The Briefly for May 26, 2020 – The “Summer of Cannibalistic Rats” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It’s gonna be a hot and wet summer, de Blasio sets the city’s thresholds for reopening, where to get frozen cocktails, Melinda Katz breaks a promise, & more

Today – Low: 60˚ High: 72˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

The city remains on PAUSE, with 4/7 metrics met.

Here’s a beginner’s guide to biking to the beach, for the uninitiated. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

ConEd says the city should expect higher than usual electricity bills this summer in a combination of people being home more often and an increase in supply charges. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Also, this summer is predicted to unusually hotter and rainier than usual. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Why stop the bad news train now? This year’s hurricane season has been described as “brutal,” with double the number of hurricanes expected with six major storms and 19 named storms expected in total. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The bad news train keeps on rolling. The city’s rats have depended on the trash from restaurants for hundreds of generations, with restaurants either closed or producing much less food waste, rats are getting desperate and aggressive. They don’t pose a threat to humans but are turning on each other, turning to cannibalization. (Mariel Padilla for NY Times)

The city will be contacting you if you’ve had exposure using the same technology that Uber uses to text you that your driver is arriving. (Rachel Kraus for Mashable)

Queens DA Melinda Katz is breaking one of her campaign promises less than a year into office. While campaigning, Katz claimed she supported the legalization of sex work, but according to DecrimNY she has been targeting the buyers of sex work as part of her new Human Trafficking Bureau. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Errick Allen, an NYPD officer, was arrested on murder charges for fatally shooting his childhood friend in the head on Long Island. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re looking for a new apartment and pizza is your #1 priority, here are listings available near some of the city’s best pizzerias. (Localize.City)

As part of a new four-part plan to support nursing homes during the pandemic, the city will offer on-site COVID-19 testing to patients and staff at all 169 nursing homes across the city. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Every public school student in New York City will soon receive $420 to help pay for food while school buildings are shut down, regardless of family income. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

The NYPD’s enforcement of social distancing measures continues to hit black and brown New Yorkers hardest, according to new data gleaned by the Legal Aid Society. (Mark Hallum for Brooklyn Paper)

The city has opened up 45 miles of open streets in May, surprisingly exceeding its own goal for the month. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio set new thresholds for the city to begin reopening, separate from the state’s thresholds. Fewer than 200 daily hospitalizations, fewer than 375 patients in the ICU, and a positive testing rate below 15%, all for at least 10 to 14 days. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

It’s not the mayor’s decision on when the city reopens, as Governor Cuomo said in a press conference on Friday “it’s a statewide decision across the board.” The city’s guidelines, if met before the state’s, only serve to confuse. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

More than 100,000 small businesses have shut down permanently since the start of the pandemic, so the state is putting forward over $100 million towards a loan program for small businesses to help them amid the pandemic. Pre-applications start today. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Anybody who believes they have symptoms or who has been in contact with somebody who has tested positive is now urged to be tested for Covid-19. Here’s how to get tested. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

At this point it seems like people are expecting Councilmember Brad Lander and Mayor de Blasio to botch the Gowanus rezoning. With both leaving power in 2021, will they rush a poorly-thought plan through or will both of their legacies be an empty promise for the neighborhood? (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

New York will pay death benefits for essential government workers who lost their lives to novel coronavirus. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What is the “new normal?” No one knows yet, but it could look something like the wall of vending machines full of N95 masks on Delancey Street. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Swimming at the city’s beaches remains banned, but the City Council is working on guidelines to help open the city’s waters to swimmers. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Video: A walk through an empty Grand Central Terminal. (ActionKid)

The woman who started the #ClapForOurCarers at 7 pm says it’s time to stop. Annemarie Plas says that people have shown their appreciation and its time for people in power to reward them and give them the respect they deserve. Plas started the clapping in the UK, we’ll see if her calls for it to stop are heard across the Atlantic. (Derrick Bryson Taylor for NY Times)

Daci Zudi was riding his bike when he was hit and killed by Faustino Rebollar Garcia, driving his pickup truck. For the death of Zudi, Garcia was charged with failure to exercise due care and driving without a license, both minor charges. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

If you’ve got a soft spot for doughnuts, three Doughnut Plan locations have reopened. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The governor allowed religious gatherings of 10 or fewer people at the end of last week and was sued by the New York Civil Liberties Union, forcing the governor to change his executive order to allow non-essential gatherings of ten or fewer people across the state. The NYCLU seems to be pushing that responsibly distanced protests should be allowed, but it’s difficult to not see this being bused in other ways. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Where to get frozen cocktails. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The amazing story of Alice, the elephant who escaped from Coney Island and swam the five miles to Staten Island. She retired to the Bronx Zoo, which is a whole other story. (Thomas Hynes for Untapped New York)

20 Michelin-starred restaurants still open. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Thank you to reader Ariana for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for May 12, 2020 – The “Everyone Except Staten Island is Doing It” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Alt-side parking returns for a week, Frank Constanza’s house, jealous of the Finger Lakes, MoMA’s new online exhibit, a dessert delivery guide, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 56˚
Clear throughout the day.

While I was watching the mayor’s press conferences, it hit me just how ugly NYC’s flags are. (Jeff Coltin for City and State New York)

Quickly, what are the names of the two NYPL lions? Patience and Fortitude. I can’t beleive you forgot their names on their 109th birthday. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Mayor de Blasio is a unifier. With one tweet, tenants and renters both unified in their hatred of him. (Erik Engquist for The Real Deal)

RIP Jerry Stiller. Did you know you can go see Frank Constanza’s house in Queens? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

District attorneys in every borough but Staten Island have pledged not to prosecute those arrested for social distancing offenses, and in some cases, other violations stemming from recent emergency measures. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Alt-side parking is coming back for one week so the Sanitation Department can perform a “clean sweep” of the streets. Alt-side parking is back from May 18-25. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Jacques Torres’s Soho flagship store is closing for good. His other locations and Sunset Park manufacturing facility are staying open. (Serena Dai for Eater)

A Queens couple, Paulo Pinho and Clelia Pinho, allegedly attacked a group of Hasidic men on Sunday, supposedly over social distancing. I think they missed the point if they ripped the masks off the men’s’ faces while punching them. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If everything goes according to plan and the city doesn’t become Michigan or Florida, there’s a chance we can start to reopen in June. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city’s largest provider of shelter and support services for homeless mothers and their children announced a new housing stability and recovery plan, “The Aftermath Plan: Responding to Homelessness in the Wake of COVID-19.” 25% of working mothers in shelters have recently lost their jobs. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Portions of upstate are reopening on Friday. Feeling jealous of the Finger Lakes region? (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

Congrats everyone, we are subsidizing a 90% empty NYC Ferry system! In all of April, there were 19,851 riders on the ferry. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

No one was ready for snow and hail in mid-May. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A bill is working its way through the state’s legislature that will allow businesses to refuse entry to people who have a temperature of 100.4 or above. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

Are your neighbors noisy assholes? Here’s some advice on how to do your best to soundproof your apartment. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Now available from the MoMA is MoMA Through Time, which is an incomplete history of MoMA and MoMA PS1, as told through objects in the archives. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The CDC’s data points to an additional 5,923 deaths in New York City that are not in the confirmed or probable coronavirus death count, starting from March 11. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The best and worst grocery store Mexican food, according to Eater’s food critics. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

“Can’t wait to write a tell all about my experience during my last two trimesters dealing with the incompetent doctors at Montefiore.” –Amber Isaac tweeted about her care at Montefiore a few days before she died, pregnant in the hospital. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

Between the Windows is an art project you can see while walking Manhattan Avenue in Greenpoint, from Vanessa Albury. The first three-week residency features work from David B. Smith. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Moving companies are still at it during quarantine. Not as many people are moving, but it’s still necessary for people leaving the city or for the time-honored New York sport of “there’s gotta be a better place to live than this neighborhood.” (Hoa P Nguyen for Bedford + Bowery)

Remember gyms? Here’s what gyms of New York’s future may look like. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Vourderis family owns and operates Wonder Wheel park, and while bracing for a devastating summer in Coney Island, they are spending their time volunteering. The family has been making 3D printed face shields for first responders using printers that were purchased to make back-up parts for the amusement park rides. “You can’t knock New York City down. You can beat it up a little bit, but it’s always gonna come back.” -Deno Vourderis. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The state Supreme Court’s Appellate Division has rejected a lawsuit that sought to stop the erection of a pedestrian and bicycle bridge over Clara Coffey Park. The bridge will connect Sutton Place South to the East River Esplanade, spanning FDR Drive. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

The NYC dessert delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for May 11, 2020 – The “A Huge Amount of Restraint by the NYPD” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo did not extend NY PAUSE past May 15, the Rent Guidelines Board explained, the NYC dessert delivery guide, Spike Lee’s NYC love letter, & more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 60˚
Possible light rain in the morning.

NY is not extending PAUSE through June 6. Early reporting stated that incorrectly. What happened over the weekend is Governor Cuomo extending New York’s state of emergency. Regions of the state that meet the state’s criteria will be opening, but in the city we can all but guarantee that we’re going last. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Apartment Porn: An Upper East Side Townhouse with an indoor pool, a wild spiral staircase, and a dining room larger than most apartments. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Details on the deal that resulted in New York paying some schmuck $86 million for ventilators that never materialized. Maybe New York is the schmuck in this deal. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Thomas Kaplan for NY Times)

Black and brown New Yorkers received more than 80 percent of social distancing summons handed out by the NYPD. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“I was on the floor, I thought I was going to die.” A first-hand account from Adegoke Atunbi of being arrested by the NYPD’s 75th precinct, the most-sued precinct in NYC. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

There’s been a huge amount of restraint by the NYPD” -Mayor de Blasio, on the very obvious bias in policing of social distancing observed anecdotally but also in numbers released by the NYPD. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

After a week of violent arrests of minority New Yorkers and criticism of how differently the NYPD is handling overcrowding in parks, the mayor decided to limit the number of people allowed Hudson River and Domino Park. That fixes everything, right? (NY1)

Take a look at the latest filings for Pacific Park, the set of apartment buildings planned for the Atlantic Yards. (Norman Odler for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Edible Queens will close at the end of the month, after a three-year run. Each Edible publication is independently owned. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Allowing bars and restaurants to sell cocktails to go has been a lifeline to some bars, but to the bars in the city whose appeal is the community and not the cocktails, they continue to struggle. The damage of the ongoing closure is putting the city’s remaining lesbian bars in danger. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

While restaurants are fighting to survive, Grubhub is reporting record revenue. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Whenever the city’s restaurants are allowed to open back up, expect reduced capacity and new social distancing rules to be put in place. If you thought going back to restaurants and bars was going to be the “all clear” signal, we’ll still have a long road ahead. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The first death of a child due to the syndrome linked to Covid-19 was reported at the end of last week. On Friday, there were 73 children in the state hospitalized because of the syndrome. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

NYC’s reaction to JetBlue’s low-altitude flyover was a general “could you please not?” (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Gray’s Papaya on the Upper West Side has reopened. It’s not 24 hours (yet), but it’s nice to have an NYC institution back. (Carol Tannenhauser for West Side Rag)

Revel has continued its expansion during the pandemic, reaching into the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The Rent Guidelines Board (RGB) will vote on June 17 on adjustments for the city’s 1 million rent-stabilized apartments for the coming year. Your questions from “What is the RGB?” to “When does their decision go into effect” explained. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Tae Kyong Kim and Jung Soo Lee have been arrested and charged with price gouging for selling face masks for $45 a pack at Whitestone grocery store Raspberry Farm. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Welcome to 2020, where heroin is branded “Coronavirus.” Over a million dollars of Coronavirus heroin and fentanyl was seized in a University Heights bust. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Spike Lee’s short film New York New York is “A Love Letter To It’s People. Plain And Simple”. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Governor Andrew Cuomo extended the deadline for filing new childhood sexual abuse claims under New York’s Child Victims Act from August 14, 2020, to January 14, 2021. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

This weekend my wife found a place on Franklin Ave in Crown Heights that put itself online as an ice cream delivery store. It’s a corner store, but they found their angle to get themselves online. They’re not the only ones, in another example of finding your angle to get online, Annie’s Blue Ribbon General Store in Park Slope has 1,000 piece puzzles for those of you clamoring for new puzzles. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Ben Benson, whose career took him from helping create TGI Friday’s, to creating Smith and Woolensky, to eventually creating his own steakhouse, Ben Benson’s. (Kim Severson for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio put NYC Health + Hospitals in charge of the city’s Covid-19 testing and tracing programs instead of the Department of Mental Health and Mental Hygiene, a decision universally disliked by the City Council, City Comptroller Scott Stringer, and health officials. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

This week’s streaming performances from the Metropolitan Opera. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

Over the weekend, as temperatures dropped into the 30s, the MTA still closed the subways for disinfecting, and provided “bus shelters” for the homeless New Yorkers that were removed from the trains overnight. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Op-ed: Acting New York City Transit president Sarah Feinberg in her own words on the subway shutdown. (Sarah Feinberg for amNewYork Metro)

Video: In defense of liking New York. (Jeremiah Moss for Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Who the hell thought it was a good idea for the Lower East Side’s open streets to only be open from 8am to noon? Doesn’t anyone know it’s a pandemic? Time has no meaning anymore! We can sleep until whenever we want! (Bowery Boogie)

What do you miss about New York? How about everything. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

The dessert delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)