The Briefly for July 24, 2019 – The “You Can Beat This Bus in A Walking Race” Edition

A tale of two kinds of fare evasion, an alligator on Staten Island, the Queens Night Market in Manhattan, the Goop of pot, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

City Comptroller Scott Stringer asked the MTA board to slow down their reorganizing plan, requesting that it be thoughtful, thorough, and transparent, three words that do not describe the MTA. (Streetsblog)

The Jet Ski Invasion seems to be just about as punk rock as the East River can get, and for two hours at the end of June, controlled chaos ruled the water. (NY Times)

Want to see the Department of Sanitation’s new trash bins being field-tested? If you’re near Castle Hill in the Bronx, you can keep a lookout for them. (Bronx Times)

The city’s slowest and least reliable bus is the M14A-SBS, at a blazing speed of 4.3 mph. This is the bus is feeling the effect of the petitions and legal arguments to turn 14th St into a busway. (amNY)

If you ask the CEO of the Emerald Media Group, someone who is trying to “make pot pretty” and appears to be trying position herself the Gweneth Paltrow of pot, about privilege and incarceration rates in NYC for people of color, you should expect a goopy answer. (Bushwick Daily)

Who will have the final say over the fate of the Industry City rezoning? Councilmember Carlos Menchaca. The community board will vote, which is purely advisory, the borough president will make a recommendation, but it’s only a recommendation. From there it goes to the City Planning Commission, which can approve, strike down, or make changes, and then it goes to the City Council, which will defer to the local councilmember for approval. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

More rain, more power outages. ConEd hadn’t fully restored power from its man-made power outage on Sunday before Monday’s storm knocked out thousands of more customers’ power. (Curbed)

One of the main issues that the city has been having with heavy rain is that the sewers and grates were not built with this kind of volume in mind. Monday night’s storm dumped over three inches of water, an amount we haven’t seen since 1996. If the grates are clogged, the streets can’t drain. That was the case on the Long Island Expressway near Utopia Parkway, and it would have stayed that way if not for Daphne Youree’s work to clear the grates herself. (Gothamist)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance announced last year that he would stop prosecuting subway fare evasion due to the racial bias that came along with the arrests and arrested dropped by 96%. Meanwhile, the Manhattan DA has prosecuted 100% of the people who were caught evading fares on buses, and those people happen to have disproportionately low income and are people of color. (Streetsblog)

If the New York Times is covering it, you know the trend already crested. The Gray Lady says traditional Irish sessions, a gathering where people perform traditional Irish music, are thriving. (NY Times)

If you’re received preferential rent, described as rent below the legal maximum allowed and accounts for about a quarter of all rent-stabilized apartments, your preferential rent is now your base rent and your rent increases are limited by the Rent Guideline Boards instead of your landlord’s whims. Anything above a 1.5% increase for a one-year lease (or 2.5% for a two year) is illegal. (Gothamist)

The weather-made and ConEd-made blackouts have been devastating to restaurants. It goes beyond the loss of business during the blackouts, like equipment damaged as a result of losing power, or food spoiled by a lack of power. (Eater)

The MTA hired a contractor to handle its homeless outreach in Penn Station and Grand Central Terminal. Is anyone surprised that the MTA’s pick, Bowery Residents Committee, was slacking on the jobs, reporting false data, and regularly ignored people asking for help? A report from the state’s comptroller audit shone a spotlight on the shameful performance. (amNY)

The recount rages on between Queens Borough President Melinda Katz and Public Defender Tiffany Cabán. Cabán’s campaign has spent over $70,000 on its attorneys, while Katz has spent a total of $0 because hers are being provided by the Queens Democratic Party. How does this seem remotely fair? Blame a loophole in the state’s election laws. (Gothamist)

Will the Queens Night Market retain its name when it opens an output in Manhattan? (Time Out)

Pity the real estate developer who might not “break-even” on their plan to build a 105,000 square foot underground gym at the Atlantic Yards. The plan was postponed by the site’s board of directors who are investigating why an environmental impact study was not conducted. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

They won’t be able to legally drink for another six years, but Control the Sound is already playing bars and opening for Questlove. (Bedford + Bowery)

Okay, here are some answers about drinking alcohol on the city’s beaches. Here’s a hint: don’t make it obvious if you won’t want a fine. (amNY)

How to spend 10 hours in the Rockaways. (Brooklyn Based)

The 16th cyclist to be killed by a driver on the city’s streets in 2019 was 17-year-old Alex Cordero on Castleton Ave on Staten Island. (Streetsblog)

The 17th cyclist killed by a driver was being withheld, but they were killed on McGuinness Blvd in Williamsburg. There were a total of 10 cyclists killed by drivers in 2018. (Gothamist)

An oral history of Margot Gayle, an author, city councilmember, activist, and preservationist. (GVSHP)

The Fraunces Tavern unveiled a new exhibition, celebrating the 300 years of history that the building has witnessed and been a part of/a>. (amNY)

Traffic news rarely makes it into The Briefly, but the BQE near the Brooklyn Promenade will have multiple lanes shutdown overnight every night for the next month. (Brooklyn Paper)

The president is suing New York state for its recently passed law that would allow his tax returns to be made public. (Politico)

The Bronx Zoo will be bringing back its holiday light show now that LED technology will allow the Wildlife Conservation Society to run the show without violating its core mission of conservation. (amNY)

An alligator was found in the woods of Staten Island. How the hell did it get there? (SI Live)

It’s time to up your bar game, here are the best boat bars in the city. (6sqft)

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The Briefly for July 23, 2019 – The “Maybe Hackers Can Run the Subways Better” Edition

The In-N-Out Burger mystery, the city’s power outages continue, the subway commuting disasters continue, in pursuit of the perfect ice cream sundae, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Department of Sanitation’s trash museum is only available to be seen once a month when Nelson Molina, the man behind the collection, gives tours, but a few hundred items of the collection is on display at the East Harlem Gallery as part of the “What is Here is Open” exhibition. (Curbed)

The MTA’s proposed express F service is, surprise surprise, opposed by the neighborhoods that don’t have express stops. (Brooklyn Paper)

Transit President Andy Byford hasn’t said what caused Friday’s monumental screw up with the subways, but he has said that it was not the result of outside tampering. At this point, maybe Russia can run our transit system better than the people in charge. (amNY)

Another day, another commuting nightmare. Monday night’s 2, 3, 4, and 5 trains were mostly out of service in Brooklyn fur to faulty signals. Combine that with a storm that provided limited transportation alternatives and it’s just another day on the subways. (Gothamist)

The closest In-N-Out Burger to NYC might be in Texas, so how did a pristine Double-Double end up on the street in Jamaica, Queens? (QNS)

The Department of Education says that they “successfully completed remediation work” or removing lead from the drinking water at many Bushwick schools, but three schools are showing higher levels of lead in the drinking water after the work was complete. (Bushwick Daily)

How far would you go to protect your view? The residents of a building in Chelsea bought the air rights to a neighboring property for $11 million so their views of the Empire State Building remained disturbed. (Curbed)

Photos from Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story remake. (Untapped Cities)

A new city council bill with 22 co-sponsors will fine businesses $1,000 for not accepting cash or charging cash-paying customers more, with a few exceptions, if it is approved. (amNY)

I am the left.” The governor has never been shy about talking shit when it comes to his fellow Democrats. (NY Times)

Despite their performance as of late, including the sky-lighting incident in Astoria and the pipe-explosion in Flatiron, ConEd wants to raise its rates for electricity. What do they think they are, the MTA? (The Indypendent)

50,000 New Yorkers were without power on Sunday and as of Monday morning, there were still 19,000 that were left in the dark. A portion of the blackout was intentionally caused by ConEd in a supposed attempt to prevent wider outages. (Curbed)

The mayor is calling for an investigation to whether the city needs a new entity to provide electricity. The governor has already made direct threats towards replacing ConEd. (Politico)

Why did ConEd choose the neighborhoods that it did in Southeast Brooklyn to intentionally blackout? What was it about Bergen Beach, Mill Basin, Flatlands, and Canarsie made them different than Park Slope, Sunset Park, Clinton Hill, Carroll Gardens, or Dumbo to have their power intentionally shut off? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you lost power, you can fill out a form on ConEd’s website to get some money back. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

In pursuit of the perfect sundae. (Grub Street)

10 suggestions to fix the lighting in your dim apartment. (Street Easy)

Declawing cats is officially illegal in New York state. Technically “declawing” is an amputation surgery which removes the first bone of the cat’s toe and also takes with it tendons and muscles. Unnecessary declawing carries with it a fine. (Gothamist)

Remember the 7 train’s falling debris problem? Never ones to be accused of anything that has the appearance of being timely, the MTA is finally testing new netting to prevent future impalings of anything that dares travel below a 7 train. (amNY)

Ever wonder what a manhole explosion looks like? Here’s a video. (Greenpointers)

The attorney general’s office is invoking the “Son of Sam Law” to prevent the Soho Grifter Anna Sorokin’s profit off the sale of her life rights to Netflix. The Son of Sam Law prevents offenders from profiting off their crimes. (Gothamist)

If you had to do your job using faulty video conferencing systems, you’d be frustrated. If your job was a court interpreter at immigration hearings, it’s orders of magnitude larger than simple frustration. (Gothamist)

Two lawsuits have accused the governor of trying to diminish their power by changing the state’s fusion voting system. (NY Times)

15 secrets of The Frick Collection. (Untapped Cities)

The first report from the federal monitor in charge of overseeing the city’s lead problems in NYCHA developments isn’t very encouraging. (amNY)

The state is considering banning the sale of your phone’s location without your express permission. The bill will be introduced on Tuesday. (NY Times)

“Where should we eat?” says your friend/family member/rando on the street who is visiting New York for the first time. Suddenly you freeze because your collection of restaurants that you visit regularly don’t seem adequate for someone visiting for the weekend and may never return. The first timer’s guide to eating in NYC. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for June 26, 2019 – The “The Triboro: Here Comes A New Subway Line” Edition

Rental reforms, Cardi B faces felony charges, the Central Park squirrel census, WorldPride begins, the new I Voted stickers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A look at changes to the rental laws for everyone. Security deposits are limited to one month’s rent and landlords have 14 days to return them once you’ve moved out, application fees are limited to $20 (even with a background check), and more. (StreetEasy)

A look at how subway delays are tied to the city’s homeless crisis the city is currently facing. In the first three months of 2019, there was nearly the same number of train delays related to the homeless as there was in all of 2014. (NY Times)

Manhattan post-work bar picks. (amNY)

The Triboro is an idea for a new subway line that would start in the Bronx, stop in Randall’s Island, head down through Astoria, cut through Ridgewood and cut through the southern parts of Brooklyn down to Bay Ridge and possibly continue on to the St. George, where the Staten Island Ferry terminates. While it sounds like a fantasy, the proposed cost is less than half of the Second Avenue subway, would connect 17 different subway lines along the route. A bill was introduced by Latrice Walker to the state assembly that would require the MTA to conduct a feasibility study. (Welcome2TheBronx)

How to spend 10 hours in Greenpoint. (Brooklyn Based)

Louis CK continues to have problems with consent when it comes to the venues he performs in. Brooklyn Bazaar released an apology after the masturbating-into-a-plant-while-blocking-the-door comedian appeared at a rental event as a “surprise.” (BrooklynVegan)

The MTA may never make your commute smoother, but a change in perspective and a decent amount of patience can go a long way, which is what author Reny Amoros set out to do in ‘7 Life Lessons the NYC Subway Unintentionally Taught Me.’ (Reny Amoros)

Video: Capturing the ‘Beyond the Streets’ graffiti and street art exhibit in one minute by Chop ‘Em Down Films. (Brooklyn Street Art)

Passive-aggressive notes never go far in NYC, and the one Nobletree Coffee left as a reason for their closing faired just as well. After they tried to blame low foot traffic in the neighborhood, their note was met with another accusing them of having mediocre coffee and bad service. (Eater)

As Gowanus’ rezoning hangs over the neighborhood like the sword of Damaclese, the Landmarks Preservation Commission put five buildings in the neighborhood into consideration for landmark status. (Curbed)

The city’s schools are coming up short when it comes to room for special education children in pre-Kindergarten. At the low end, the city is 200 seats short, but program closures put the number closer to 300. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Harbir Parmar was sentenced to three years in prison for kidnapping and sexually assaulting a woman who was supposed to be his Uber fare. He also charged her over $1,000 for the trip and for that he plead guilty of wire fraud. (Gothamist)

A list of places for tourists to go (none of them are “straight to hell) during WorldPride. (NY Times)

These new “I Voted” stickers are boring compared to the subway-themed stickers. (Gothamist)

The first of three ASPCA low-cost vet centers will be built in East New York and is expected to open next year. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Whoops. Looks like Cardi B will be facing 14 total charges, including felonies, a big difference from the two misdemeanors she previously faced for the incident. (Gothamist)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the Bay Ridge Parkway Doctors’ Row Historic District, which consists of 54 row houses constructed between 1906 and 1913. (Curbed)

Feltman’s was the original Coney Island hot dog. For two years a revival of the brand was available in Coney Island, but the operators of Luna Park gave Feltman’s the boot following a series of broken promises from Luna Park. The hot dogs are available elsewhere, but no longer in Coney Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Stranger Things will be taking over the Wonder Wheel (which is not a part of Luna Park) On July 4 and through the weekend as a prelude to Stranger Things season 3, Scoops Ahoy will be selling ice cream, ad the July 4 fireworks will be a special Hawkins Fourth of July Spectacular. (amNY)

Desmond Amofah, a YouTube star who went by Etika, went missing last week was found dead in the East River at the age of 29. (Gothamist)

Is there anything our current president’s administration can’t ruin? On the verge of WorldPride the news came out that the federal government “gifted” a flagpole and LGBT pride flag the NYC Parks Department so it wouldn’t have to appear in a national park. As a result, the NYC Parks Department permanently owns the flagpole. (Gothamist)

The Port Authority, who recently complained that Manhattan’s congestion pricing would be financially unfair to people who use its bridges and tunnels, is looking to raise the price of tolls system-wide and place new tolls on Uber and Lyft drivers accessing any of the area’s airports. The board will vote on it in September. (Politico)

The 2019 Central Park Squirrel Census Report is in! There are 2,373 squirrels that live in Central Park. If you really love squirrels or well-designed products, you can also purchase the Census in book form. (I Love the Upper West Side)

A trip to (and photos from) the Department of Sanitation’s Museum of Trash. (Gothamist)

The everything bagel is everything. Sesame and poppy seeds, accompanied by dried garlic, onion, and salt: Anything else, in addition, is against the law( or it should be). Now that we’ve established that the everything bagel is king of the bagels, who invented the combination? Does the lineage go back further than 1979 at Charlie’s Bagels in Howard Beach? (Atlas Obscura)

Photos from the start of WorldPride. (NY Times)

Facebook is looking at a one million-square-foot lease at 50 Hudson Yards. No public announcement, no massive tax breaks, no helicopter pad on the roof. (The Real Deal)

The Broadway show King Kong announced it will be closing in August after disappointing reviews and ticket sales. (NY Times)

20 of the city’s tastiest and quirkiest ice cream shops. (6sqft)

The mayor’s office lobbied, against a change in the city’s charter aimed at allowing the Civilian Complaint Review Board to prosecute discipline charges when police officers lie during an investigation of misconduct. The mayor’s argument is that the current system works fine. (Gotham Gazette)

Do the police belong at Pride? (NY Times)

21 top restaurants in Flatiron and Gramercy. (Eater)