The Briefly for February 25, 2019 – The “53,269 Tons of Fatberg” Edition

The MTA is ending MetroCard bonuses, Tuesday’s special election for Public Advocate, the East Village’s ongoing changes, parking placards, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are this week’s late night subway changes. (Subway Changes)

The MTA is ending MetroCard bonuses, but a single ride will remain $2.75. (Daily News)

Tomorrow/Tuesday is the special election for Public Advocate, here is a last minute guide to the 17 candidates. (Gotham Gazette)

The city’s Board of Elections threatened to sue the city to block translators from being inside polling locations in tomorrow’s special election for Public Advocate. (NY Post)

As it stands now there will be translators for Russian, Haitian Creole, Yiddish and Polish 100 feet away from 48 different polling locations. If someone wants translation services, they can escort one of the translators into the polling location with them. (Gothamist)

It seems like the entire city is falling apart. The area under Grand Army Plaza’s Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Arch is barricaded off because pieces of the arch have begun falling off. That planned restoration can’t come soon enough. (Brooklyn Paper)

Farewell to St. Marks Comics and the Sidewalk cafe in the East Village. (amNY & The Villager Newspaper)

You know a neighborhood has changed when even the Hell’s Angels are looking to sell their clubhouse. (Curbed)

Drag Queen Story Hour expanded with with a drag-queen beauty workshop teaching young adults to express their gender however they want. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This is what a “fatberg” looks like. A mass of congealed grease and, uh, “personal hygiene” products. (Gothamist)

What’s the point of all of the city’s Juliet balconies? Also, what is a Juliet balcony? (StreetEasy)

55% of New Yorkers don’t drive a car, but that won’t stop the mayor from framing the parking placard abuse conversation from the point of view of someone who does. Maybe because he is driven from Gracie Mansion to his favorite YMCA in Park Slope so he can work out. (Gothamist)

17 kid-friendly restaurants that adults will also enjoy. (Eater)

The greatest tragedy I have seen since I’ve been in politics.” -Governor Cuomo on the Amazon HQ2 deal collapse. (NY Post)

Remember the people who protested the anti-Amazon HQ2 politicians? They were reportedly paid to protest by Sammy Musovic, a real estate developer who has been renovating apartments in Long Island City. (Curbed)

If you’re the “I HAVE to Instagram my breakfast” type, Grub Street has a new recommendation for you. (Grub Street)

Sunshine Laundromat has a secret, it’s up to you to decide if it’s the secret bar or the pinball. (Atlas Obscura)

A class action lawsuit was filed against the warden of the Metropolitan Detention Center centered around the week the jail was without power or heat in January and February. (Gothamist)

220 Riverside Boulevard’s expulsion of the Trump name is almost complete. Jealous? (NY Times)

Remember the notices the city sent out about hairstyle-based discrimination? An Upper East Side Sally Hershberger salon is under investigation for racial discrimination for telling employees that Afros and box-braids did not reflect the image of the neighborhood. (NY Times)

Commercial vehicles aren’t allowed on the Belt Parkway. Someone should tell the Department of sanitation, who smashed a garbage truck into an overpass and caused a three-car accident. (NY Post)

The Armory Show was moved from Pier 92 to Pier 90 after Pier 92 was deemed structurally unsafe by city investigators, causing the cancelation of the Volta art fair. (NY Times)

The MTA is cutting back on their plans to make more subway stations handicapped accessible. This is a result of cutting Andy Byford’s “Fast Forward” plan from $40 billion to $30 billion. This is a plan that already has no funding and the MTA is already scaling it back. (Daily News)

14th Street won’t be getting a busway, but it likely see a new Select Bus Service that connects 14th St to the East Village and Lower East Side. (Chelsea Now)

If someone you love hates cheese, here are 26 recommended restaurants for the cheese-hater in your life. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for January 9, 2019 – The “Great Pizza Recipe Caper of 2019” Edition

The mayor wants to give healthcare to all, Corey johnson wants control of the subways and buses, $26 million was saved in rent thanks to the L train shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Threats of the L train shutdown saved renters in Williamsburg over $26 million in rent. A different version of this story could say “The L train shutdown cost landlords over $26 in rent. (Metro)

“Back of a taxi” is becoming a popular birth spot, with the second baby of the year being delivered while the meter was running. (NY Post)

The second large scale project Staten Island has lost in the last few months when the developers of the Riverside Galleria withdrew their plans after facing pressure from politicians. (The Real Deal)

For now, it seems like you can get a taste of Nolita uptown. The man behind Prince Street Pizza is suing a former chef for allegedly stealing the recipe for his famous spicy pepperoni slice and bringing it to the former chef’s new restaurant Made in New York Pizza on the Upper West Side. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio announce that the city will spend $100 million to provide health care for undocumented immigrants and others who cannot qualify for insurance. His vision is that the city would provide comprehensive care to everyone, including 300,000 undocumented New Yorkers. (NY Times)

The debate over Amazon’s HQ2 has unions squaring off with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union’s opposition at odds over the project with the Service Employees International Union and the Building and Construction Trades Council’s support. (The Real Deal)

The best coffee shops for meetings. (The Infatuation)

Welcome to 2019: the home of New York’s worst measles outbreak in decades. (NY Post)

It’s seemed inevitable that Willits Point was headed towards mega-development, but that inevitability has loomed overhead decades. A stadium for the Mets, a mall, and now the Queensborough Football Club have laid claim to the neighborhood, despite decade-old plans for mixed-income housing. (Gothamist)

SNL’s Michael Che is putting together “A Night for NYCHA” this Friday at Irving Plaza to benefit the Fund for Public Housing, featuring Jeff Ross, Michelle Wolf and a “top secret” lineup of comedians. There is a GoFundMe page for people who can’t attend but still want to donate (amNY)

A lawsuit was dismissed that claimed that Danny Meyer sat atop a New York restaurateur illuminati-esque group which sought to pocket tips intended for their staffs. (Eater)

Whatever happened to the toxic dust the MTA claimed would make a partial L train shutdown impossible? (Gothamist)

A Bronx pedestrian was killed by a driver of a city sanitation truck who was preemptively salting Willis Avenue at E. 138th Street. The driver was suspended and is cooperating with the NYPD. (Streetsblog)

What you need to know about the city’s special election for public advocate. (Curbed)

A dog museum? A dog museum. The AKC Museum of the Dog is opening on February 8 at 101 Park Avenue, bringing paintings, prints, sculptures, porcelain figurines, displays and more to two floors, including the first exhibition “For the Love of All Things Dog.” (USA Today)

Mario Batali, famous for orange Crocs, an apology that pairs with pizza dough cinnamon rolls, and being accused of sexual misconduct, will not be facing criminal charges for two sexual assaults that allegedly took place in 2004 and 2005. (Eater)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will reveal a plan to wrestle control of the MTA’s subways and buses from the MTA within the next two months. Will he shutdown the shutdown of the shutdown? (Streetsblog)

A judge blocked Mayor de Blasio’s attempt to move carriage horses inside Central Park instead of being alongside cars on the streets. A full hearing will take place February 8. (NY Post)

Politicians can’t constitutionally block critics on official social media accounts. Looking at you State Senator Kevin “Kill Yourself” Parker and City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. (Metro)

38 essential restaurants, winter edition. (Eater)

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The Briefly for November 26, 2018 – The “New York’s Foam Party is Ending” Edition

What we hate most about NYC living, not snow good plowing, the styrofoam ban, late night subway changes and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes include some of the MTA’s greatest hits like “There’s No L Train,” “What Happened to The F?,” “Why Isn’t The 7 Running.” and more. (Subway Weekender)

Say goodbye to styrofoam takeout containers, cups, packing peanuts, plates, bowls, and trays as the city’s foam ban goes into effect on January 1. (Gothamist)

Do you live in the suburbs? 18% of city-dwellers said they did. (The Real Deal)

A guide to the different types of Christmas trees. (amNY)

There’s a loophole in campaign finance laws in NY that allow LLCs to act like people and donate up to $65,100 to each statewide candidate. Will the Democrats, who publicly oppose the loophole, close it? (The Real Deal)

New York’s lawsuit against the Trump Foundation can proceed, according to Justice Saliann Scarpulla. (NY Times)

The things we hate most about living in the city. (NY Post)

The unbelievable story of a dog who escaped his home in Canarsie and turned up near Tampa, FL 18 months later. (NY Post)

The Carnegie Deli is back, but only for a week to celebrate the release of Amazon’s Marvelous Mrs. Maisel season 2. (Untapped Cities)

A naked, burned body was found by kids near a Staten Island Elementary school. The NYPD is treating the incident as a homicide. (NY Post)

The map and data that shows conclusively the city completely blew it when it came to plowing during the last snowstorm. (I Quant NY)

Citi Bike added 200 electric bikes to their NYC fleet, but their batteries haven’t been able to keep up with demand. (NY Post)

Lighting By Gregory has turned into $30 Million For Gregory. (Bowery Boogie)

NYC’s original elevated trains in 1868 moved between five and ten miles an hour, which is still faster than the average speed of a Manhattan bus.

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