The Briefly for September 27, 2019 – The “MTA Buses Will Vaporize You Car with Lasers” Weekend Edition

The City Council looks to silence nighttime construction, Juumane Williams leapfrogs the mayor, no one believes in the MTA Capital Plan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Check this weekend’s subway disruptions before you head out this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Construction noise keeping you up at night? You’re not alone, and the City Council is looking into limiting construction work because the Department of Buildings’ approvals doesn’t seem to be taking neighborhoods into consideration. As you could imagine, the real estate lobby isn’t thrilled with this using the “it’s necessary for a growing city,” but last I checked the city is contracting, not expanding. (NY Times)

Have you seen the ads showing the MTA’s new bus lane enforcement that seemingly installs a car-destroying laser aboard every bus? (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan to deal with 911 calls that deal with emotionally disturbed individuals was supposed to be announced on Wednesday, but the day came and went with no announcement. Public Advocate Jumaane Williams isn’t waiting for the mayor and released his own plan on Thursday. (The City)

The Port Authority will raise tolls, AirTrain ticket prices, and fees for being picked up at the airports by taxis or for-hire vehicles like Ubers or Lyfts. (Curbed)

Tshombe Selby went from usher to performer at the Met Opera for the current production of Porgy and Bess. (amNY)

The city neglected to inspect nearly 10,000 buildings for lead that housed nearly 12,000 children with blood lead levels above the federal standard. Over 2,700 of those cases came after the city was aware of other cases in the same building. An investigation from City Comptroller Scott Stringer revealed a breakdown in the city’s bureaucracy that allowed these conditions to exist and for landlords to get away with these violations. (amNY)

The 25 essential places to drink wine in NYC. (Eater)

A look at Inwood, what the Times calls “Manhattan’s last affordable neighborhood,” which will last as long as people like the Times doesn’t write about it being affordable. (NY Times)

The mystery of the 8’x7′ oil painting hanging in Cortland Alley has been solved, its artist is Diana Wege and the painting is a part of her Earth Requiem series. (Tribeca Citizen)

The city’s Commission on Human Rights released new legal guidance which offers some of the strongest protections against discrimination based on immigration status and national origin in housing, the workplace, and in places like stores, restaurants, schools, and gyms. Telling someone to “speak English” or “go back to your country” in any of these settings would violate the guidance and comes with a fine for up to $250,000. (Patch)

The city’s most exciting new burgers. (Grub Street)

Photos: Inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard, one month before its chapter as Brooklyn’s next destination. (Curbed)

The Nets unveiled a new court to play on, “inspired by Brooklyn.” (6sqft)

The MTA Capital Plan was approved by the MTA’s board unanimously, but no one seems confident that the plan that was voted on is the plan that will be enacted. (Gothamist)

Evon Stephens was sentenced to five years in prison for starting the 2018 fire in the Kings Plaza Shopping Center garage that injured 25 and damaged 135 vehicles. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A Wagner College professor on Staten Island told one of his classes that he wanted to shoot the students in another one of his classes in the head and he was “locked and loaded.” He’s also suspended and under investigation. (Gothamist)

The Queensboro Bridge bike lane and pedestrian situation is more evidence the mayor’s Vision Zero plans don’t have teeth. (Streetsblog)

This story of a feud between two neighbors that has it all. Mannequins, spy cameras, defamation, and a ten million dollar lawsuit. (Gothamist)

Milkshake squirrel, Lollipop Raccoon, etc. A ranking of all of the “move over, Pizza Rat” stories. (Gothamist)

One of the hardest questions to answer. “Where should you go to eat in New York?” The Times attempts to tackle it. (NY Times)

A new damning report from the DOJ’s Office of the Inspector General shows the Metropolitan Detention Center’s heat outage last winter in the coldest week of the year was caused by mismanagement and not fire and lists out all of the ways different ways issues were failed to be addressed. (Gothamist)

The world’s oldest barber, Anthony Mancinelli, is dead at 108. (NY Times)

Dr. Glenn Payne, a fake neuropsychologist, swindled at least $30,000 out of patients. Dr. Payne was the best he could come up with? (Gothamist)

15 best dumpling spots in the city. (Gothamist)

The Briefly for October 5, 2018 – RIP Ms Colombia, A Weekend of Parades, 7 and L Train Closures, and More

No 7 train to Comic Con, RIP to an NYC LGBTQ icon, a century of Italian bread in the Bronx, lots of street closures due to parades and festivals and more in todays daily NYC news digest.

Don’t expect to take the 7 to Comic Con this weekend, because it’s not running. (Gothamist) The mini-L train shutdown continues this weekend and every weekend in October.

For the longest time it was a rite of passage to come across Ms Colombia, resplendent in wild colors and bird on her head. Ms Colombia was found in the waters off Jacob Riis Park on Wednesday morning at 3:30am. She was 64. (Gothamist)

This week end is busy with parades and festivals, which means lots of street closures. Oktoberfest, Nigerian Independence Parade, “Weekend Walks,” Korean Parade, the Upper Broadway Fall Festival, Pulaski Memorial Parade, and the list keeps going and going. (Curbed)

JFK is getting a $13 billion overhaul. Here’s what to expect. (NY Post)

Looking to get out of the city? Try Staten Island! All kidding aside, the best things to do in Snug Harbor. (Brokelyn)

The Red Cat in Chelsea is closing after twenty years. The owner and chef Jimmy Bradley is “ready for a change.” (Eater)

A salute to Madonia, the Italian bakery in the Bronx celebrating 100 years. If you want the pretzels, they only bake them on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. (NY Times)

The Department of Justice is still trying to deport Pablo Villavicencio, the pizza delivery worker detained by ICE. (Gothamist)

The city is working to preserve the Garment District, but manufacturers predict Sunset Park will be the new actual Garment District thanks to a city project at Bush Terminal. (6sqft)

An update on Wednesday’s fire in the East Village from Carlina Rivera, City Council member.

Harvey Weinstein, out on $1 million bail, made a reservation at Mario Batali’s restaurant Babbo. What a pair. Maybe they caught an impromptu Louis C.K. set afterwards and watched some Cosby Show. (Eater)

The 11 best milkshake spots in the city. (Gothamist)

The Slice Out Hunger event on October 10 will offer some of the city’s best slices for only a dollar and proceeds will be split between City Harvest and The Sylvia Center. (Gothamist)


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