The Briefly for May 31, 2019 – The “Stuyshwick? This is a Joke, Right?” Edition

The weekend subways, the NYPD has been lying to the public about rape numbers, a look at the art in the echoes of the Stonewall Inn riots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions have been pretty light for the last few weeks. That ends this weekend with 13 different subway lines carrying some variety of change in service to kick off June. (Subway Weekender)

The NYPD has been lying to the public for years about the number of rapes committed in NYC. While telling the public there were 6,626 rapes in a four and a half year span, they told federal officials there were 10,649 rapes. What the hell is going on with the 38% discrepancy? The NYPD only reports vaginal penetration as rape, not anal or oral. This would preclude the inclusion of any rape committed against men from this number. With this uncertainty, the one thing that is clear is that the NYPD is setting itself to fail when it comes to cases of rape in the city. (Gothamist)

Oh god. Someone is sincerely trying to make Stuyshwick a thing (where Bushwick and Bed-Stuy meet on Broadway under the J train). Anyway, here’s a “guide” to the “neighborhood.” (Grub Street)

Whoever thought of this moronic name should look back to 2013, when BEDWICK topped Time Out’s list of the dumbest fake neighborhood names. (Time Out)

After nearly a decade in the making, a pedestrian bridge replacing the Rector Street bridge finally open this fall. (Curbed)

Seven places to celebrate the 200th birthday of Walt Whitman today. (Untapped Cities)

The City Council approved two bills aimed at making streets safer. One will hold the DOT accountable to add safety design elements to any street being redesigned and the second would require any contractors to create temporary bike lanes when disrupting any pre-existing lanes. (Curbed)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 9 appears to be on the verge of falling apart, as the search to fill the empty since 2015 role of district manager was about to be debated, three board members staged a walkout. The walkout resulted in less than a quorum, ending the meeting immediately. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Everyone wants a say in the Gowanus rezoning, the latest voice to want a seat at the table is the EPA. (Curbed)

The beginning of the end of the MetroCard officially begins today. (Gothamist)

If you’re confronted with an OMNY screen, here’s how to use your phone to pay for your subway ride. Until it is available at every station you can only pay per ride. (Patch)

You’ve probably heard that the city’s water is the cleanest of anywhere in the state. It’s not a rumor. It’s the truth. (Patch)

A look inside the $5.5 million makeover of Central Park’s SummerStage. (amNY)

Brace yourself, this one’s got a sad ending. The eight-month-old puppy who escaped his harness and jumped down onto the subway tracks at Herald Square was found dead near where he first escaped. Marley’s human companions are blaming the MTA. (Gothamist)

Seventeen years after the cleanup of Ground Zero was completed, a modest ceremony was held at the new Memorial Glade dedicated to the people whose related illnesses and deaths have followed in the subsequent years. (NY Times)

Following yesterday’s assessment of how NYU and Columbia’s neighborhoods are fresh hell when it comes to renting, here are the most affordable neighborhoods for fresh college graduates. (Curbed)

It’s the city’s fanciest McDonald’s, three stories tall, walls of glass, and open 24 hours a day. (Eater)

“Tastes of Brooklyn” is coming to Crown Heights’ Franklin Ave this Sunday, a street that inspired a joke of a podcast. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The city’s Lyft and Uber cars cause more pollution than cabs, thanks to the city’s hybrid fleet. The city’s 13,500 taxi emissions dropped 82% in 15 years. (Gizmodo)

Gravity knives are no longer illegal in New York. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Measles cases are at a 25 year high, with more than half of the nation’s cases being in the city. (NY Times)

The World Pride Mural Project Initiative has brought a new Buff Monster mural at the corner of Chrystie St & Broome St to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. (Brooklyn Street Art)

As we roll into June, the city’s streets, art galleries, and museums are focusing on the art centered on the riot/rebellion/resistance/uprising at the Stonewall Inn 50 years ago. The Times’ co-chief art critic looks at the historical significance that moment at the Stonewall Inn has had and how it has reverberated through art for half a century. (NY Times)

The BQX is such a pipe dream that advocates are pinning their hopes on a Democrat taking over the presidency in 2021 so the project has a remote chance of receiving the $1.3 billion necessary to cover just under half of the cost of the project. (Gothamist)

17 LGBTQ landmarks of Greenwich Village (6sqft)

Stolen: One orange bearded dragon. (Gothamist)

Behind the scene photos from Hart Island: The city’s mass burial ground. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to Jacob Riis Park Beach for the summer of 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go on a Saturday when you want to do something but don’t have plans. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for April 1, 2019 – The “Congestion Pricing is Not An April Fools Joke” Edition

Participatory budgeting is here, a look at the state’s budget, the MTA starts cleaning up elevated tracks, the NYC brunch directory, and more in today’s daily NY news edition.

Quick note: There are no April Fools articles listed today.

Late night subway work this week will affect the 1, 3, 6, D, F, N, R, and G trains. (Subway Changes)

The state’s $175 billion budget passed early on Sunday, including cash bail reforms, a new mansion tax, a plastic bag ban, a property tax cap, and congestion pricing. (NY Times)

What you need to know about the state’s plastic bag ban. (Grub Street)

What’s not included in the state’s budget? Mobile sports betting. (NY Post)

Seven takeaways from the state budget. (NY Times)

It’s time to vote in participatory budgeting! There is $35 million to spend in the 32 communities in the city and you have a say in how it’s spent, and you can vote online! (nyc.gov)

Once you’ve voted, you can submit your own idea for the next cycle, like this idea for new bike racks. (PBNYC)

With the Hudson Yards open, the city has turned its eyes towards the next railroad yard to develop in Sunnyside, Queens. (Sunnyside Post)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants. (amNY)

An ode to the longtime neighborhood bar and what the loss of it means for the city. (Curbed)

Citi Bike is headed to where it’s never been before: Bushwick. (Gothamist)

Add the D train to the list of trains you want to steer clear of walking underneath. The MTA announced it will start cleaning the undersides of the D train’s elevated tracks after the 7 train started raining subway parts last month. The work is starting from the Stillwell Ave station. (Bklyner)

A history of NYC’s 13 triangle buildings. (Untapped Cities)

Summer school, but this is actually interesting. Prospect Park is looking or immigrant professors, researches, and lecturers to teach their “Open Air University,” which runs from June 11 to June 30. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Summerhill, Crown Heights’ “bullet hole” bar, has closed. (News 12)

Smorgasburg is coming back to its outdoor locations and Time Out has some suggestions about what you’re gonna want to taste. Here’s the full list of vendors/a>. (Time Out)

Former Knicks star Kristaps Porzingis has been accused of rape. Porzingis claims the encounter was consensual. (amNY)

Sink your sweet tooth into Godiva’s midtown cafe, opening on April 18. (Eater)

It’s estimated 90,000 to 230,000 birds die in the city as a result of colliding with glass buildings. A proposed bill would require 90% of glass in new and altered buildings to be treated to reduce bird fatalities. (Curbed)

Inside the battle to fight off invasive species washing down the Bronx River from Westchester. (NY Times)

6sqft is hiring!

Should you wash your hands after being on the subway? No, because except Brooklyn. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Former Assemblymember Dov Hikind is blaming a Bklyner reporter for organizing the protest against Councilmember Kalman Yeger’s comments that Palestine “doesn’t exist.” (Bklyner)

There’s at least one benefit of living in Staten Island: it only costs you $5.50 to cross the Verrazzano to Brooklyn. If you’re a Brooklynite (or anyone else), it’ll cost you $19. (Bklyner)

A deep dive into Industry City’s effect on Sunset Park and UPROSE, a decades-old community group whose goal was always to revitalize that area as a manufacturing hub. (The Indypendent)

If you have someone who always wants to go to brunch but never has an idea of where to go: The NYC Brunch Directory. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 14, 2019 – The “Don’t Quit Your Day Job, Mr. Mayor” Edition

Stop and frisk is down but not any less worrisome, the best pies for pi day, a 40 year old murder mystery buried in a Queens backyard, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Stop and frisks are reportedly down 98%. Turns out the remaining 2% are just as problematic as they used to be with only 11% of people stopped being white. (amNY)

From 2001’s plan for the 2012 Olympics to this Friday’s opening, a timeline on the major moments for the Hudson Yards. (Curbed)

In honor of pi day – the best pies in the city. (Grubstreet)

Mayor de Blasio’s budget for 2020 looks like a series of austerity measures for the city. (The Independent)

Forget it Jake, it’s Raccoon Town. (NY Post)

Plenty of New Yorkers give the finger when they’re upset, but taking a finger? That bites. (Gothamist)

Even though no one wants him to run and he’s polling at a literal zero, Mayor de Blasio said he won’t quit his day job if he decides to run for president. (NY Post)

A BQE replacement alternative idea from City Comptroller Scott Stringer: A temporary “trucks only” highway with a park on top. (Gothamist)

After 35 years, Park Slope’s Old Carriage Inn’s last day is St. Patrick’s Day. (Bklyner)

Wolverine is returning to Broadway. (amNY)

There’s an ongoing shortage of blood, and before you begin your partying on Sunday, there’s a blood drive at Our Lady of Mt Carmel Church. (Greenpointers)

No one’s sure how this baby goat ended up on the Gowanus Expressway, but it was safely captured. (Gothamist)

Photos from in and around the Hudson Yard’s ‘Vessel’ sculpture. (Patch)

The best restaurants in Crown Heights. (Grubstreet)

Moishe’s and closing is the Ross and Rachel of 2019. Turns out it’s not closing, despite what Moishe Perl told reporters. It should be open in six to eight weeks after renovations. (Eater)

An interview with Dan Smith, who WILL teach you guitar. (Gothamist)

New York City’s elite were caught up in “Operation Varsity Blues,” they just weren’t Aunt Rebecca on Roseanne. (Gothamist)

Coney Island’s Shore Theater will become a hotel thanks to a thumbs up from the Landmarks Preservation Commission. There’s no timeline yet, but it’ll be good to see that scaffolding come down one day. (Curbed)

It’s the Bronx” is aiming to be the “SXSW of the Bronx.” (6sqft)

Do you deserve your seat on the subway more than someone else? (Gothamist)

You know that body cam recording of an NYPD cop giving her boss a hummer? Yeah, it was a fake. (NY Post)

More Anti-Semitic graffiti, this time in the Nassau Avenue stop on the G train on an ad for a book about the Notorious RBG. (Greenpointers)

The Chrysler… hotel? (Gothamist)

It’s all under a cloak of mystery, but four members of the City Council are under investigation for possible misconduct. (Patch)

Isabella Goodwin: From police matron to the city’s first female police detective. (NY Times)

A farm grows in Brownsville. (The Brooklyn Reader)

How Manhattan’s streets and avenues are numbered. Yes, it’s more than just “Manhattan’s a grid.” (StreetEasy)

The City Council is looking to make the city’s lead inspection regulations the toughest in the nation with a set of 10 new bills. (Patch)

Just a list of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s humanizing moments. (amNY)

The NYPD is investigating a 40-year-old mystery after a body was dug up in a backyard in Queens. (NY Times)

Where to go with someone who’s “just reaching out” to see how you like working at your company. (The Infatuation)

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