The Briefly for February 2-4, 2021 – The “Who Needs Health Experts?” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Mayoral candidates debate, the 16 year wait for a park, Sunnyside’s “Limpdick Landlord,” Yankee Stadium becomes a vaccination site, and more

Today – Low: 27˚ High: 33˚
Snow (1–2 in.) until evening.

PlowNYC is an interactive map to find out when the last time your street was plowed. (cityofnewyork.us)

The special election for Queens Council District 24 is still happening today, despite the storm. Early voting has been open since January 23. Four of the eight candidates have requested a delay, but the mayor’s office said the election will push forward. (Christine Chung for The City)

Find your City Council district using your address with this map.

How does ranked choice voting work in NYC? (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Yankee Stadium will become a mass vaccination site for Bronx residents only. Ten zip codes near the stadium are at a 10.32% positivity rate. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Interview: Gothamist asked Dr. Adam Berman, a toxicologist and chairman of emergency medicine at Northwell Health’s Long Island Jewish Hospital, should you avoid pain relievers before or after taking the Covid-19 vaccine? The simple answer is that if you can avoid doing them, avoid them, but there’s not enough evidence against it. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

“As the vaccine effort ramps up, Cuomo and the MTA have a very easy way to gracefully usher in the return of passengers to the subways on a 24/7 by tying it to access to vaccination hubs.”
-Benjamin Kabak, How the vaccine creates a politically expedient way to end the overnight subway closures, for Second Ave. Sagas

Governor Cuomo said in a press conference that he doesn’t really trust health experts. Maybe that’s why nine of his top health officials quit their jobs in the last year. This guy literally released a book about leadership lessons. (J. David Goodman, Joseph Goldstein, and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Restaurant workers, deemed to be “essential” by Governor Cuomo, are not essential enough to be eligible for the coronavirus vaccine as indoor dining resumes on February 14. Governor Cuomo was forced to defend his decision, saying it was based on “data and expert advice.” Which experts? (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio announced the Mayor’s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety (MAP) in 2014 to reduce crime in 15 high-crime housing developments. In those 15 developments, the number of major crimes in those developments was up in 2020. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Death by Speculation, Starring Limpdick Landlord.” The sign of the year goes to the shuttered Center Cinemas in Sunnyside. (Christian Murray for Sunnyside Post)

New York spent $18.2 billion in 2019 on police, jails, prisons, prosecutors, parole, and probation while only spending about $6.2 billion on mental health services, public health, youth programs and services, recreation, and elder services according to a new report from the Center for Community Alternatives. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

The mayoral candidates had their first debate. Focus seemed to be on the Yang campaign’s use of NDAs for campaign staffers, Eric Adams’ comments that some New Yorkers should “go back to Iowa,” and Raymond McGuire’s work with CitiBank after the financial collapse. (Dana Rubinstein for NY Times)

One topic that’s bubbling up again amongst the candidates is city control over the subways, which is sound like a conceptually good idea until the city has to take on the subway’s debt. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Interview: Zach Iscol discusses his mayoral campaign. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

Another week, another story about NYC Sheriffs breaking up a party in an illegal club, this time in Jackson Heights. This pandemic is never going to end with jackasses like this. (Allie Griffin for Jackson Heights Post)

The city promised to build a new 3-acre park in Greenpoint in 2005 in exchange for allowing new luxury condos to be built in the neighborhood. Sixteen years later Greenpoint is still waiting for its park. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The Barclays Center is looking to diversify its vendors, looking for Brooklyn-based suppliers that are a minimum 51% owned, operated, and managed by minorities, women, disabled, and/or military veterans. (Jake Samieske for Brooklyn Magazine)

Super Bowl spreads from NYC restaurants. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Fifteen favorite tofu dishes in city restaurants. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Jenn for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 22, 2020 – The “Rich New Yorkers Are Not Leaving” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: NYC temporarily closes vaccination sites, the Port Authority could get a renovation, the Hunts Point Produce Market strike, and more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 41˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 22˚ High: 34˚

Mayor de Blasio closed all 15 of the city’s vaccination hubs due to a delay in vaccination shipments of the Moderna vaccine from Washington. The city’s 15 vaccination hubs will reopen when “supplies pick up.” Appointments for people receiving their second shot will be rescheduled, but it’s best to contact the city’s vaccine hotline at 877-VAX-4NYC if you don’t hear anything soon. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

23,000 vaccination appoints have already been rescheduled. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

It’s not just the city, the state is running low on vaccines too. At the current rate of 250k shipped vaccine doses weekly, it will take seven months to vaccinate New Yorkers that are currently eligible. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A Covid-19 home test vending machine will be coming to W 34th St on Tuesday the 26th inside the new Wellness 4 Humanity store. Tests will cost $119. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Governor Cuomo is asking the federal government for $15 billion in aid or he’ll be cored to raise taxes on the state’s rich, which he thinks will scare them off. Hey dummy, do both. The rich aren’t going anywhere. (Greg David for The City)

Rents for the biggest and most expensive apartments in Manhattan rose by double-digit percentages in December. It’s time to end the charade that the rich are somehow abandoning New York City. (Jeff Andrews for Curbed)

How desperate is the state for money? Lobbying has begun to try to build casinos in Manhattan. (Dana Rubinstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The Port Authority in Manhattan may get a $10 billion overhaul. It would take at least a decade to complete and it would be partially financed by selling the air rights to a commercial tower on top of the terminal and nearby buildings. (Patrick McGeehan and Winnie Hu for NY Times)

The Astoria Mutual Aid Network is raising money so their neighbors in public housing don’t have to live without heat in the winter. For those looking to help, you can still donate. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Interview: Joe Lentol reflects on his over forty years of public service as Assemblymember from the state’s 50th district in Greenpoint after being ousted by Emily Gallagher. (Julia Kott for Greenpointers)

Rendering: No one will accuse 555 Broadway in Brooklyn of looking boring, but it does look like someone is about to lose a game of Jenga. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

Mets General Manager Jared Porter was fired for sending lewd and explicit text messages to a female reporter in 2016. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Rough Trade NYC is closing their Williamsburg store in order to relocate. They’ve also cut ties with Bowery Presents, who will not be a part of the new location. They have not announced a new location yet, but hope to be open by summer. Their website will remain open in the meantime. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Jimmy Van Bramer, the thwarter of Amazon’s HQ2 plans, announced he will run for Queens borough president. (Christina Santucci for Queens Post)

Former southern Brooklyn and Staten Island Congressman Max Rose will serve as a senior advisor on Covid-19 in the Pentagon. While serving in Afghanistan, Rose earned a Purple Heart. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Watch Republican Staten Island Congressmember Nicole Malliotakis get pushed around on CNN and called out on her shit after opposing the 2020 election results and calling for unity immediately afterward. (Erin Burnett Out Front on CNN)

The Manhattan District Attorney Democratic Primary is in June and current DA Cy Vance has raised $4,000 to date. Call me crazy, but it doesn’t seem like he’s running again, even if he hasn’t made any announcements. (Josefa Velasquez and Rachel Holliday Smith)

James Dolan, New York City’s worst songwriter, CEO of Madison Square Garden Entertainment Corp, and owner of the Knicks and Rangers, started a new political expenditure committee “The Coalition to Restore New York.” Dolan will likely support anyone for mayor that won’t end MSG’s 38-year real estate tax break. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

7 forgotten subway entrances. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Long Island City’s Trump Countdown Clock has finally hit zero. (LICtalk)

NYC’s most anticipated restaurant openings of spring 2021. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The Bushwick Bar Babes of 2021 calendar is now available. All the charm of Bushwick’s best bars with none of the smell. I miss making jokes about Bushwick. (Matt Fink for Bushwick Daily)

AOC was not at the Inauguration Day in DC because she was backing the workers’ strike at the Hunts Point Produce Market in the Bronx, where 60% of the city’s produce is handled. Workers are striking for a $1/hour raise. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A rundown of what’s going on at the Hunts Point Produce Market. (Rachel Sugar for Eater)

Success Academy, New York City’s largest charter network, will remain fully virtual for the rest of the school year. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The alleged serial killer in a Brownsville NYCHA complex was arrested on Thursday. His alleged victims were three elderly women all 78 or older. (NY1)

The New York state lawsuit that seeks to dissolve the NRA will be allowed forward. The NRA had attempted to move the lawsuit to federal court. You might say that Attorney General Letitia James has the NRA in her sights. *groan* (Brooklyn Eagle)

Mayor Bill de Blasio has a new idea for disciplining the NYPD – a promise to fire NYPD cops who use illegal chokeholds. What an innovative idea that the mayor could have had at any moment between the 2014 killing of Eric Garner and today. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

A new class-action lawsuit accuses the NYPD of violating the rights of New Yorkers through “demoralizing and brutal shows of force, rather than genuine efforts to facilitate protesters’ protected First Amendment activity” and is seeking monetary damages for those who were brutalized and arrested during demonstrations. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The NYPD will serve disciplinary charges against Officer Wayne Isaacs, who used his service weapon to shoot and kill Delrawn Small, an unarmed Black man, following an apparent driving dispute in Brooklyn in 2016. (Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

The State Legislature is finally poised to repeal the state’s discriminatory ban on “Walking While Trans” in the coming weeks. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Podcast: Congrats to Untapped New York for the launch of their new Secrets of New York podcast. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Manhattan pickup artist Samuel Fisher encouraged people to bring guns to DC leading up to the insurrection at the Capitol, saying “they can’t arrest us all man.” He was arrested on Wednesday. You might say the pickup artist was “picked up” by the FBI. *groan* (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

U.S. Army soldier Cole James Bridges was arrested Tuesday for trying to assist ISIS by plotting to kill fellow soldiers in the Middle East and providing advice on potential terrorist targets in New York, including the 9/11 Memorial, according to the Department of Justice. (Matt Katz for Gothamist)

Brendan Hunt, who also went by the handle “X-Ray Ultra,” was arrested by the FBI in Queens for allegedly threatening to murder or incite others to murder members of Congress, specifically AOC and Chuck Schumer. He was suspended without pay by the New York State Office of Court Administration where he works full-time. (Jonathan Dienst, Marc Santia and Joe Valiquette for NBC New York)

Five picks from Time Out on what to stream if you’re missing New York City. I would have put the 1990 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles on the list, but that’s just my pick. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

A first look at the Brooklyn Dumpling Shop’s Automat. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Quickly, take a look at the Bernie meme in various NYC locations before it stops being amusing. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Briefly for October 16 – 17, 2020 – The “Greatest Mystery of 2020” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: NYPD’s Chief of Patrol resigns, the new rules for outdoor dining, how to negotiate rent, all the mayoral candidates dunk on de Blasio & more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 64˚
Rain throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 48˚ High: 62˚

Video: Watch the congressional debate between Congressmember Max Rose and NY Assemblyperson Nicole Malliotakis. Vote for Max Rose. (NY1)

“Time and time again, Trump-loving State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis has used votes and influence as an elected official to fight against efforts to improve LGBTQ rights — and there’s a chance she could bring her bigoted politics to the national stage.”
-Matt Tracy, Nicole Malliotakis’ Dismal Record on LGBTQ Issues for Gay City News

Farewell to Dangerfield’s on the Upper East Side, which was forced to close after 50 years. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

This is, and I can’t understate this enough, the greatest mystery of the year. (EV Grieve)

City civilian inspectors gave out 1,095 Covid-19 safety measure violations to 247 spots between Sept. 29 and Oct. 13, according to Mayor de Blasio’s office. The biggest offense? Lack of cleaning log. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Another fight in the endless battle between Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio: if yeshivas can decide they’re “childcare centers to skirt the state’s red zone rules. Cuomo says no, of course, the mayor disagrees. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo has gone as far as saying that he’ll revoke funding from non-compliant yeshivas, threatening to “withhold funding until the matter is resolved to our satisfaction.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

52% of the city’s public school students are enrolled in remote learning. That’s a 2% increase from last week. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Juneteenth is now an official public holiday in New York State. Governor Cuomo signed it into legislation this week, beating Mayor de Blasio to the punch, who claimed he would make it a holiday in the city by 2021. (Zainab Iqbal for Bklyner)

Apartment Porn: A $6.25 million Brooklyn Heightsfive-bedroom townhouse with a velour reading nook, a backyard, and lots of color. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The NYPD is preparing for election protests according to a new memo issued by Commissioner Dermot Shea. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Attorney General Letitia James is recommending that the NYPD be removed from conducting traffic stops after the fatal shooting of Allan Feliz, whom cops killed during a so-called routine traffic stop in the Bronx last year. Her recommendation is to shift to automated enforcement and redesigning roads to make it harder to speed and break traffic rules. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The New York Philharmonic canceled all of its performances through June 2021. This is an extension of their previous cancelation that was scheduled to end January 5. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

A statue of Ruth Bader Ginsburg is coming to Downtown Brooklyn’s City Point in 2021. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Speaking of statues, check out the new sculpture of Medusa holding the decapitated of Perseus that is now outside the New York County Criminal Courthouse on Centre Street. The sculpture was created by artist Luciano Garbati. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The city has new rules for outdoor dining this winter that will allow for electric heaters, natural gas heaters, and propane heaters. Maybe it’s time to invest in some “restaurant blankets.” (Will Gleason for Time Out)

For now, here’s a list of restaurants with outdoor heating lamps. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Grand Central is looking to alter its rent agreement with its tenants, with the MTA will take a percentage of rent from the restaurants and other small businesses based on gross revenue. Apple won’t be getting a break, just the smaller businesses. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

No need to panic (yet), but State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli said that without federal aid, we’re looking at “the end of regional public transit as we have known it.” (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

What we’re talking about when we say tax the rich. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

“After hearing that I would be kicked out of the Lucerne, I felt traumatized – dehumanized at the thought of being moved from shelter to shelter like a pawn on a chessboard during a global pandemic. The words of the mayor brought back thoughts of traumatic experiences from my past, as a young child growing up in New York City’s foster care system.”
-Shams DaBaron, City’s Move to Vacate UWS Hotel Shelter is Adding ‘Trauma on Top of Trauma,’ Resident Says for City Limits

How to negotiate rent on a city apartment. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

In May, Mayor de Blasio assembled a Surface Transportation Advisory Council to provide suggestions to keep people safe as the city reopens. The mayor has ignored all of their recommendations has not responded to their open letter written on September 1. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s five head “neighborhood policing” effort has done little to slow crime or eliminate racial bias in who gets charged, according to a new study. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

With less than a year in the position, NYPD Chief of Patrol Fausto Pichardo decided to reture. Reports say that he was a “leave the NYPD alone” guy and “always hated the mayor.” (Jake Offenhartz, Jen Chung, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio has denied there was “friction” between him and Pichardo, so you there was friction. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Gallery: The spooky homes of NYC. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Maybe we all need to embrace this makeshift shrine to Mercury that was left at the Utica Ave A/C stop. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Here are the 2020 Tony Award nominees. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The first virtual mayoral forum featuring seven potential mayoral candidates was held this week and there was one thing they all had in common. No one likes the mayor. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The 10 best bánh mì in the city. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)