The Briefly for December 4, 2018 – The “Legalize Weed to Save the Subways” Edition

City Hall is in chaos over Mayor de Blasio’s botched firing, parents are calling the DOE’s desegregation plans racist, the 7 train’s new signals aren’t helping, and other uplifting stories in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Bill de Blasio, absentee mayor. (NY Times)

Are you ready for NYPD tactical drones? (NY Post)

The 10 worst dishes of the year, including one sandwich from Arby’s, from Eater’s senior critic Robert Sietsema.

Could legal weed save our subways? (NY Times)

12 new public art installations to pair with a hot drink of your choosing. (Untapped Cities)

Santacon is this Saturday, starting at 10am. In a defensive move, the LIRR, Metro North, and NJ Transit have all banned alcohol consumption. If you need to be on a train that day, may the odds be ever in your favor. (Gothamist)

With Santacon descending onto the unwilling city this Saturday, here are a list of the bars to avoid. (Time Out)

Board of Elections Executive Director Michael Ryan enjoyed nine undisclosed trips paid for by Election Systems and Software, makers of the ballot scanning machines that plagued the city on Election Day. He never received the necessary waiver from the city’s Conflicts of Interest Board to sit on the conpany’s board of advisors. (Gothamist)

George R.R. Martin: pizza critic? (Gothamist)

The 10 biggest real estate projects coming to NYC. (The Real Deal)

The Staten Island NYPD officers Kyle Erickson and Elmer Pastran, accused of planting pot in a black teenager’s car, have, surprise surprise, a history of accusations of racial profiling. (Gothamist)

The Apollo Theater is expanding for the first time since 1934. The foundation that oversees the Apollo will take over the Victoria and open 99 and 199 seat performance spaces and should open in 2020. (NY Times)

“The richest man in America, who’s a direct competitor, has just been handed $3 billion in subsidies. I’m not asking for money or a tax rebate. Just leave me alone.” -Strand owner Nancy Bass Wyden (6sqft)

Thanks to a new legislation, Uber and Lyft drivers will be paid at least minimum wage. (NY Post)

Upset about the Amazon Long Island City deal? You could install the “Black Amazon for Me” Chrome extension, but we all know you won’t. (amNY)

The 7 trains brand new signals, installed late and over budget, weren’t installed optimally. At this point, is anyone surprised that the MTA spent too much money and took too much time to poorly install signals that haven’t helped? (amNY)

Squibb Bridge was installed in 2013 to connect the Brooklyn Promenade to Brooklyn Nridge Park, but the last five years have been full of closures, structural problems, and a lawsuit. The bridge is going to be replaced by 2020. (Curbed)

As we’re hitting the home stretch of 2018, we could be looking at a new record low number of homicides. Despite the downward trend, rape complaints continue to increase, following a two year trend. (amNY)

Parents are calling the DOE’s desegregation plan racist, which shows just how complicated this situation is. (NY Post)

What the hell is going on in City Hall and why can’t the mayor get his administration under control? (NY Post)

Everything to know about the restaurants in the Hudson Yards. (Thrillist)

The first map of Central Park for people with disabilities or otherwise “limited mobility” is now available. (West Side Rag)

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The Briefly for November 21, 2018 – The “Frozen Turkey, Travelers, and Parade Watchers” Edition

$150 cocktails on a rooftop bar inside a converted water tower in Williamsburg, everything you need to know for travel or staying local on Thanksgiving, the “MTA Museum” and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A five gallon bucket of a mysterious green liquid spilled on Atlantic Avenue had to be removed by firefighters. No word on turtles study ninjutsu. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Learn more than you care to about your neighbors, including in-depth health history, income, vaccinations and more. (data2gohealth)

Looking back on the 1980 Ramrod Massacre. Once referred to by The New York Times as “barely remembered,” is eerily prescient 38 years later. (GVSHP)

The Barthman sidewalk clock, which recently went missing, is back on the Northeast corner of Maiden and Broadway. (Untapped Cities)

Restaurant jobs in New York increased, despite an increase in the tipped minimum wage. This could open the door to Governor Cuomo eliminating the tipped minimum wage. (Eater)

RIP Maxine, the Bronx Zoo’s 48-year-old elephant. (amNY)

Amazon’s HQ2 construction will likely start in 2020, as the city and state vow to allow public input. What’s the likelihood they’ll enjoy what they hear? (LIC Post)

Anyone up for $150 cocktails on a Williamsburg roof inside a converted water tower? Yup, peak Brooklyn has arrived. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Despite contacting Democrats in Iowa, Amazon Cuomo claims he isn’t running for president in 2020. (NY Post)

The “MTA Museum” pays tribute to all the “art” that surrounds us, like “Untitled, Butt Pattern” and “Chewing Gum on Concrete.” (Gothamist)

Where to eat at JFK Airport. (Eater)

Can the MTA finish repairs on the J/M/Z lines before the L train shuts down? Expect closures and inconveniences through the end of January. (Curbed)

12 restaurants with stunning views. (Eater)

The Flatiron Public Plaza Holiday Design Competition has chosen this year’s installation titled Happy. The transparent yellow vinyl on an open-frame structure is… interesting. (Time Out)

The man who allegedly defaced the African Burial Ground Monument, Ivan Nieves, was arrested on Tuesday. (NY Times)

Yeshivas and private schools schools could lose state funding if they fail to provide a substantially equivalent education to public schools. A three-year DOE probe showed that at some yeshivas, students were taught basic math and no science, and that was if officials were allowed in at all. Fifteen Brooklyn schools refused to allow their classes to be reviewed.(NY Post)


Traveling on Thanksgiving sucks, but it’s gonna be extra bad this year with freezing temperatures and snow coming in north of the city. (NY Post)

Interested in seeing the balloons being inflated Wednesday night? Here’s all the info you’ll need to satisfy your inner child, and maybe actual children too. (Gothamist)

Here’s where you can still volunteer on Thanksgiving day. (Bklyner)

If you see romaine lettuce in anyone’s hands at your family Thanksgiving, smack that E. coli infested leafy green nightmare out of their hands. Good job, hero. (Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about getting around on Thanksgiving. (Curbed)

The Heights and Hills Community Council in Brooklyn Heights is looking for pies to be donated to be served at their Thanksgiving Feast for Seniors. (Brooklyn Heights Blog)


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The Briefly for September 24, 2018 – The NYPD Fills Secret Quotas With Bogus Tickets Say Whistleblowers

The NYPD’s secret ticket quotas, a weekend of hell from the MTA, the city gets a new school bus czar, no helmets in Yankee stadium and more

NYPD whistleblowers claim that they are pressured to write bogus tickets to meet secret quotas, which confirms pretty much every single person who has ever gotten a ticket’s suspicions.

Public schools CEO Eric Goldstein was fired by the DOE after over 100,000 complaints were filed about bus transportation in the first month of school. He’ll be replaced by Kevin Moran, a former executive director of the DOE’s field support services in Staten Island.

Eddie’s Sweet Shop on Metropolitan Avenue in Forest Hills is the city’s oldest ice cream shop, dating back to 1909.

A tribute to the city car, a “banged up, asthmatic vehicle that is, at times, held together by duct tape,” by The New York Times.

ICE deported Gloria Hernandez Suarez of Queens after living in the Uniter States for 33 years last week without notice. She had been held in a detention facility in New Jersey since July.

Grand Central Terminal is celebrating the twenty years anniversary of its 1998 renovation with 1998 pricing on October 1.

How 1918’s prohibition restructured real estate and architecture in NYC.

A fight on a 2 subway car ended with everyone on board getting hit with pepper spray.

The ceiling collapsed on the 4/5 platform on Friday morning at the Atlantic Avenue-Barclays Center subway stop. This is the second time this year that a ceiling collapsed.

It was a banner weekend for the MTA. A bus crashed into an apartment building in Crown Heights. The reason is yet unknown, but the bus was empty.

Three babies and two adults were stabbed at a Queens Maternity Center. The suspect was found in the basement with a slashed wrist and was charged with five counts of attempted murder, remains in custody, and will be undergoing a psychiatric evaluation.

The father who allegedly tossed the body of his dead seven-month-old baby, Mason Saldona, into the East River was indicted on one count of concealment of a corpse.

Twenty Asian desserts to try in NYC, from Eater.

After the Department of Sanitation was evicted from a garage on 30th St, they moved their fleet of garbage trucks to E 60th, 26th and 10th Streets. The neighborhoods are, as you might expect, not thrilled about having multiple garbage trucks parked on their streets. You might say the situation stinks.

Mayor de Blasio announced that the city won’t bail out the doomed Staten Island Wheel project. After $450 million already spent, four 100-ton pedestals are all that have been built.

Anne Russ Federman, the last of Russ and Daughters’ four daughters, passed away on Thursday at the age of 97.

Add bike helmets to the list of things you’re not allowed to bring into Yankee Stadium. CitiField allows guests to bring their helmets to their seats, and the Barclays Center and MSG require checking the helmets at guest services, but it is a free service.

NYC taxpayers footed the bill for City Councilman Andy King’s $3,500 “sensitivity training” after he violated the council’s anti-harassment and discrimination policy.

Paul Simon retired after his final show at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, the last song of the show, tour, and career was “The Sound of Silence.”

S’well is donating 320,000 bottles to the city’s school, one to every high school student in the city, to reduce plastic water bottle waste. It’s also nice advertising for S’well.

The Highbridge Doughboy, a World War I monument, will be rededicated at Macombs Dam Park after 40 years of being in storage.


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