The Briefly for November 18, 2019 – The “Curiously Timed Stop & Frisk Change of Heart by Bloomberg” Edition

De Blasio opposes commercial rent control, the Lizzo of scones in Prospect Heights, Cuomo goes after the Proud Boys, a $350 axe, and more in today’s Daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway disruptions are taking large chunks of the 4, 6, 7, A, D, E, L, and Q lines out of service. (Subway Weekender)

Mayor Bloomberg is “sorry” for supporting stop-and-frisk and the trust he lost from supporting it still bothers him. He has had a very opportune change of heart that timed coincidentally alongside his future-failed presidential run. (HuffPost)

Mayor Bloomberg marketed stop-and-frisk as a way to reduce crime by deterring it before it happened. Instead it was a policy of indirect racial profiling of young black and Latino and was used in an unconstitutional manner. (NY Times)

It was not lost on anyone that a majority of the families first in line for a recent open house were white and wealthy. They were some of the 500 parents paying $200 for a newsletter that gives them the advantage when it comes to high school tours and open houses. (NY Times)

Meet Ashley James, the Guggenheim’s first full-time black curator. (NY Times)

Is anyone surprised to find Mayor de Blasio siding with the real estate industry when it comes to commercial rent control? (Gothamist)

A look at the violent history of Randy Santos, the man arrested for killing four homeless men in Chinatown, and claims he remembers nothing from the night he was found with a bloody metal bar in hand and recorded on video making the attacks. (NY Times)

A look at Decolonize This Place, the activist group behind the viral videos of the NYPD arresting churro ladies and teens in the subways. (NY Times)

Today starts an official effort by City Council staffers to unionize over pay disparities, long hours, and low wages. (Politico)

Congestion pricing goes into effect in January of 2021, which isn’t a lot of time for the MTA’s board to get moving on getting the details of the program together. (Streetsblog)

“Crawl back into your hole, Bigot Boys — there’s no place for hate in our state.” Governor Cuomo may not be the best with insulting nicknames, but it’s good to see him telling the neo-fascist group the Proud Boys to go to hell on behalf of all New Yorkers. (amNewYork)

Of the city’s $20 billion in contracts to private businesses, only 4.9% of them went to minority- or women-owned businesses, which seems like an insanely low number. (amNewYork)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health is relatively tame, but still unnerving. (Patch)

Three people were convicted of manslaughter in the 2015 East Village building explosion that killed two men and triggered by an illegally installed gas line. (amNewYork)

The head of the state’s Committee on Open Government, Bob Freeman, committed a series of inappropriate touching and sexual harassment according to a report from the state’s inspector general. He was fired in June. (Gothamist)

What the hell is anyone in New York City going to do with a $350 axe? No matter, now you can buy one in Williamsburg. (Bedford + Bowery)

Getting real-estate developers to create low-income housing was a fight, getting them to remove “poor doors” was a fight, and getting them to treat all their tenants equally is just as much a fight. (Gothamist)

15 great Caribbean restaurants around the city. (Eater)

An extension of LaGuardia Airport? A solar farm? Homes? Let the speculation on what replaces Rikers Island begin! (NY Times)

Brooklyn Bazaar is closing at the end of the month and is having a liquidation sale. (Brooklyn Vegan)

This review of MeMe’s Diner in Prospect Heights compares its pretzel scone to Lizzo, so take that as high praise. (Grub Street)

Maya Lin’s Eclipsed Time hung from the ceiling in Penn Station for 25 years and while I’ve lived in or near the the city for 100% of that time, I never once noticed it while making my way around the dreadful station. It’s been disassembled and stored off-site while renovations continue, perhaps one day to be noticed and appreciated. (Untapped New York)

Photos: The Penn Station renovations have uncovered some pieces of the original station, the Guastavino tiles and vaulted ceilings of a passageway that was sealed up in the 80s. (Gothamist)

Things are not going great in the contract talks between the MTA and transit union workers. No talks of a strike like in 2005 just yet, even if a strike is technically illegal. (amNewYork)

A guide to NYC’s casual Italian restaurants. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 11, 2019 – The “MTA Can’t Ruin Mercury’s Transit” Edition

The 28th cyclist murdered by drivers, Bloomberg is already the most disliked candidate, the new power lunch, more NYCHA problems, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Another Monday, another week of late night subway disruptions. This week’s inconveniences hit the 2, 3, 4, 6, A, D, E, L, Q, and R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Mercury will be visibly in transit in front of the sun from 7:30am to 1pm today. It’s probably easiest to see on space.com, but if you’ve still got your eclipse gear you can give that a try. (Time Out)

Retired Brigadier General Dr. Loree Sutton is the newest face to announce her candidacy for mayor in 2021 as a Democrat. General Sutton is the founding Commissioner for the Department of Veterans’ Services. (amNewYork)

The 28th cyclist to be murdered by someone behind the wheel of a vehicle was my friend Matthew Travis Palacios. Matt was riding his bike in the bike lane on 1st Ave at 2:30am on Saturday when a dump truck made an illegal turn, hit him and drive way, leaving him severely injured. He was taken to a hospital where he was pronounced dead. I knew Matt through our involvement in local pro wrestling where he was always someone who made me feel welcome and whose star shined bright. He described pro wrestling as his lifeline. “Every night I come home and hear how someone got shot… like, what if I’m next? But with wrestling I feel like, finally, I have a shot.” RIP Matt. (Heavy)

Michael Bloomberg isn’t even officially in the 2020 race and he’s the most disliked candidate among Democrats. Despite that, he’s already polling at 4%, higher than Mayor de Blasio ever did. (Politico)

That dislike may be earned. When Mayor de Blasio took mayorship of the city it was after his “tale of two cities” campaign which highlighted the inequality created during the Bloomberg administration. (NY Times)

Is the Montauk Cutoff Queens’ High Line? It’s near the Sunnyside Yards, which is supposed to be Queens’ Hudson Yards. Maybe we should just let Queens be its own thing? (Forgotten New York)

It started as a thread of tweets and its ending with an investigation into Goldman Sachs by a New York regulator. For some reason, the algorithm which controls spending limits on Apple Cards, which is managed by Goldman Sachs, assigned a man a credit limit 20x that of his wife, despite her credit score being higher than his. The investigation is into gender bias. (HuffPost)

Salt Bae, the joke that won’t go away, settled a lawsuit with four employees he fired over tip distribution to the tune of $230,000. (Jezebel)

Stop and Frisk, another remnant of the Bloomberg administration, was deemed unconstitutional in 2013. That hasn’t stopped the NYPD, who was caught on video stopping and frisking three young men outside NYCHA buildings without justification. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s surge of police officers on the subways is going swimmingly. Here’s a video of NYPD officers removing a man who fell asleep on the platform waiting for an L train from the station. He wasn’t arrested. (Gothamist)

Having vanquished all other crime in the city, four NYPD officers handcuffed a woman selling churros at the Broadway Junction subway station and confiscated her churros and cart. (Gothamist)

Andy Byford, president of the New York City Transit Authority, has a new nickname: Train Daddy. (Patch)

Train Daddy is bringing bus boarding platforms to 14th St to make bus service even speedier along the street. Each platform will save the time buses take to pull over and stop and also sidewalk space for pedestrians. (amNewYork)

The MTA has signed on to the Paris Climate Accord. As it is pointed out, if the MTA improved its service, it could make the biggest impact on carbon emissions is to improve its service. The city already pledged its commitment to the accord in 2017. (Curbed)

Psychology professor at Kingsborough Community College Joshua Dietz is moonlighting as Josh Neal, a white nationalist and the co-host of a podcast alongside known neo-Nazi and literal punching bag Richard Spencer. (Gothamist)

Flavors of Italy in Manhattan is one of the flavors of restaurants closed by the Health Department last week. (Patch)

23 NYCHA buildings had heat outages this weekend as temperatures flirted with 40 degrees, with the total number of tenants without heat hitting 5,500. (Patch)

The power lunch is dead, long live the new power lunch at Sweetgreen. (Eater)

The NYCHA is spending $363 million to upgrade obsolete boilers, but they won’t be ready to be used until 2023. (The City)

The Charging Bull at Bowling Green is going to be moving. It’s had a hell of a year between being assaulted by a banjo and having a bucket of fake blood dumped on it. The bull will be moved somewhere close to the New York Stock Exchange, maybe to be reunited with the Fearless Girl statue? (amNewYork)

Twenty-seven people were arrested this week for allegedly taking part in a massive $18 million medical insurance fraud scheme, which included bribing 911 operators, medical personnel, and police officers for the confidential information of over 60,000 motor vehicle accident victims. (Gothamist)

Did you get your flu shot? There have been 189 confirmed cases of the flu in the state last week. (Patch)

Mary Frost went to “The Deplorables,” a pro-Trump Broadway charity event, so you didn’t have to. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Spikes, bolts, barriers and more of the city’s hostile architecture. (NY Times)

Dandra is a new sculpture in Tribeca Park of a pair of ten-foot-tell butterfly wings was installed to bring awareness to the trans and non-gender conforming community. It’s by Brazilian artist Robem Robierb, known for making Instagram-friendly art, and named for Dandra dos Santos, a trans woman murdered in Brazil in 2017. (Untapped New York)

Brooklyn’s hottest restaurants for November. (Eater)

The Briefly for November 4, 2019 – The “What Makes Anyone A New Yorker?” Edition

The five ballot questions, NYC marathon, the Decolonize This Place demonstration, the NYPL lions are back, the best cocktail bars, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This week’s late-night subway disruptions are hitting hard on a few lines and L service is out on two large portions of the line. Check the changes before you go. (Subway Weekender)

Queens is deciding its next District Attorney, with Democrat Melinda Katz running against Republican Joe Murray. If it feels like Queens already decided on a candidate, you’re remembering the Democratic primary where Katz won a stretched out primary against Tiffany Caban. With Tuesday’s election (no early voting today), here are 19 Melinda Katz campaign promises. (Gotham Gazette)

Study up on the five ballot questions that you’ll be voting on tomorrow. (NY Times)

What makes someone a New Yorker? Does living in New York make you a New Yorker? According to the governor, the answer is no. (Politico)

It’s not news when some old, racist, asshole moves from New York to Florida, no one bats an eye. This time it’s the president. (Patch)

Good riddance” – Andrew Cuomo (Huff Post)

Trump’s attempted move to Florida will likely trigger an audit of his entire life to determine residency. I’m willing to bet he won’t be thrilled about that. (amNewYork)

“Goodbye, don’t come visit us. We’re the greatest city in the United States. We don’t need you.” -Corey Johnson (The Root)

Every Thanksgiving since 1967, Arlo Guthrie has performed at Carnegie Hall on Thanksgiving night. This year will be his last performance. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The City Council passed a bill that will attempt to reduce the private trash hauling industry’s greenhouse emissions and safety. The bill will create 20 collection zones in the city and limit the number of companies that can operate within each zone. (amNewYork)

The $250 million floating park on the Hudson River is starting to take shape. (Gothamist)

A look at the new Hans Haacke survey at the New Museum. (NY Times)

Photos: An impressive gallery of 300 shots from movies and their real-life NYC locations. (filminglocations)

Debating neighborhood boundaries will be an endless debate between New Yorkers. Distorting those boundaries will always be an art among real estate agents. What neighborhood do you really live in? Check the NYC Census 2020 map and turn on the rage machine. (Patch)

52,000 runners took to the streets on Sunday to brave the 26.2 miles of the New York City Marathon. (amNY)

From collecting one million pounds of shed clothes to how menstruation impacts the marathon, the marathon stories from the students of the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism. (New York City News Service)

Congratulations to Kenya’s Geoffrey Kamworor and Joyciline Jepkosgei for their marathon victories. Joyciline Jepkosgei finished in two hours, twenty-two minutes and thirty-eight seconds, seven seconds shy of the record. This was Geoffrey Kamworor’s second victory in three years. (Huff Post)

This video of a bunch of rats fighting to get through a door on the subway is terrifying. (Gothamist)

A ride on the AirTrain is $7.75 as of November 1. (LIC Post)

Two restaurants hit the mythical 100-point violation mark and another hit 97 points among the list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health last week. (Patch)

The NYPD has fought back against accountability and transparency when it comes to body cameras by putting guidelines in place to allow the department to “decide” if footage should be released and allows for released footage to be redacted before public release. The NYCLU argues that the guidelines show the department doesn’t understand the purpose of the cameras in the first place. (Gothamist)

Street parking has been free in the city since 1950. That could be coming to an end. (Gothamist)

Which neighborhoods have the most Michelin star restaurants? (Spoilers, it’s Midtown and NoMad tied at 6) (StreetEasy)

The NYPL lions are back after restoration. (Untapped New York)

Video: Time-lapse of the NYPL lions getting cleaned. (Gothamist)

Tensions are growing over the over-policing of the transit systems as it pertains to the 500 new police officers tasked with preventing fare evasion. 1,000 demonstrators took a “they can’t stop us all” Area 51 approach on Friday night by jumping turnstiles in protest. (Huff Post)

Photos and Videos: The Decolonize This Place protests on Friday. (Gothamist)

17 legendary musicians who called Greenwich Village home. (6sqft)

The 12 best cocktail bars in the city (Eater)

Thanks to reader MG Ashdown for today’s featured image.