The Briefly for December 18, 2019 – The “AOC vs Cuomo Round 2: The NYPD Subway Surge” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Mayor de Blasio has another new approach for the city’s homeless population, the hoax that led to an AMBER alert, the most expensive street on the planet, & more

Today – Low: 17˚ High: 37˚
Clear throughout the day.

Search for “de Blasio” “homeless” and “new approach.” Here are some highlights you’ll find:
– Jan 2015: “Shifts Strategy on Homeless Help”
– Dec 2015: “The most comprehensive street homeless outreach effort.”
– Apr 2016: “sweeping homelessness reforms”
– Feb 2017: A “blood and guts” war on homelessness.
– Dec 2017: “playing catch-up on unsheltered homelessness.”
– Mar 2018: an “innovative solution to the crisis.”
– Dec 2019: A new approach addressing street homelessness. (Mark Hellum for amNewYork)

Cluster sites are temporary apartments for the homeless in privately owned buildings and the mayor announced in 2016 that he would end the practice of using them by 2019. There are still 3,000 units of cluster housing in the city. Many nonprofits that operate cluster sites have hundreds or thousands of open violations, and continue to get business from the city despite it. (Joan Goldberg for Brooklyn Eagle)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was one of the leading voices in the effort that killed Amazon’s HQ2. Can AOC help the fight against Governor Cuomo’s NYPD surge in the subways? (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

When the United States misses its targets to reduce climate emissions, New York won’t be on the list of states that caused it to happen. (Aaron Short for Streetsblog)

The best Chinese food on the Upper West Side. (Acrienne Cooper for I Love the Upper West Side)

The scumbag of the week award goes to FDNY lieutenant Christopher Hughes, who was caught stealing from a charity event at a Catholic school fundraiser on Staten Island. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo seeks to redefine conditions under which a person is capable of giving consent, specifically in when someone is drunk. In a steady stream of announcements like a legislative “12 Days of Christmas” the governor has been unveiling one proposal a day leading up to his 2020 State of the State address. (Sarah Midkiff for Refinery29)

Revisiting Le Bernardin, “one of the city’s most thrilling and technically astute restaurants.” (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Everyone got the AMBER alert on Tuesday (unless you’re a monster and turned them off) for Karol Sanchez, who was kidnapped in the Bronx. A few hours later we found out it was a hoax set up by Sanchez as part of a feud with her mother, who she deems to be overprotective. (Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

The video for All I Want for Christmas is You has a New York connection, it was filmed in front of the iconic “Bronx Christmas House.” Unfortunately this year the house is dark for the first time in 46 years. (Ed Garcia Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Harvey Weinstein, NYC’s resident goblin, claims his back hurts too much to deal with a lawsuit to recoup a $45 million loan from him. What a tough year this much have been for him. 🙄 (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The LES, Sunset Park, Gowanus and the rest of the six NYC neighborhoods poised for major change in 2020. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The most expensive street not he planet is 57th St, aka Billionaire’s Row. It end one of four Manhattan streets in the top ten. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Mail-order iconic foods, the foie gras debates, bowl restaurants and all the restaurant trends Adam Platt never wants to see again. (Adam Platt for Grub Street)

There is a second legal fight against an apartment complex that would cast a literal shadow over the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens. A lawsuit is looking to overturn the City council’s approval and force the developer to do an Environmental Impact Survey. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

Falling building debris fatally crushed a 60-year-old woman on West 49th Street and Seventh Avenue in Manhattan on Tuesday morning. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The MTA gave a “sneak peek” at a complete redesign of Queens’ bus system on Monday night with an eye towards less redundancy, easier transfers, and more inter borough options. The full book on the redesign will be released in the spring of 2020. (Angelica Acevedo for amNewYork)

New York City has agreed to pay $12.5 million dollars to settle a class action lawsuit by people who were subject to invasive strip searches while visiting loved ones in jail. (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

The 24-hour NYC diner isn’t dead. Say hello to the new Soho Diner. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Attention NYC Millennials: The suburbs want you! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Here’s how the local centrists in Congress will vote on the impeachment. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

A defense lawyer suggested detectives had badgered and yelled at a 13-year-old boy before he admitted participating in the fatal mugging of Tessa Majors. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

The NYPD will encrypt their radios in 2020, cutting off press from real time reporting and also essentially killing how the Citizen app, Scanner 911, and Broadcastify get their reports. The move seems to fly in the face of the city’s attempts at making the NYPD more transparent and accountable. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

The hidden fees in no fee apartments. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork)

NYPD arrested a truck driver who they say fatally struck bicyclist Matt Travis in East Harlem last month and left the scene. (Eyewitness News)

Time Out New York’s 20 best dishes of 2019. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The Briefly for December 3, 2019 – The “Jet Engine Powered Snow Blowers” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest with standing up to big real estate, the best restaurants in Crown Heights, an NYPD cop walking into a queer dance night with a Trump lanyard, and more.

A truly amazing interactive history of today’s subway map, including the history of the map, its digitization and you may learn a few things along the journey. (Antonio de Luca and Sasha Portis for NY Times)

Bill de Blasio is having an immature fit about Mike Bloomberg’s presidential run. Is it jealousy that Bloomberg’s campaign is more successful than de Blasio’s could ever hope to be or is it that de Blasio has always been petty and petulent when it comes to his predecessor? (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

How does the MTA deal with snowstorms? Jet engine powered snow blowers. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Imagine going to see Slave Play on Broadway to interrupt a Q&A session to complain that the playwright is “racist against white people.” Say hello to Talkback Tammy. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

This was the year that New York state and city government stood up to big real estate interests and made appreciable change. The real estate industry is looking for new ways to influence governmental decisions moving forward. (John Leland for NY Times)

The best restaurants in Crown Heights. (The Infatuation)

The NRA is challenging a city law that was aimed at stopping interstate gun trafficking in the Supreme Court. A decision isn’t expected until June. (Amanda Eisenberg for Politico)

Remember last year’s HOLLAND TONNEL Christmas decoration OCD nightmare? This year’s decorations are much less cringe-worthy. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

Welcome to the Dermot Shea era of the NYPD. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Have you had a package mysteriously disappear from your building? You’re not alone. 90,000 packages go missing every day. (Winnie Hu and Matthew Haag for NY Times)

The “Brooklyn’s Fyre Festival” nightmare is never-ending. Arch-villain and architect of the Frozen Fare Festival Lena Romanova is suing the Brooklyn Daily Eagle for defamation for its coverage of Winterfest, the winter shitshow to end all winter shitshows at the Brooklyn Museum one year ago. Winterfest is, thankfully, never coming back. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

An NYPD officer walked into a queer dance night in Jackson Heights for an inspection wearing a Trump lanyard on Sunday. Officers are required to remain politically neutral and as a result their commander is investigating the inspection. (Max Parrott for QNS)

The homes in Ozone Park that were flooded with the city’s raw sewage have been pumped from the basements and officials are blaming the backup on a possible “Fatberg.” (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Stay ho ho home. SantaCon is coming. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

10 new public art installations to see this month. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: The Empire State Building’s new $165 million 80th floor observatory is open. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A first look at the new Rockefeller Center pedestrian zones. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The York Street F-line station may be one of the city’s most potentially dangerous. The station serves 14,000 workers and 4,000 residents who travel through the station’s single stairwell with no escalator, elevator, or second exit. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

CitiBike’s pedal assisted electric bikes are coming back “this winter,” breaking the promise for a fall return. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The Eater 38, 38 restaurants that define New York City’s dining scene right now, has been updated with Williamsburg’s Gertie making the list. (Eater)

The Briefly for October 24, 2019 – The “De Blasio Goes to War With the Lower East Side” Edition

The city is retiming traffic lights for cyclists, the special ingredients in the city’s water, it’s worth freaking out about Wegmans, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Want to live somewhere affordable, but still be in the city? Check out these 15 Queens streets, which are some of the most affordable in the city. (QNS.com)

The Union Square tech hub has a new name. Is Zero Irving any better of a name? (Curbed)

With the highest body count of cyclists killed by drivers in the city in twenty years, the city has begun to reconfigure the timing of traffic lights to better cater to cyclists to make the streets safer. (NY Times)

The mayor’s latest war is against the Lower East Side, with a new “quality of life” campaign for a six-block area that encompasses more than 80 bars and restaurants. They’re using a name that rolls right off the tongue: The Late-Night Quality of Life Improvement Plan. (Curbed)

10 hidden gems in Crown Heights. (Untapped New York)

A chill in the air means it’s the first hints of cuffing season. Here are 10 date ideas you can do on a Citi Bike. (Bushwick Daily)

The ice skating rinks in Central Park have dropped their Trump branding, but make no mistakes, they’ll still be operated by the Trump Organization. Turns out having Trump’s name on things doesn’t help business in New York City. (Curbed)

I don’t think that a Wegmans opening in Brooklyn is a big deal, but my wife who grew up upstate insists that I am very wrong and it’s worth freaking out about Wegmans. (Eater)

The troubled Squibb Bridge that connected Brooklyn Heights to Brooklyn Bridge Park has been demolished after opening in 2013, closing in 2014 and not opening again until 2017 and then closed again in 2018. (Curbed)

A guide on where to eat, drink, shop, and more in Industry City. (StreetEasy)

To combat the high number of NYPD suicides this year, the department is offering free, confidential mental health care as part of the “Finest Care” program. (Patch)

What’s in the city’s water that makes it taste so great? It might be the 270 cancer, brain damage, and pregnancy complicating chemicals found in a recent study by the Environmental World Group. (Patch)

Where to go when you’ve got a blind date. (The Infatuation)