The Briefly for January 9, 2019 – The “Great Pizza Recipe Caper of 2019” Edition

The mayor wants to give healthcare to all, Corey johnson wants control of the subways and buses, $26 million was saved in rent thanks to the L train shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Threats of the L train shutdown saved renters in Williamsburg over $26 million in rent. A different version of this story could say “The L train shutdown cost landlords over $26 in rent. (Metro)

“Back of a taxi” is becoming a popular birth spot, with the second baby of the year being delivered while the meter was running. (NY Post)

The second large scale project Staten Island has lost in the last few months when the developers of the Riverside Galleria withdrew their plans after facing pressure from politicians. (The Real Deal)

For now, it seems like you can get a taste of Nolita uptown. The man behind Prince Street Pizza is suing a former chef for allegedly stealing the recipe for his famous spicy pepperoni slice and bringing it to the former chef’s new restaurant Made in New York Pizza on the Upper West Side. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio announce that the city will spend $100 million to provide health care for undocumented immigrants and others who cannot qualify for insurance. His vision is that the city would provide comprehensive care to everyone, including 300,000 undocumented New Yorkers. (NY Times)

The debate over Amazon’s HQ2 has unions squaring off with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union’s opposition at odds over the project with the Service Employees International Union and the Building and Construction Trades Council’s support. (The Real Deal)

The best coffee shops for meetings. (The Infatuation)

Welcome to 2019: the home of New York’s worst measles outbreak in decades. (NY Post)

It’s seemed inevitable that Willits Point was headed towards mega-development, but that inevitability has loomed overhead decades. A stadium for the Mets, a mall, and now the Queensborough Football Club have laid claim to the neighborhood, despite decade-old plans for mixed-income housing. (Gothamist)

SNL’s Michael Che is putting together “A Night for NYCHA” this Friday at Irving Plaza to benefit the Fund for Public Housing, featuring Jeff Ross, Michelle Wolf and a “top secret” lineup of comedians. There is a GoFundMe page for people who can’t attend but still want to donate (amNY)

A lawsuit was dismissed that claimed that Danny Meyer sat atop a New York restaurateur illuminati-esque group which sought to pocket tips intended for their staffs. (Eater)

Whatever happened to the toxic dust the MTA claimed would make a partial L train shutdown impossible? (Gothamist)

A Bronx pedestrian was killed by a driver of a city sanitation truck who was preemptively salting Willis Avenue at E. 138th Street. The driver was suspended and is cooperating with the NYPD. (Streetsblog)

What you need to know about the city’s special election for public advocate. (Curbed)

A dog museum? A dog museum. The AKC Museum of the Dog is opening on February 8 at 101 Park Avenue, bringing paintings, prints, sculptures, porcelain figurines, displays and more to two floors, including the first exhibition “For the Love of All Things Dog.” (USA Today)

Mario Batali, famous for orange Crocs, an apology that pairs with pizza dough cinnamon rolls, and being accused of sexual misconduct, will not be facing criminal charges for two sexual assaults that allegedly took place in 2004 and 2005. (Eater)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will reveal a plan to wrestle control of the MTA’s subways and buses from the MTA within the next two months. Will he shutdown the shutdown of the shutdown? (Streetsblog)

A judge blocked Mayor de Blasio’s attempt to move carriage horses inside Central Park instead of being alongside cars on the streets. A full hearing will take place February 8. (NY Post)

Politicians can’t constitutionally block critics on official social media accounts. Looking at you State Senator Kevin “Kill Yourself” Parker and City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. (Metro)

38 essential restaurants, winter edition. (Eater)

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The Briefly for November 26, 2018 – The “New York’s Foam Party is Ending” Edition

What we hate most about NYC living, not snow good plowing, the styrofoam ban, late night subway changes and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes include some of the MTA’s greatest hits like “There’s No L Train,” “What Happened to The F?,” “Why Isn’t The 7 Running.” and more. (Subway Weekender)

Say goodbye to styrofoam takeout containers, cups, packing peanuts, plates, bowls, and trays as the city’s foam ban goes into effect on January 1. (Gothamist)

Do you live in the suburbs? 18% of city-dwellers said they did. (The Real Deal)

A guide to the different types of Christmas trees. (amNY)

There’s a loophole in campaign finance laws in NY that allow LLCs to act like people and donate up to $65,100 to each statewide candidate. Will the Democrats, who publicly oppose the loophole, close it? (The Real Deal)

New York’s lawsuit against the Trump Foundation can proceed, according to Justice Saliann Scarpulla. (NY Times)

The things we hate most about living in the city. (NY Post)

The unbelievable story of a dog who escaped his home in Canarsie and turned up near Tampa, FL 18 months later. (NY Post)

The Carnegie Deli is back, but only for a week to celebrate the release of Amazon’s Marvelous Mrs. Maisel season 2. (Untapped Cities)

A naked, burned body was found by kids near a Staten Island Elementary school. The NYPD is treating the incident as a homicide. (NY Post)

The map and data that shows conclusively the city completely blew it when it came to plowing during the last snowstorm. (I Quant NY)

Citi Bike added 200 electric bikes to their NYC fleet, but their batteries haven’t been able to keep up with demand. (NY Post)

Lighting By Gregory has turned into $30 Million For Gregory. (Bowery Boogie)

NYC’s original elevated trains in 1868 moved between five and ten miles an hour, which is still faster than the average speed of a Manhattan bus.

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The Briefly for September 24, 2018 – The NYPD Fills Secret Quotas With Bogus Tickets Say Whistleblowers

The NYPD’s secret ticket quotas, a weekend of hell from the MTA, the city gets a new school bus czar, no helmets in Yankee stadium and more

NYPD whistleblowers claim that they are pressured to write bogus tickets to meet secret quotas, which confirms pretty much every single person who has ever gotten a ticket’s suspicions.

Public schools CEO Eric Goldstein was fired by the DOE after over 100,000 complaints were filed about bus transportation in the first month of school. He’ll be replaced by Kevin Moran, a former executive director of the DOE’s field support services in Staten Island.

Eddie’s Sweet Shop on Metropolitan Avenue in Forest Hills is the city’s oldest ice cream shop, dating back to 1909.

A tribute to the city car, a “banged up, asthmatic vehicle that is, at times, held together by duct tape,” by The New York Times.

ICE deported Gloria Hernandez Suarez of Queens after living in the Uniter States for 33 years last week without notice. She had been held in a detention facility in New Jersey since July.

Grand Central Terminal is celebrating the twenty years anniversary of its 1998 renovation with 1998 pricing on October 1.

How 1918’s prohibition restructured real estate and architecture in NYC.

A fight on a 2 subway car ended with everyone on board getting hit with pepper spray.

The ceiling collapsed on the 4/5 platform on Friday morning at the Atlantic Avenue-Barclays Center subway stop. This is the second time this year that a ceiling collapsed.

It was a banner weekend for the MTA. A bus crashed into an apartment building in Crown Heights. The reason is yet unknown, but the bus was empty.

Three babies and two adults were stabbed at a Queens Maternity Center. The suspect was found in the basement with a slashed wrist and was charged with five counts of attempted murder, remains in custody, and will be undergoing a psychiatric evaluation.

The father who allegedly tossed the body of his dead seven-month-old baby, Mason Saldona, into the East River was indicted on one count of concealment of a corpse.

Twenty Asian desserts to try in NYC, from Eater.

After the Department of Sanitation was evicted from a garage on 30th St, they moved their fleet of garbage trucks to E 60th, 26th and 10th Streets. The neighborhoods are, as you might expect, not thrilled about having multiple garbage trucks parked on their streets. You might say the situation stinks.

Mayor de Blasio announced that the city won’t bail out the doomed Staten Island Wheel project. After $450 million already spent, four 100-ton pedestals are all that have been built.

Anne Russ Federman, the last of Russ and Daughters’ four daughters, passed away on Thursday at the age of 97.

Add bike helmets to the list of things you’re not allowed to bring into Yankee Stadium. CitiField allows guests to bring their helmets to their seats, and the Barclays Center and MSG require checking the helmets at guest services, but it is a free service.

NYC taxpayers footed the bill for City Councilman Andy King’s $3,500 “sensitivity training” after he violated the council’s anti-harassment and discrimination policy.

Paul Simon retired after his final show at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, the last song of the show, tour, and career was “The Sound of Silence.”

S’well is donating 320,000 bottles to the city’s school, one to every high school student in the city, to reduce plastic water bottle waste. It’s also nice advertising for S’well.

The Highbridge Doughboy, a World War I monument, will be rededicated at Macombs Dam Park after 40 years of being in storage.


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