The Briefly for January 9, 2019 – The “Great Pizza Recipe Caper of 2019” Edition

The mayor wants to give healthcare to all, Corey johnson wants control of the subways and buses, $26 million was saved in rent thanks to the L train shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Threats of the L train shutdown saved renters in Williamsburg over $26 million in rent. A different version of this story could say “The L train shutdown cost landlords over $26 in rent. (Metro)

“Back of a taxi” is becoming a popular birth spot, with the second baby of the year being delivered while the meter was running. (NY Post)

The second large scale project Staten Island has lost in the last few months when the developers of the Riverside Galleria withdrew their plans after facing pressure from politicians. (The Real Deal)

For now, it seems like you can get a taste of Nolita uptown. The man behind Prince Street Pizza is suing a former chef for allegedly stealing the recipe for his famous spicy pepperoni slice and bringing it to the former chef’s new restaurant Made in New York Pizza on the Upper West Side. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio announce that the city will spend $100 million to provide health care for undocumented immigrants and others who cannot qualify for insurance. His vision is that the city would provide comprehensive care to everyone, including 300,000 undocumented New Yorkers. (NY Times)

The debate over Amazon’s HQ2 has unions squaring off with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union’s opposition at odds over the project with the Service Employees International Union and the Building and Construction Trades Council’s support. (The Real Deal)

The best coffee shops for meetings. (The Infatuation)

Welcome to 2019: the home of New York’s worst measles outbreak in decades. (NY Post)

It’s seemed inevitable that Willits Point was headed towards mega-development, but that inevitability has loomed overhead decades. A stadium for the Mets, a mall, and now the Queensborough Football Club have laid claim to the neighborhood, despite decade-old plans for mixed-income housing. (Gothamist)

SNL’s Michael Che is putting together “A Night for NYCHA” this Friday at Irving Plaza to benefit the Fund for Public Housing, featuring Jeff Ross, Michelle Wolf and a “top secret” lineup of comedians. There is a GoFundMe page for people who can’t attend but still want to donate (amNY)

A lawsuit was dismissed that claimed that Danny Meyer sat atop a New York restaurateur illuminati-esque group which sought to pocket tips intended for their staffs. (Eater)

Whatever happened to the toxic dust the MTA claimed would make a partial L train shutdown impossible? (Gothamist)

A Bronx pedestrian was killed by a driver of a city sanitation truck who was preemptively salting Willis Avenue at E. 138th Street. The driver was suspended and is cooperating with the NYPD. (Streetsblog)

What you need to know about the city’s special election for public advocate. (Curbed)

A dog museum? A dog museum. The AKC Museum of the Dog is opening on February 8 at 101 Park Avenue, bringing paintings, prints, sculptures, porcelain figurines, displays and more to two floors, including the first exhibition “For the Love of All Things Dog.” (USA Today)

Mario Batali, famous for orange Crocs, an apology that pairs with pizza dough cinnamon rolls, and being accused of sexual misconduct, will not be facing criminal charges for two sexual assaults that allegedly took place in 2004 and 2005. (Eater)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will reveal a plan to wrestle control of the MTA’s subways and buses from the MTA within the next two months. Will he shutdown the shutdown of the shutdown? (Streetsblog)

A judge blocked Mayor de Blasio’s attempt to move carriage horses inside Central Park instead of being alongside cars on the streets. A full hearing will take place February 8. (NY Post)

Politicians can’t constitutionally block critics on official social media accounts. Looking at you State Senator Kevin “Kill Yourself” Parker and City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. (Metro)

38 essential restaurants, winter edition. (Eater)

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The Briefly for June 20, 2018 – Curbing Arrests for Smoking Weed, Chelsea Guitars Gets to Stay, Lead Paint on the 7, and More

NYPD will start issuing tickets for people caught smoking weed on September 1, Simcha Felder runs away from a mother, the New York Pizza Festival, and more

Watch State Senator Simcha Felder ignore and run away from a mother whose child died by a speeding motorist in 2013. The Every School Speed Camera Act would put speeding cameras near 290 schools throughout the city, which has been proven to reduce speeding by 63% in New York. The bill cleared the state assembly but Felder is one of the people preventing a vote in the senate. Felder is a Democrat that caucuses with the Republicans.

“The NYPD has no interest in arresting people for marijuana offenses when those arrests have no direct impact on public safety.” -NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill. The new policy of issuing tickets instead of an arresting will be enforced beginning September 1.

Don’t eat the paint chips falling off the elevated 7 train. The MTA will start to remove lead paint from the 7 train’s elevated tracks in Queens between 82nd St and 103rd St. The paint used on the elevated tracks and structures is over 50x what is considered safe.

City Hall Park, Mount Pitt, Vauxhall Gardens, and the other must-see spots from NYC’s first guidebook in 1807.

25 must-visit historic LGBTQ sites in NYC from Curbed.

Brownsville and its parks failed 10 of the 14 benchmarks from New Yorkers for Parks’ Brownsville Open Space Index. Two years ago Mayor de Blasio announced that Betsy Head Park would be receiving a portion of a $30 million investment as one of five “anchor parks” in the city, which means a two year closure of Brownsville’s biggest park.

Underground Heroes: New York Transit In Comics” is the Transit Museum’s latest exhibit in Downtown Brooklyn. The exhibit celebrates the subways as depicted in comics and includes Winsor McCay, Will Eisner, Bill Griffith, Roz Chast, Ronald Wimberly and Julia Wertz.

Humanhattan 2050 proposes new infrastructure in Lower Manhattan to safeguard the waterfront for the next hundred years and make the area more accessible and enjoyable at a cost of $335 million.

We’re inching closer to the latest closures of subway stations for renovations. 57th Street is hit on July 9th, 28th Street closes on July 16, and 23rd Street on July 23. There are five new stations on the list but don’t have dates: 145th Street on the 3, Penn Station 1, 2, 3 (how is that even possible?), 174th-175th Streets D and 167th Street D in the Bronx.

New York Pizza Festival’s organizers promise this year’s event won’t be the “Fyre Festival of Pizza.”

Chelsea Guitars was given a stay of execution by the Chelsea Hotel’s owners.

How to choose and install an air conditioner in NYC from 6sqft.

Danny Meyer and Union Square Hospitality Group are pushing forward on banning cash at their restaurants. Meyers argue that the benefits of people who can afford credit cards outweighs the impact on customers who can only pay with cash.

Filming Around Town: The Kichen, starring Melissa McCarthy, is at Nostrand Ave and Avenue P Brooklyn and 33rd St and Ave S, The Sun is Also the Star, starring Yara Shahidi, is at W 124th and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd, and John Wick 3, starring Theodore “Ted” Logan, is at Coffey St and Ferris St in Brooklyn.

Do you know how to do a “Bronx Cheer?”


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