The Briefly for October 29, 2019 – The “Seven Years Since Hurricane Sandy” Edition

Italian AOC, Corey Johnson’s Master Plan is expected to pass City Council, the best ramen, dogs in Halloween costumes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Popeyes chicken sandwich returns on Sunday. An excellent pairing with early voting. (Gothamist)

Reminder: Early voting continues all week. (QNS.com)

You can go to the Village to watch the Halloween parade if you’re a masochist, but NY1 will broadcast the parade and there’s a live webcam you can fire up if you can’t “borrow” someone’s Spectrum password. Enjoy costume spotting without braving the rain, people, or the subway ride home. (Curbed)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson’s “Streets Master Plan” is expected to pass City Council this week, which would add 250 miles of protected bike lanes and 150 dedicated bus lanes to the city. (6sqft)

The mayor supports the plan, but only as long as he doesn’t have to preside over it. The first year of the plan would be 2021, the first year the city would be free from de Blasio’s mayorship. (Gothamist)

Data continues to show traffic on 13th St has not gotten any worse than it was before the 14th St busway. (Streetsblog)

Here’s how NYC is preparing for the next Hurricane Sandy. (Curbed)

Industry City’s 6.6-million-square-foot expansion plan and renderings have been revealed. (New York YIMBY)

Photos: Check out all the good pups in the Fort Greene dog costume contest. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Domestic violence is the leading causing of homelessness in the city. 41% of people entering shelters from July 2017 through July 2018 did so following a domestic violence incident. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

One in ten of the city’s 1.1 million students is homeless, according to the New York State Technical and Education Assistance Center for Homeless Students. (Patch)

Photos: “What’s the big deal about Wegmans?  Am I missing something?” was a text I got from a friend on Monday morning. I honestly couldn’t tell you but it’s hard to argue with the droves of people who showed up in the rain. (Gothamist)

The mayor made a big deal about having “the talk” with his son when it comes to dealing with the police during his failed presidential campaign, but what he didn’t talk about was the more than half a dozen times he had the NYPD drive his son to and from Yale or pick him up at Penn Station when he decided to take the train. The mayor denies this. (Patch)

Photos: The 16th annual Bike Kill, a gathering of “mutant bicycles,” originated by the Black Label Bicycle Club. (Gothamist)

8 of New York City’s spookiest abandoned sites. (6sqft)

There is mounting support for a ban of non-essential helicopter flights around the city, ending the steady stream of sightseeing rides around lower Manhattan and Uber’s new “taxi” service to JFK. (Brooklyn Paper)

Photos: More from Great PUPkin Halloween Parade in Fort Greene Park. (Gothamist)

Winter is usually the quiet time of year to rent in the city, but there are indications that this year will be tougher than usual. (StreetEasy)

A plan to regulate hotels south of Union Square is being met with mixed reactions. According to City Councilmember Carlina Rivera, the plan would protect neighborhoods against outsized commercial developments like the Moxy Hotel on East 11th St, but it’s met with skepticism that it would instead encourage the development of office buildings. (Curbed)

Why hip hop began in the Bronx. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Add a tugboat to the things that need to be removed from the Gowanus Canal. The boat started taking on water during Sunday’s rain, eventually becoming almost entirely submerged. (Curbed)

Meet Roger the Sloth, the newest resident at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: Does this arrest on the subway go too far? Guns were drawn amid a crowded car to arrest a man for fare evasion. (HuffPost)

The 7th annual Barnacle Parade will be held today (Tuesday) from 4-9 pm in Red Hook on Van Brunt St celebrating the neighborhood’s resiliency in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The City Council voted to suspend Andy King for 30 days and fine him $15,000 after a report substantiated a whole list of claims against the member from the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Italian AOC is the best meme of the week. (Twitter)

It’s almost a cliche to hear a company say “unionizing won’t solve the workers’ concerns,” but here we are and of all companies to put that message forward, it’s Housing Works. (NY Times)

Would you be surprised to hear that Mayor Bill de Blasio’s dead presidential run was paid for by donors with city interests? (Politico)

25 of the best ramen bowls in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 15, 2019 – The “I’ve Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway” Edition

Our absent mayor was absent during the blackout, the reinvention of the rainbow cookie, de Blasio hires his son to save his 0% campaign, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The late-night disruptions this week are minimal unless you’re on the L train in Brooklyn. Service is suspended between Lorimer and Broadway Junction. (Subway Weekender)

A gallery of how broadway shows and professional musicians handled the blackout, along with New Yorkers stepping up to direct traffic, and a video of the lights turning back on. (Huff Post)

When the power went out, the first question was “why?” The second question was where the hell is our mayor? (NY Times)

Where was the mayor? He has an average 0% support and yet he was spending the day in Iowa. (Politico)

When he was asked on the air on CNN at 9 pm, two hours after the blackout began the mayor said he was still weighing his options. (Politico)

While a portion of the city sat in darkness, it was Corey Johnson that provided public leadership on the news, Twitter, and during Sunday’s press conference. Our absentee mayor continued to be absent. (Chelsea Now)

Want to live in a city where you can save money for a rainy day? Too bad, you live in New York. (CNBC)

If you’re the person that’s been praying for consistent hot temperatures, this is the week where all your friends will give you the side-eye. Welcome to the first sweltering week of summer. (amNY)

The state legislature passed the Utility Responsibility Bill and now it waits for the governor’s signature. The bill would protect homeowners if any damage was done to their property by utility companies. (QNS)

Do you know the difference between a studio and a one-bedroom apartment? Did you know a bedroom needs to be a minimum of 80 square feet with a ceiling height minimum of eight feet? (StreetEasy)

R. Kelly has been arrested and indicted of racketeering and violating federal anti-sex trafficking laws. These are in addition to the charges he’s facing in Illinois. He faces up to 70 years in prison. (Patch)

The rainbow cookie is already perfect, but some chefs can’t leave well-enough alone. (Eater)

Whoever the monster is that stole the key to the city received by Allie Long, a member of the US Women’s National Team, understand that you have made very powerful enemies. (Gothamist)

Your landlord can threaten to let your apartment fall into disrepair, but they can’t actually do that. Learn about the warranty of habitability and what it means for your apartment. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health includes “BKLYN Wild” in the Time Out Market, which broke the 100 violation point mark with a 102 score. (Patch)

Governor Cuomo, who has insisted that he is not in control of the MTA, has they need you to adopt or foster an animal. (amNY)

This Saturday is the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon and the city is celebrating multiple ways. (Gothamist)

Inside a mostly abandoned mall in Queens, Board of Elections worker are counting out the fate of the Queens District Attorney’s office. (Gothamist)

A lawsuit is challenging the legality of the “spot rezoning” that was necessary to allow the 80 Flatbush development project a reality. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Abel Cedeno says he had been bullied for being gay, took the stand in his own defense at his manslaughter trial for the murder of two of his high school classmates with a knife. (NY Times)

The city unveiled its plans to protect the east side of Manhattan from the Lower East Side to 25th St with the design of the East River Park. The East Side Coastal Resiliency Project’s walls and design would protect the area from a 16 foot level of sea rise, which is the “100-year flood + waves” level. (Curbed)

A human leg was found in a channel in the waters of Coney Island. (Brooklyn Paper)

If you think you apply for affordable housing in the city, registration is a fairly simple process. (Curbed)

The city council’s Committee on Small Business is calling on Letitia James’s office to look at the settlement agreement that allowed Grub Hub to buy Seamless in 2013 in light of the reports about Grub Hub’s business tactics. (Grub Street)

JetBlue installed Does Starbucks sell newspapers? If you answered no, you’ll soon be proven right because the company announced that they will stop selling The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and USA Today at its 8,600 locations nationwide. (NY Times)

RIP Hector Figueroa, former president of the Service Employees International Union and a key player in the fight for a $15 minimum wage. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio is polling at a 0% average in the Democrat presidential primary. Will hiring his son help his campaign? It literally couldn’t hurt it. (NY Times)

A preliminary report is suggesting that the impending MTA overhaul reduce the number of groups within the organization from 40 into six departments to centralize and simplify. The MTA’s board is expected to vote on a final version of the plan on the 24th. (amNY)

The President’s ICE enforcement action started on Saturday in the city, but early reports indicate that no one opened their doors for ICE and as a result, no one was detained. (amNY)

The race to replace José E. Serrano after he steps down as a result of a Parkinson’s disease diagnosis will be contended by Ruben Diaz Sr, an openly homophobic city councilperson, and Ritchie J Torres, the first openly gay person to hold office in the Bronx. (NY Times)

Need a late-night fix and you already had pizza for lunch? A list of late-night delivery spots that aren’t just pizza. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for July 2, 2019 – The “One of the Worst Run Big Cities in America!” Edition

The CBD ban is kind-of in effect, the 14th St busway lawsuit gets pushback, the best lunch spots in Midtown East, the Seamless controversy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Start putting your July 4th travel plans together, even if you’re not planning on leaving the city, because subways, streets, buses, and ferries will all be affected by holiday changes. (Curbed)

Congrats to presidential candidate and sometimes-in-NYC mayor Bill de Blasio. New York City is one of the worst run big cities in America! (Patch)

After the Shalimar Diner closed in November, a Facebook group called “Save the Shalimar Diner” wanted to… you know, save the Shalimar Diner. Cue 1986 Met Lenny Dykstra, who is (kind of) saving it by moving the whole thing to Long Island. (Untapped Cities)

Construction debris fell from the 12th story of a nearby apartment building still being finished through the roof of Mission Delores, the popular Park Slope bar, on Sunday, seriously injuring a woman who was in the bar. Mission Delores is closed until further notice and the woman who was struck is breathing with the assistance of a tube at Brooklyn Methodist Hospital. (Eater)

8 new outdoor art installations for July. (Untapped Cities)

Dante de Blasio wrote an op-ed in today’s USA Today about “the talk” his father had with him about dealing with the police that was mentioned in last week’s presidential primary debate. The head of the Police Benevolent Associaton called the mayor’s remarks “shameful.” (USA Today)

Eater wanted to know if L&B Spumoni Garden is still good. Turns out it is! (Eater)

The city is nearly doubling its monetary support for the LGBT community with funding for Trans Equity Programs, LGBT community services, and LGBT inclusive curriculums in public schools. (6sqft)

Here’s what you need to know about the Grub Hub/Seamless website buying controversy that erupted last week. Grub Hub has been finding new and creative ways to rip off local restaurants, including registering fake websites in their names and tricking customers. (Grub Street)

Playing ping-pong on the subway. Fun idea or public nuisance? (Gothamist)

The president doesn’t seem to know Letitia James’s name, but he certainly knows he thinks she’s being used by Governor Cuomo against him. (Patch)

The count of people who’ve died in car crashes while riding bicycles is up to 15 in 2019. 29-year-old Devra Freelander was hit and killed by a 70-year-old cement truck driver in Bushwick. (Streetsblog)

The number of dead bicyclists on city streets was 10 for all of 2018, the mayor says Vision Zero, which strives to “use every tool at its disposal to improve the safety of our streets,” will still be viewed as a success this year. (Gothamist)

The opposition to the 14th Street busway has some opposition of its own. An advocacy group supporting the busway slammed the lawsuit that blocked the busway from taking effect on July 1 as classist, citing the average rider of the M14 has an income of $28,455/year and are people of color. (amNY)

Reaching-Out in Bensonhurst is a food pantry that has provided food and social service referrals to people in need for 30 years but due to a shortage of funds has had to turn away hungry families. The shortage is due to stagnant funding. They currently serve 9,800 families and are always open to donations. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you have $13 million, you can own something almost no one in NYC has: your own set of private islands. (NY Times)

The city’s ban on CBD was promised at the beginning of the year for July 1. Now that it’s July, the Department of Health claims that it is cracking down, but they won’t issues fines until October 1. (amNY)

If you’re looking for the city’s biggest asshole, you wouldn’t be wrong to start looking at whoever decided to create this $250 hot dog. (Gothamist)

What does Midtown need? How about an 800-foot tall tower right on top of Macy’s? (NY Times)

The mayor will honor the late Det. Luis Alvarez, who recently died at 53 due to 9/11-related cancer, with a key to the city. (amNY)

A former high school student was awarded nearly $60 million in damages on Monday after a Manhattan jury found the city’s Department of Education and his former teacher liable for an accident that left much of his body scarred from third-degree burns. (NY Times)

A non-NIMBY argument against City Councilmember Brad Lander’s “YIMBY Junk.” (Red Hook Star-Revue)

The days of speeding without consequence in the city is coming to an end. The city is installing 2,000 speed cameras within a quarter mile of schools, which are practically everywhere. Anyone going 10 mph over the posted speed limit will get a $50 ticket. Critics say that turning the entire city into a speed trap won’t save lives, but anyone who gets a $50 ticket in the mail will start driving differently. (NY Times)

Where to get lunch in Midtown East. (The Infatuation)

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