The Briefly for June 13, 2019 – The “A New Subway Villain Has Emerged” Edition

The governor will sign the rent reform laws, the mayor looks to further restrict Uber and Lyft’s operations, the best veggie burger in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the city’s top ten public high schools. (Patch)

The city’s new mansion tax is hitting on July 1, and sellers are already trying to price their way out of it. (StreetEasy)

New York City has a new subway villain. On different incidents, a man threw a bag of concrete, a fire extinguisher, Christmas lights, and a shovel. (Gothamist)

10 buildings connected to NYC’s maritime past. (Untapped Cities)

The best restaurants of 2019, according to Eater’s Ryan Sutton. (Eater)

“There’s a daunting task ahead of us on this,” is an understatement by the chair of the committee overseeing the $4 billion reconstruction of the BQE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed the mannequin children strewn across the city in small cages? No Kids in Cages is responsible for the 25 protest installations across Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Outside of San Francisco, Brooklyn has the country’s most booming tech sector, growing 356% in the last ten years. (amNY)

Where to eat near the Boardwalk in Rockaway Beach. (Eater)

While the Governors Island “urban camping experience” isn’t exactly camping by most stretches of the imagination with miniature cabins, 1500 thread count sheets, wifi, electricity, a spa, and room service, but it does look nice (6sqft)

In the last year, the city ensured a minimum wage for Uber and Lyft drivers and prevented any new drivers from being added to the pool of e-hail vehicles which already makes up 29% of all cars below 60th in Manhattan. The mayor’s next restriction will be limiting the amount of time e-hail vehicles can cruise below 96th in Manhattan without a passenger. Currently, e-hail vehicles spend 41% of their time without passengers. That rate would have to drop to 31% under the coming rule, or companies would face fines or potentially have their licenses to operate revoked. (amNY)

Here is the horseshoe route for the World Pride Parade on June 30, which is expected to be the largest Pride Parade in history. (6sqft)

The DOT unveiled plans for a protected bike lane on Central Park West. The Community Board and City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal had called for a two-way bike lane, similar to Prospect Park West, but the DOT called that idea “psychologically unrealistic.” (Gothamist)

A guide to (responsibly) day drink. (The Infatuation)

I’m bullish on anything that brings more joy and delight to the city in a near-invisible fashion. See Me Tell Me is playing hide-and-seek with her art on Instagram. Right now the has under a thousand followers, but let’s see if we can’t change that. (Bedford + Bowery)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds” may be the creed of the postal service, but in the city, it’s the food delivery person that follows that creed to the letter and City Comptroller Scott Stringer is adding his voice to those calling for the legalization of electric bikes with an op-ed for Streetsblog. (Streetsblog)

Take a ride on the 3rd Ave El in a film from 1955, documenting Manhattan’s last elevated subway line. (Viewing NYC)

The governor supports the rent reform bills that are working their way through the legislature and has voiced that once they’re on his desk he will sign them into law, which hasn’t always been a guarantee. (amNY)

When the rent reform bills become law, it will be the signal that the influence that New York’s real estate industry holds over the state’s politics is not untouchable. (NY Times)

Yoko Ono’s ‘The Reflection Project’ is moving into unconventional spaces in lower Manhattan, encouraging you to “rally the collective consciousness towards heightened awareness, hope and action.” Just don’t do it in someone else’s way. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Gem Spa on St Mark’s and Second Ave is in danger of closing. A combination of rising rents and a former employee selling cigarettes to a minor have threatened the iconic store’s 80-year existence. It’s likely the best place you can buy egg creams and fedoras and coffee and candy in the city. (Vanishing New York)

Another detainee died in the custody of the Department of Corrections two days after the death of Layleen Polanco on Rikers Island. The cause of death and name haven’t been released. (Patch)

This new IKEA robotic furniture looks right out of The Fifth Element. (6sqft)

The governor is pushing for the state to extend the statute of limitations for rape victims and change the legal definition of harassment. (Politico)

The new status symbol for performers is a Broadway residency and the latest name to make their way is Dave Chappelle. Dave Chappelle Live on Broadway will happen from July 9-13 with tickets going on same June 18th. (Gothamist)

A guide to Pride in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The House Judiciary Committee passed the bill to reauthorize and fund the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund for about seven more decades after being publicly shamed by Jon Stewart. (Patch)

How did Jon Stewart become the voice of the ongoing victims of 9/11? (NY Times)

“It’s another entertainment show beginning with an overwrought speech of a shaken host.” The first Daily Show with Jon Stewart after the 9/11 attacks is still worth watching. (Comedy Central)

A first look at the new DUMBO library. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Drone photos and videos from high above Green-Wood Cemetery. (Gothamist)

The city’s best veggie burgers. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for New Year’s Eve, 2018 – The “One Million Soaking Wet People in Diapers Looking Up” Edition

Happy New Year from The Briefly! Corey Johnson will become acting NYC public advocate, no umbrellas in Times Square, the best New Year’s brunch, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

You can’t leave to go to the bathroom and other things you need to know about Times Square tonight. (You’ll need diapers.) (amNY)

The NYPD will have 1,225 cameras in Times Square, including the first time use of drones at a large-scale event. (NY Post)

Today’s forecast calls for rain starting in the afternoon and going past the ball drop at midnight, which adds a hurdle for the masses in Times Square who are not allowed to bring umbrellas into the heavily policed area. (NYC.gov)

Hush hush, Mayor de Blasio wants to reduce city noise. (NY Post)

It started as investigating a gas leak and ended with the discovery of two grow houses in the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Everyone wants a piece of legal weed, including unions. The Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union has hopes to unionize the thousands of workers who will handle or sell cannabis once it’s legal. (NY Post)

Add another entry to the “do not do this on the subway” list. This one’s for everyone, not just the perverts, weirdos, or man-spreaders. (Gothamist)

Everything you need to know about getting around tonight. (Curbed)

The Fair Fares program, which will provide reduced transit fares for low-income New Yorkers, is scheduled to launch in January, but the are no details about the program released by the mayor’s office. (NY Post)

The 12 hottest brunch spots in the city. (Eater)

Take a front row seat to last week’s Astoria Borealis with these videos. (Gothamist)

The East Side Access project connecting the LIRR and MetroNorth has hit a crippling obstacle: bureaucracy. (NY Post)

Could Letitia James’ focus on President Trump backfire with judges that may see a political vendetta instead of a pursuit of justice? (NY Times)

The special election for Public Advocate will be held on February 26, 2019. (NY Post)

Until a new public advocate is elected, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will pull double duty, taking on on the role of acting public advocate. (NY Times)

A retired Internal Affairs detective, Staten Island’s William Nolan, was arrested for allegedly sending threatening emails to former colleagues in the NYPD. A cache of weapons was also seized. He was described as a “ticking time bomb” and is out on bail. (NY Post)

“This isn’t Rikers. … We do what we want here.” A lawsuit alleges that Rikers inmates are sent upstate to skirt NYC laws where they are beaten, put in solitary confinement, and forced to undergo rectal searches. (Yahoo)

City employees have over $650,000 of unpaid parking tickets and violations. Of all of the employees to have received tickets or summonses, one person has had their driving privileges revoked. (NY Post)

The Gowanus Canal seems like an odd inspiration for Calvin Klein, but you can buy a Foundation Trucker Jacket in the color”Gowanus Black.” (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD busted the Fausto Stillo barber shop in Sunset Park for running an illegal cockfighting operation. (NY Post)

16 hangover-busting dishes for New Years Day brunch. (Eater)

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The Briefly for December 26, 2018 – The “A Bronx Zoo Inside A One Bedroom Apartment” Edition

The 8 hour city bus joyride, subway closures for the rest of the year, New York’s diminishing population , no more 7 train on nights and weekends, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The gender pay gap among city workers is three times larger than in the private sector. The City Council’s Introduction 633 will mandate an annual report that will highlight gender, ethnic, or racial pay gaps. (Metro)

There will be no overnight or weekend 7 train service between Manhattan and Queens in January of February. Happy New Year! (Sunnyside Post)

The E, M, and J trains will hobble into 2019 with extensive delays through the end of the year. (6sqft)

Two 80 pound snapping turtles, an eel, a dove, multiple smaller turtles, fish, a pit bull puppy, and a possum were seized by Animal Care and Control from one bedroom apartment in the Bronx that Richie Rodriquez shared with his wife and 6-year-old daughter. (Gothamist)

Over 2,500 adults in New York state are in solitary confinement between 23 and 24 hours a day. The HALT Solitary Confinement Act passed the State Assembly in June but not the State Senate. Activists are lobbying the Governor to alter solitary confinement to 15 hour days using his powers over the state’s Department of Corrections. (Gothamist)

New York lost 48,510 people between July 2017 and July 2018, which could mean that New York would lost two congressional seats after the 2020 election. (NY Post)

Can Vinateria’s chef Mimi Weissenborn make Eggs Benedict in a tiny Upper East Side kitchen with zero counter space? (Refinery 29)

CBGB’s makes a return to NYC… in miniature as part of the Transit Museum’s 17th Annual Holiday Train Show. (EV Grieve)

The five homeless men who wound up in a fight with an NYPD officer on Monday night have been released without charges. (NY Post)

Meet the Romp family, who have sold Christmas trees in the West Village since 1988. (Gothamist)

The city, the city’s worst landlord, is unsurprisingly behind schedule on fixing peeling and possibly lead-tinted paint in NYCHA apartments. In order to meet its commitment to a federal judge, the city has to fix 2,800 apartments by the end of February. Only 190 apartment have been tended to since December 11. (NY Post)

By the time the MTA realized someone stole a city bus from the Bronx, it was eight hours later and the thief had already returned it. (NY Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer has a plan to help middle-income New Yorkers who buy homes. The plan will create 85,000 new apartments by taxing all-cash and mortgaged home purchases evenly, which will lower taxes for middle-income purchasers and impose a new tax on all-cash buyers and raise $400 million in the process. (Town & Village)

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