The Briefly for April 30, 2020 – The “I Will Report You To 311 For This!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Alternatives for grocery delivery, Governor Cuomo’s quizzical piece of art, 40 inexpensive takeout suggestions, IKEA Rego Park’s opening delayed, and more

Today – Low: 53˚ High: 57˚
Rain until morning, starting again in the evening.

Waiting for an antibody test is the new waiting for a table at brunch. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

One of Brooklyn’s best places to go for peace and quiet is now closed to the public. Floyd Bennett Field is being used to store MTA buses, cutting off access to the Gateway National Recreation Area, Floyd Bennett Gardens Association’s access to their gardens, and some of the city’s best spots for biking. (Gabriel Sandoval and Jose Martinez for The City)

Andrew Yang is suing New York state for canceling the Democratic presidential primary, trying to get it reinstated. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

“I am not happy at all, and this doesn’t have to do with what candidate you are supporting.” –AOC on the primary’s cancelation. (Juan Manuel Benitez for NY1)

Residential noise complaints to 311 have gone up by 22% during everyone’s quarantine. I’m sorry, I’m trying to perfect my tap dancing. I’ll try to keep it down. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

A look inside the Hunts Point Food Distribution Center and how it’s kept itself, and the city’s food supply chain, going during the pandemic. (Gary He for Eater)

VIDEO: “The Central Park,” a mashup of scenes from movies in or around Central Park. (Flaming Pablum)

Major League Baseball continues to think of how to play the remainder of the season, whenever that might start. The latest idea disbands the American and National Leagues in favor of three geographic-based leagues and highlights local rivalries, giving us a season’s worth of Subway Series games. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The cover of the April 15 New Yorker sums life up pretty well right now. An interview with Chris Ware about “Still Life.” (Françoise Mouly for The New Yorker)

Sara Erenthal’s work, which uses the city’s trash as a canvas for years, has been featured multiple times in The Briefly’s daily photos (including one claiming “our president is an absolute piece of shit, which I got an angry email about). Here’s an interview with Erenthal about her art and experience creating it. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A series of interviews with N.Y.U. Langone Health nurses, who bear the burden and weight of the city’s sick and dying. (David Gonzalez and Sinna Nasseri for NY Times)

“You know what it spells? It spells love.” When Governor Cuomo unveiled a wall of masks, I spent a few moments actually searching for the word “LOVE” within it. He was speaking metaphorically and I’m glad no one was around to watch me lean in and squint to try to see it. I wasn’t the only one confused. (Kathleen Culliton for

Go beyond Amazon Prime and Instacart. 10 grocery delivery services that are locally focused. (amNewYork Metro)

The funeral in Williamsburg is putting the NYPD and city officials in a tough spot. More than 2,000 Satmar Hasidic Jewish residents flooded the streets, despite an attempt to work with the NYPD to socially distance, endangering everyone involved. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea stated it bluntly: there will be “zero tolerance” for gatherings like this in the future because the crowds are “putting my cops at risk.” (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

“I have no regrets about calling out this danger and saying we’re going to be dealing with it very, very aggressively” -Mayor de Blasio on future enforcement of social distancing after the funeral. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

CitiBike is expanding into upper Manhattan and the Bronx starting the week of May 4 with 100 new docking stations. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A map of the Bronx’s new CitiBike locations. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The city will offer COVID-19 antibody tests to 150,000 health care workers and first responders to determine whether they’ve been infected. The Department of Defense will also be setting up a program to treat health care workers for “combat stress.” Chirlane McCray is in charge of the mental health program. Hopefully, unlike her past work with ThriveNYC, this will be proven to be effective. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Throughout May, the city will transfer 1,000 New Yorkers living in city homeless shelters every week to vacant hotel rooms, according to the mayor. The city has approximately 30,000 empty hotel rooms. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The YMCA launched YMCA @ Home, free workout classes. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is offering 200 exhibition catalogs from its archives for free, dating back to 1936. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Last weekend you baked Junior’s cheesecake, this weekend are you ready for another challenge? Here’s the recipe for Magnolia Bakery’s iconic cupcakes. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

A closer look at the MTA’s new code of conduct that is written with the explicit intention of clearing homeless New Yorkers from trains and enable daily disinfecting of each car. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

IKEA Rego Park’s store opening has been pushed back to the fall. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

Dozens of bodies — many of which were the remains of coronavirus victims – were seen being loaded from several U-Haul trucks to a refrigerator truck outside of a Brooklyn funeral home on Wednesday. (Todd Maisel and Jessica Parks for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Samuel Hargress Jr., owner of Paris Blues in Harlem and “the soul ambassador of, that culture of community.” (Steven Kurutz for NY Times)

Vox Media furloughed 9% of its staff and will be making Curbed a part of New York Magazine. Starting May 1, Curbed will be completely furloughed for three months. There is a GoFundMe for the Vox staff who have been furloughed. (Vox Media Furlough Fund)

Looking to donate food to the city’s essential workers? Here are eight ways to deliver food without having to leave your couch. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

40 inexpensive dining destinations still open, straight from Robert Sietsema’s inexpensive dining column. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Natalie for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 21, 2020 – The “Mayor de Blasio Wants You to Snitch” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: All public events in June are canceled, the best Indian takeout and delivery options, the NY Times discovers studio apartments in quarantine and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 62˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

A pilot program to bring on-site health services and expanded COVID-19 testing to residents of NYCHA will roll out this week, according to Governor Cuomo. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The country’s most expensive sushi restaurant now has a takeout option to match. Masa is selling an $800 box of sushi or sashimi every Friday. It will feed four people and you have to assemble it yourself. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio wants you to snitch on your fellow New Yorkers for not socially distancing. “I’m sorry this is not snitching.” -Mayor de Blasio. On a serious note, report people or plaes that are promoting something that is creating an unsafe condition. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The mayor may not have the authority to close the schools or make rulings over the subways, but he does have the ability to cancel public events and Mayor de Blasio has canceled all public events in June. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The New York City LGBTQ Pride March: Canceled. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Shakespeare in the Park: Canceled. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Half Marathon: Canceled. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival: Canceled. Is this going to be a year without festivals in NYC? (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Coney Island Mermaid Parade: Postponed. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The federal government’s $350 billion funding for small businesses ran out last week, calling attention to larger businesses that received checks, like Shake Shack’s $10 million. Shake Shack announced it would be giving that $10 million back after public outrage was pointed in their direction. (Zachary Warmbrodt for Politico)

Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, described as the third-best steakhouse in every second-tier city in America, has 150 locations, $86 million in cash reserves, and also received a forgivable $20 million loan from the federal government, making sure businesses who need those loans will never get them. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

How do you demolish a 52-story building in Manhattan? Very slowly. 270 Park Avenue’s 707-foot-tall building is being demolished to make way for a massive 1,425-foot-tall building. (Michael Young for New York YIMBY)

The NYC Human Rights Commission is launching a team to respond to COVID-19 discrimination and harassment, as reports of racism against Asians surge in the city. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The NYPD’s statistics are being criticized because a new hate crime category titled “Other Corona” hides the increase in biased-based attacked on the Asian community in New York. Multiple groups have stepped up to collect reports of harassment and racist incidents. (Ese Olumhense, Rachel Holliday Smith, Ann Choi and Christine Chung for The City)

It’s the size of a football and for $20, it can full of a mixed drink and yours with a straw. A refill is only $15. (EV Grieve)

The city opened five new COVID-19 “walk-in” test centers that will prioritize patients older than 65 with preexisting medical conditions who live in areas of the city that have been disproportionately affected by the spread of coronavirus. “Walk in” is in quotes because it’s not a drive-through test center. You still need an appointment to get a test. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Imagine the indignity of the choices that the 1% have to make in these very trying times. They have to choose between quarantining with their household staff or, get this, doing their own chores. (Dennis Lynch for The Real Deal)

Are you real for virtual dating? (Alyson Krueger for NY Times)

Where to get Indian delivery and takeout. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

If your neighbor tests positive for COVID-19, does your landlord have to tell you? There’s nothing that legally compels them to. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

I don’t think the New York that we left will be back for some years.”- Gregg Bishop, commissioner of the city’s small businesses agency. Thank you for your optimism Gregg. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

The Times looks at New Yorkers self-isolating in studio apartments, including a couple paying $2,300 for a 237 square foot studio apartment. (Penelope Green for NY Times)

Welcome to New York Sabrina Ionesco, the first overall pick in the WNBA draft, who will be playing for the Liberty. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Food critic Ryan Sutton’s 15 favorite takeout and delivery options (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Thanks to reader Xan for today’s featured photo of “Invisible Man: A Memorial to Ralph Ellison”.

The Briefly for March 26, 2020 – The “Plenty of Dogs and Cats to Adopt” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Elmhurst hospital is overwhelmed with COVID-19, Jumaane Williams calls for full lockdown, the MTA is losing $125 million a week, and more

Are you hiring? I’m working with the skint to help surface jobs in New York for New Yorkers. If you’re hiring or know someone who is, please pass this link along to them.


Today – Low: 47˚ High: 54˚
Clear throughout the day.

PDF Guide: Know Your Rights Guide for Transgender New Yorkers Navigating COVID-19 (Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund)

The only beds we’ve been able to free up are people who have died.” Elmhurst Hospital in Queens is the center of NYC’s COVID-19 crisis. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

Video: The Times spent 72 hours following an emergency room doctor at Elmhurst hospital. (Robin Stein and Caroline Kim for NY Times)

A heartbreaking plea from Rachel Sobolev, an emergency medicine resident in the city, begging the president to take this pandemic more seriously. (Rachel Sobolev for HuffPost)

No matter what you read, New York City is not running out of pets to adopt. The Bloomberg story was changed after publication, and probably after most people read it, to say that it was referring to foster animals. There are still plenty of animals that are looking for a forever home. (Hilary Hanson for HuffPost)

If you’ve ever wondered why it seems to take forever for the city to do anything, here’s a perfect example. The city has been in the process of installing a protected bike lane on Sixth Ave for seven years. Community Board 5 requested a study in 2013 and approved the design in 2015. What’s the holdup now? The Department of Transportation wants another approval from CB5. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Governor Cuomo said on Wednesday that we may have made incremental progress on slowing the wave of coronavirus cases. This is not a reason to celebrate or to stop creating physical distance between you and anyone else, but it’s a sign that some of our shared sacrifices might be working. (Ben Verde for Gay City News)

New York, you’ve got the rest of the week to prove to the mayor that you can use playgrounds responsibly or he will close them all. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

Photos: New Yorkers are not good at physical distancing. These are the people to blame. (Ben Yakas and Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Between Hicks and Henry Streets in Brooklyn Heights, you’ll find Love Lane, the city’s possible original “Lover’s Lane” dating back to the 1800s. (Atlas Obscura)

From the discovery of dendritic cells to the cure for tuberculosis, 10 medical discoveries made in NYC. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

A second Trader Joe’s was temporarily closed this week after a staffer tested positive for COVID-19. The closure of the Soho store will last at least three days while the store is sanitized. The Union Square store closed temporarily on Sunday and expects to reopen on Saturday. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Whole Foods is limiting the number of customers in its stores to 50, causing some mega lines outside the East Houston St store. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

A look at Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman in the United States to receive a medical degree who created the first hospital run by and for women on Bleecker St. (Harry Bubbins for GVSHP)

Remembering the Happy Land social club fire of 1990 and how it changed New York. (Allison Gilbert for NY Times)

The Trickle Up” is a streaming service from performer and playwright Taylor Mac that charges subscribers $10 per month to access original performances from 50 different artists, with proceeds going to artists struggling financially. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The FDA approved a new potential COVID-19 treatment that takes blood plasma from people who have recovered from the virus and transfuses it into people suffering from the disease. The New York Blood Center will be the first in the country to collect blood for the treatment. (Grant Lancaster for amNewYork Metro)

Subway ridership is down 87%, buses are don 70%, Metro-North is down 91% and the LIRR is down 71%. The MTA is estimating its weekly losses at $125 million a week and that the federal bailout’s $4 billion might not be enough for the MTA to survive. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A Piece of Work” is a podcast tour of collection highlights at the Museum of Modern Art hosted by comedian and actor Abbi Jacobson. Listen, when it comes to “understanding” modern art, I’ll take all the help I can get. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Going through this crisis is enough, but imagine going through a divorce right now on top of everything. (Hannah Ingber for NY Times)

Photos: What life is like for a delivery person. (Ryan Christopher Jones and Amber Jamieson for BuzzFeed News)

With defendants accused of crimes now facing judges by video because of the coronavirus pandemic, the city’s court system no longer has a way of supervising the vast majority of suspects being released back into their communities. One of the many messes that COVID-19 is making that we’re all going to have to figure out how to fix after it’s over. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

We’re still early in the crisis and there are thousands of hourly workers across the city running out of time and money for multiple sectors of the economy that were abruptly shuttered. (Sydney Pereira and Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

RIP Terrence McNally, a playwright whose accolades and body of work is beyond what I could summarize here. (Andy Humm for Gay City News)

The city is sending homeless shelter residents and public hospital patients with coronavirus to hotels and officials aren’t providing hotel staff or the city employees monitoring the infected guests with protective equipment — instead instructing them to maintain social distance. The homeless shelter residents is a change in policy, prior to this they were sending them back to shelters. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Jumaane Williams, the city’s public advocate, is advocating for a “full lockdown” that would close parks and construction sites and ban New Yorkers from leaving their neighborhoods except for essential work. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Where to get pizza delivery in NYC. It’s a little light on suggestions in the outer boroughs, but it’s fun to remember when we used to be able to go places to do things. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thank you to Lily from Hellgate Farm for today’s featured photo, which is allowing me to relax for a moment if I stare hard enough at it.