The Briefly for New Year’s Eve, 2018 – The “One Million Soaking Wet People in Diapers Looking Up” Edition

Happy New Year from The Briefly! Corey Johnson will become acting NYC public advocate, no umbrellas in Times Square, the best New Year’s brunch, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

You can’t leave to go to the bathroom and other things you need to know about Times Square tonight. (You’ll need diapers.) (amNY)

The NYPD will have 1,225 cameras in Times Square, including the first time use of drones at a large-scale event. (NY Post)

Today’s forecast calls for rain starting in the afternoon and going past the ball drop at midnight, which adds a hurdle for the masses in Times Square who are not allowed to bring umbrellas into the heavily policed area. (NYC.gov)

Hush hush, Mayor de Blasio wants to reduce city noise. (NY Post)

It started as investigating a gas leak and ended with the discovery of two grow houses in the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Everyone wants a piece of legal weed, including unions. The Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union has hopes to unionize the thousands of workers who will handle or sell cannabis once it’s legal. (NY Post)

Add another entry to the “do not do this on the subway” list. This one’s for everyone, not just the perverts, weirdos, or man-spreaders. (Gothamist)

Everything you need to know about getting around tonight. (Curbed)

The Fair Fares program, which will provide reduced transit fares for low-income New Yorkers, is scheduled to launch in January, but the are no details about the program released by the mayor’s office. (NY Post)

The 12 hottest brunch spots in the city. (Eater)

Take a front row seat to last week’s Astoria Borealis with these videos. (Gothamist)

The East Side Access project connecting the LIRR and MetroNorth has hit a crippling obstacle: bureaucracy. (NY Post)

Could Letitia James’ focus on President Trump backfire with judges that may see a political vendetta instead of a pursuit of justice? (NY Times)

The special election for Public Advocate will be held on February 26, 2019. (NY Post)

Until a new public advocate is elected, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will pull double duty, taking on on the role of acting public advocate. (NY Times)

A retired Internal Affairs detective, Staten Island’s William Nolan, was arrested for allegedly sending threatening emails to former colleagues in the NYPD. A cache of weapons was also seized. He was described as a “ticking time bomb” and is out on bail. (NY Post)

“This isn’t Rikers. … We do what we want here.” A lawsuit alleges that Rikers inmates are sent upstate to skirt NYC laws where they are beaten, put in solitary confinement, and forced to undergo rectal searches. (Yahoo)

City employees have over $650,000 of unpaid parking tickets and violations. Of all of the employees to have received tickets or summonses, one person has had their driving privileges revoked. (NY Post)

The Gowanus Canal seems like an odd inspiration for Calvin Klein, but you can buy a Foundation Trucker Jacket in the color”Gowanus Black.” (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD busted the Fausto Stillo barber shop in Sunset Park for running an illegal cockfighting operation. (NY Post)

16 hangover-busting dishes for New Years Day brunch. (Eater)

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The Briefly for December 26, 2018 – The “A Bronx Zoo Inside A One Bedroom Apartment” Edition

The 8 hour city bus joyride, subway closures for the rest of the year, New York’s diminishing population , no more 7 train on nights and weekends, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The gender pay gap among city workers is three times larger than in the private sector. The City Council’s Introduction 633 will mandate an annual report that will highlight gender, ethnic, or racial pay gaps. (Metro)

There will be no overnight or weekend 7 train service between Manhattan and Queens in January of February. Happy New Year! (Sunnyside Post)

The E, M, and J trains will hobble into 2019 with extensive delays through the end of the year. (6sqft)

Two 80 pound snapping turtles, an eel, a dove, multiple smaller turtles, fish, a pit bull puppy, and a possum were seized by Animal Care and Control from one bedroom apartment in the Bronx that Richie Rodriquez shared with his wife and 6-year-old daughter. (Gothamist)

Over 2,500 adults in New York state are in solitary confinement between 23 and 24 hours a day. The HALT Solitary Confinement Act passed the State Assembly in June but not the State Senate. Activists are lobbying the Governor to alter solitary confinement to 15 hour days using his powers over the state’s Department of Corrections. (Gothamist)

New York lost 48,510 people between July 2017 and July 2018, which could mean that New York would lost two congressional seats after the 2020 election. (NY Post)

Can Vinateria’s chef Mimi Weissenborn make Eggs Benedict in a tiny Upper East Side kitchen with zero counter space? (Refinery 29)

CBGB’s makes a return to NYC… in miniature as part of the Transit Museum’s 17th Annual Holiday Train Show. (EV Grieve)

The five homeless men who wound up in a fight with an NYPD officer on Monday night have been released without charges. (NY Post)

Meet the Romp family, who have sold Christmas trees in the West Village since 1988. (Gothamist)

The city, the city’s worst landlord, is unsurprisingly behind schedule on fixing peeling and possibly lead-tinted paint in NYCHA apartments. In order to meet its commitment to a federal judge, the city has to fix 2,800 apartments by the end of February. Only 190 apartment have been tended to since December 11. (NY Post)

By the time the MTA realized someone stole a city bus from the Bronx, it was eight hours later and the thief had already returned it. (NY Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer has a plan to help middle-income New Yorkers who buy homes. The plan will create 85,000 new apartments by taxing all-cash and mortgaged home purchases evenly, which will lower taxes for middle-income purchasers and impose a new tax on all-cash buyers and raise $400 million in the process. (Town & Village)

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The Briefly for November 12, 2018 – The “Your Shawarma Cart Has A C Rating” Edition

Out compost is trash, Williamsburg is booming, student walk out over a Facebook education, the Rockefeller Tree is here, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

What week is complete without being unable to get around at night? No overnight L or 3 trains, changes to the Q, E, 1, 2, and D lines. (Subway Changes)

Get ready for your favorite street meat cart to have a health department grade. (NY Post)

Live-shooter trainings inside synagogues. Armed guards inside churches. This is what NYC’s religious services look like in 2018. (NY Post)

The 72-foot-tall Rockefeller Center Christmas tree has taken her place at 30 Rock. You can visit Shelby before she gets lit up on November 28th at 7pm. (NY Post)

The RFK Human Rights Foundation’s mass bail out is shining light on the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice and Department of Corrections. Should a man who was caught on video assaulting a guard have been allowed bail one week after the incident? (NY Post)

Does New York’s blue wave mean that the golden era of charter schools is over? (NY Times)

High school students organized a walkout in protest of a Facebook-backed curriculum. After a week of self-teaching, each student gets somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes of “mentoring.” (NY Post)

How is it possible that Ice-T has never eaten a bagel in his life? (Gothamist)

Having completely fixed the subways and buses, the MTA Chairman Joe Lhota has resigned. (Streetsblog)

The city’s best ice skating rinks. (Curbed)

People struggling to cross the street during the NYC Marathon is exactly what you need on Monday morning. (Gothamist)

Michael J. Ryan, the man in charge of last week’s election, on what went right and what went wrong. (Gothamist)

If Seoul and San Francisco can get it right, why can’t the city’s composting program get off the ground? (NY Times)

Even the L train can’t stop Williamsburg’s development boom. Take a look at the map. (Curbed)

Dr Kurt Salzinger, an 89-year-old scholar who escaped the Nazis in Austria, died after being shoved onto the 3 train’s subway tracks in Penn Station. (NY Times)

The city’s 40 best brunches. (Eater)

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