suspended the proposed cuts to the FDNY, agreeing to meet with the department and unions to figure out a new deal. (NY Post)

Reports of rapes in the city have seen a slight decrease since last year, the second decrease in the last 18 months. Before December of 2018, the last time reported rapes had decreased was August 2017. (Patch)

The state budget called for a reduction of Special Olympics funding by $50,000, but after the federal government pulled all of its funding the state has reversed its decision. (NY State of Politics)

Where to eat and drink with your human (when you’re a dog). (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for February 21, 2019 – The “No One Thinks de Blasio Should Run for President” Edition

A look at the Public Advocate debate, low-level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn, the city lied to get more FEMA funding, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It looks like a museum, but it’s a button store named for a Gertrude Stein poem. (Atlas Obscura)

The city subpoenaed 20,000 apartment listings from Airbnb as a response to what Mayor de Blasio says is Airbnb’s unwillingness to cooperate with the city to crackdown on illegal hotels. (The Real Deal)

The 11 best things to do on Roosevelt Island, but maybe you want to wait for spring first. (6sqft)

There is a special election for the city’s Public Advocate on Tuesday. As a reader of The Briefly you are among some of the most informed voters in the city. Here’s what you need to know about the election. (Gothamist)

Watch the second Public Advocate debate in full. (NY1)

There is one thing that all the Public Advocate candidates from last night’s debate agree on: Bill de Blasio should not run for president. (Politico)

StreetsPAC has endorsed Melissa Mark-Viverito for Public Advocate. (Streetsblog)

The 12 best restaurants in Rego Park and Forest Hills. (Grub Street)

Five takeaways from the Public Advocate debate. (Patch)

New York City will never become a cashless society if Councilman Ritchie Torres’s bill passes. (NY Times)

Low level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn. At a cost of $2,000 per arrest, it’s quite a bit of savings. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Can you run a business out of your apartment? (Bushwick Daily)

If you want to party like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide. If you want to avoid partying like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide of places to avoid. (amNY)

13 bars and restaurants for history lovers across the United States, including Manhattan’s Fraunces Tavern. (Atlas Obscura)

The gentrification of Bed Stuy is threatening the existence of the city’s last black-owned LGBTQ club. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Have you ever been through a breakup so bad that it makes you swear off dating altogether? The End Corporate Welfare Act is the City Council’s version of that with luring giant corporations to the city with subsidies. (Patch)

Take a look at Spike Lee’s New York City. (StreetEasy)

How can the MTA fix the R train? Congressman Max Rose’s solution is Solomon-esque. (amNY)

Murder in the city is up by 55% this year compared to last. Some police officers are blaming the end of stop and frisk. (NY Post)

The city lied to FEMA to get more Hurricane Sandy relief funding and will pay the federal government back more than $5.3 million as part of a tentative settlement. (NY Times)

East Harlem residents are feeling pissed about this closed public bathroom. So are the recipients of the more than 1,500 public urination summonses in the area. (Patch)

Winter is harsh on the city, but it causes chaos, explosions, fires, leaks, and uncertainty underground, where electric, steam, water, and gas lines flow. Climate change is making it worse. (NY Times)

Bookmark this list for the next extremely cold day. 19 stellar soups. (Eater)

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