The Briefly for October 8, 2019 – The “What to Expect When You Eat at Wegman’s” Edition

No one knows where the money will come from for the MTA’s capital plan, the latest bar and restaurant openings, Brooklyn Bazaar is closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

61% of New Yorkers support the emergency ban on flavored vaping, despite a court ruling that halted its enforcement, according to a new poll from Sienna. (lohud)

Jumaane Williams is up for reelection this year, but neither of his opponents qualified to debate him, so if you want to know their stances on citywide issues you’re gonna have to track them down and ask them yourself. (Gotham Gazette)

The man charged with killing four men who are presumed to be homeless in Chinatown, 24-year-old Randy Santos, has confessed to the crimes according to prosecutors. (amNY)

What to expect when you’re eating at Wegman’s. (Eater)

How’s the MTA gonna pay for its $51.5 billion-dollar five-year capital plan? No, seriously, we don’t know yet. (amNY)

A federal judge tossed Trump’s federal lawsuit to block New York from subpoenaing the president’s taxes. (Patch)

Five takeaways from the ruling on Trump’s tax returns. (NY Times)

Say hello to the alcoholic Tide Pod. (Grub Street)

The MTA is ready to start testing new ultra-wideband signaling along the L line, but it’ll run parallel to the current equipment just in case something goes wrong. (Bushwick Daily)

Photos: Atop the infinity pool at the TWA Hotel. (Untapped Cities)

Is the city’s last Dean & Deluca already gone? (Grub Street)

The history of the Guggenheim Museum’s iconic New York City building. (Curbed)

10 of the oldest bars and restaurants in Brooklyn. (Untapped Cities)

The Charging Bull can’t catch a break. As part of the Extinction Rebellion Protest on Monday, the bull was doused in fake (I hope it was fake) blood. This was after last months’ banjo attack that left a gouge in its right horn. (Gothamist)

The steward of Fort Greene Park lays out the reasons for having to replace the trees in the park. Trees, like people, can be assholes. (Brooklyn Paper)

32 bus stops in the city are less than 260 feet apart. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn Bazaar will close at the end of November after the landlord was unwilling to negotiate a new lease. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A look at some of the newest bars and restaurants in the city. (amNY)

The Briefly for September 25, 2019 – The “Worst Possible Possible Candidate for Mayor” Edition

The Strand sues the city, treating carbon emissions like money, the LinkNYC Teletubbies, the East Side Protection plan approved, vegan restaurants, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Strand will sue the city in federal court to try to remove the landmark status of its building with the idea that the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s decision is an unconstitutional taking of private property. (Gothamist)

Tomokazu Matsuyama’s mural on the Bowery Wall is one of the most complex murals I can recall for the wall and took two weeks for the artist and 10 assistants working 12 hour days to complete. (Downtown Express)

Donald Trump Jr has decided not to run for mayor of NYC, despite past comments and wanting to. (Jezebel)

Whoever dressed up a bunch of LinkNYC kiosks like Teletubbies, you are a hero. (Gothamist)

The real estate and development industries don’t have a unifying board or mouthpiece that speaks for them, so when it comes to huge issues like climate change and carbon emissions everyone’s voice is singular. Where does the industry that creates 75% of NYC’s 52 metric tons of emissions stand? (The Real Deal)

62-year-old MD Abul Bashar died from injuries sustained on September 18 from being hit by a Lomangino Brothers dump truck, making him the 23rd cyclist to be killed in 2019 by a vehicle on NYC streets. 2018’s number was 10. (Streetsblog)

The East Side flood protection plan was approved by the City Planning Commission, despite outcry from the public that the city’s timeline seems unrealistic. (Curbed)

The Midtown Dean & DeLuca is now closed, leaving only the flagship in Soho open. (NY Times)

3 million public parking spaces, or 12 Central Parks, worth of space being used as storage for private property. Maybe it could be put to better use? (Gothamist)

There are still many unanswered questions about the man who jumped in front of a 4 train holding his daughter on Monday morning. The latest reports say that the five-year-old daughter is physically unharmed while Fernando Balbuena-Flores was pronounced dead by the FDNY. (Gothamist)

The NYPD will enact multiple suggestions in an attempt to end suicides on the force, which includes 9 active and 2 retired members in 2019. The Department of Investigations suggested adding a wellness outreach unit with a psychologist, social worker, and police officer for every 1,000 officers, a training program to adjust to civilian life, and more. (amNY)

Swedish coffee chain Fika abruptly closed all seven of its NYC stores following a recent bankruptcy filing. (Eater)

Think you’ve got what it takes to become “Miss Subways?” Applications are being accepted through the 29th with the pageant taking place on October 3. (amNY

The city’s law that bans pre-employment drug tests for marijuana goes into effect in May 2020 and in the process will change HR policies nationwide. (amNY)

The City Council is poised to change control over Hart Island from the Department of Corrections to the Department of Parks and Recreation with a new package of bills. (Politico)

Chipotle employees in 20 locations all over the city went on strike on Tuesday over complaints of labor violations. Would you like illegal scheduling and denying extra pay with your burrito bowl? (Splinter)

The City Council will look at a bill that would treat our carbon emissions like our finances, taking inspiration from a model created by Oslo, Norway. (HuffPost)

In New York, it is a misdemeanor to claim to be able to use “occult powers, to answer questions or give advice on personal matters or to exorcise, influence or affect evil spirits or curses,” but it’s legal to do so “for entertainment purposes only.” Three spiritual advisors on the Upper West Side crossed over that line and owe their victims $60,000. (NY Times)

Amid a sexual harassment inquiry, Plácido Domingo left the Met Opera. (NY Times)

Williamsburg’s N 6th St is now the “hottest street” in Brooklyn when it comes to retail. (Bedford + Bowery)

19 rock-solid vegan restaurants in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 22, 2019 – The “Advertisements on Advertisements” Edition

A bloody night in Queens and Brooklyn, the mayor wants to save Di Fara, the governor invites him to pay their taxes, the best ice cream sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos: Take a look inside the Watchtower’s old headquarters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Elyse Marks is not your average restoration architect and an Instagram account full of photos repelling off of some of the city’s more well-known buildings proves it. (Untapped Cities)

What to see in the city’s art galleries right now. (NY Times)

The landmarked Long Island City Pepsi-Cola sign is now brought to you by JetBlue. (amNY)

Tuesday night was a bloody one in Queens and Brooklyn, with four unrelated shootings resulting in five homicides. Gun violence is up over 25% from last year. (Gothamist)

A report by Coalition for the Homeless shows the city’s housing plan is actually making the city’s homelessness problem worse. (Curbed)

“New Yorkers are very, very spoiled,” Mr. Toma said, seated in the driver’s seat of a black Rolls-Royce Wraith, as he waited for the club to fill. (NY Times)

Harvey Weinstein wants his rape trial moved out of New York City because of the city’s “inflammatory press coverage.” (Gothamist)

The quarter-billion-dollar overhaul of the Grand Central Shuttle has begun. (amNY)

An 11-year-old border-terrier mix and very good boy named Theo was stolen from outside a grocery store in Williamsburg on Monday night. Theo is suffering from arthritis, liver issues, tumors, and more, but one thing he won’t have to worry about is being away from home because he was reunited with his human on Wednesday. (Brooklyn Paper)

The atmosphere is “salon-like” in this “hidden gem” where women swap makeup tips and the lighting is good and there is open space. Where is this? Apparently, it’s the second-floor women’s bathroom at the Port Authority Bus Terminal. (NY Times)

The last of the pay-by-the-hour hotel to the history of the New Victory Theater, 10 seedy remnants of old Times Square you can still see today. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the ways landlords are trying to get around the new rent reform laws in order to screw you. (The Real Deal)

Legendary pizzeria Di Fara was seized by the state for owing $167k in taxes dating back to 2014. The mayor responded by saying he’s “ready to do anything I can to get them reopened.” (Grub Street)

“Now, if he wants to pay the $200,000 on behalf of the pizza place, he can do that.” -Governor Cuomo (amNY)

Mystery solved. The staff of Dean & Deluca’s says the store is so empty because they are going through a renovation, but will stay open as a coffee shop during the renovation. (Gothamist)

Lyft is partnering with GrowNYC and BMS Family Health and Wellness Centers to offer discounted rides to low-income New Yorkers in Brownsville to improve access to healthy food options at the green and farmer’s markets and Project EATS. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Andrew Herman is illustrating every Mets home game this season. (New York Cliche)

The driver whose recklessness lead to the death of cyclist Jose Alzorriz on Coney Island Avenue is facing charges of manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, vehicular assault, and reckless endangerment. Mirza Baig, 18, is one of the few drivers facing prison after killing a cyclist or pedestrian. (Streetsblog)

The city has lowered the requirements necessary to enter its affordable housing lotteries, lessening barriers that discourage undocumented immigrants from applying. (LIC Post)

There’s a GoFundMe for just about anything, including one for fired NYPD officer Daniel “Chokehold” Pantaleo. (Patch)

10 things you absolutely have to do in NYC before summer ends. (Time Out)

If you’ve ever been anywhere near Battery Park, you know the routine of ignoring the aggressive ticket sellers for trips around the Statue of Liberty. The ticket sellers are confusing at best and deceptive at worst. The city has terminated any docking permits to companies who accept tickets sold by street vendors. (Curbed)

The Fraunces Tavern, the oldest building in Manhattan, will celebrate its 300th anniversary with a party on October 1. (amNY)

The NYPD sergeant at the scene where Eric Garner was killed will not face a trial for her role in his death. Instead, Sgt. Kizzy Adonis will lose 20 vacation days. Eric Garner’s mother said the NYPD is “actively participating in an ongoing cover-up” and the police union that represents Adonis said she was “scapegoated.” (Patch)

If you go to Union Hall in Park Slope in September or October, there’s a 1/6 chance that David Cross will be performing. He’s announced 10 dates in the two months where he’ll be testing out new material on stage. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Video: Mike Chen of Strictly Dumpling takes you on a tour of his four favorite Brooklyn pizzerias. Di Fara was not on the list. (Viewing NYC)

Meet the subway’s “happiest conductor.” (Gothamist)

The mayor was a laughing stock in Iowa, but for once it wasn’t his polling numbers or debate performances. (Patch)

If you must get caught in a storm (that was me walking home from the subway last night before hosting John Trivialta at Parklife), Domino Park in Williamsburg is, at the very least, picturesque before the rain comes down. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Democrat councilman Andy King was charged by the Standards and Ethics Committee with harassment, disorderly conduct, conflict of interest violations and retaliation, from Minority Leader and Republican Steven Matteo. Specific details of the allegations were not disclosed. (amNY)

The best ice-cream sandwiches in the city, ranked. (Grub Street)