The Briefly for July 23, 2019 – The “Maybe Hackers Can Run the Subways Better” Edition

The In-N-Out Burger mystery, the city’s power outages continue, the subway commuting disasters continue, in pursuit of the perfect ice cream sundae, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Department of Sanitation’s trash museum is only available to be seen once a month when Nelson Molina, the man behind the collection, gives tours, but a few hundred items of the collection is on display at the East Harlem Gallery as part of the “What is Here is Open” exhibition. (Curbed)

The MTA’s proposed express F service is, surprise surprise, opposed by the neighborhoods that don’t have express stops. (Brooklyn Paper)

Transit President Andy Byford hasn’t said what caused Friday’s monumental screw up with the subways, but he has said that it was not the result of outside tampering. At this point, maybe Russia can run our transit system better than the people in charge. (amNY)

Another day, another commuting nightmare. Monday night’s 2, 3, 4, and 5 trains were mostly out of service in Brooklyn fur to faulty signals. Combine that with a storm that provided limited transportation alternatives and it’s just another day on the subways. (Gothamist)

The closest In-N-Out Burger to NYC might be in Texas, so how did a pristine Double-Double end up on the street in Jamaica, Queens? (QNS)

The Department of Education says that they “successfully completed remediation work” or removing lead from the drinking water at many Bushwick schools, but three schools are showing higher levels of lead in the drinking water after the work was complete. (Bushwick Daily)

How far would you go to protect your view? The residents of a building in Chelsea bought the air rights to a neighboring property for $11 million so their views of the Empire State Building remained disturbed. (Curbed)

Photos from Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story remake. (Untapped Cities)

A new city council bill with 22 co-sponsors will fine businesses $1,000 for not accepting cash or charging cash-paying customers more, with a few exceptions, if it is approved. (amNY)

I am the left.” The governor has never been shy about talking shit when it comes to his fellow Democrats. (NY Times)

Despite their performance as of late, including the sky-lighting incident in Astoria and the pipe-explosion in Flatiron, ConEd wants to raise its rates for electricity. What do they think they are, the MTA? (The Indypendent)

50,000 New Yorkers were without power on Sunday and as of Monday morning, there were still 19,000 that were left in the dark. A portion of the blackout was intentionally caused by ConEd in a supposed attempt to prevent wider outages. (Curbed)

The mayor is calling for an investigation to whether the city needs a new entity to provide electricity. The governor has already made direct threats towards replacing ConEd. (Politico)

Why did ConEd choose the neighborhoods that it did in Southeast Brooklyn to intentionally blackout? What was it about Bergen Beach, Mill Basin, Flatlands, and Canarsie made them different than Park Slope, Sunset Park, Clinton Hill, Carroll Gardens, or Dumbo to have their power intentionally shut off? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you lost power, you can fill out a form on ConEd’s website to get some money back. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

In pursuit of the perfect sundae. (Grub Street)

10 suggestions to fix the lighting in your dim apartment. (Street Easy)

Declawing cats is officially illegal in New York state. Technically “declawing” is an amputation surgery which removes the first bone of the cat’s toe and also takes with it tendons and muscles. Unnecessary declawing carries with it a fine. (Gothamist)

Remember the 7 train’s falling debris problem? Never ones to be accused of anything that has the appearance of being timely, the MTA is finally testing new netting to prevent future impalings of anything that dares travel below a 7 train. (amNY)

Ever wonder what a manhole explosion looks like? Here’s a video. (Greenpointers)

The attorney general’s office is invoking the “Son of Sam Law” to prevent the Soho Grifter Anna Sorokin’s profit off the sale of her life rights to Netflix. The Son of Sam Law prevents offenders from profiting off their crimes. (Gothamist)

If you had to do your job using faulty video conferencing systems, you’d be frustrated. If your job was a court interpreter at immigration hearings, it’s orders of magnitude larger than simple frustration. (Gothamist)

Two lawsuits have accused the governor of trying to diminish their power by changing the state’s fusion voting system. (NY Times)

15 secrets of The Frick Collection. (Untapped Cities)

The first report from the federal monitor in charge of overseeing the city’s lead problems in NYCHA developments isn’t very encouraging. (amNY)

The state is considering banning the sale of your phone’s location without your express permission. The bill will be introduced on Tuesday. (NY Times)

“Where should we eat?” says your friend/family member/rando on the street who is visiting New York for the first time. Suddenly you freeze because your collection of restaurants that you visit regularly don’t seem adequate for someone visiting for the weekend and may never return. The first timer’s guide to eating in NYC. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for June 26, 2019 – The “The Triboro: Here Comes A New Subway Line” Edition

Rental reforms, Cardi B faces felony charges, the Central Park squirrel census, WorldPride begins, the new I Voted stickers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A look at changes to the rental laws for everyone. Security deposits are limited to one month’s rent and landlords have 14 days to return them once you’ve moved out, application fees are limited to $20 (even with a background check), and more. (StreetEasy)

A look at how subway delays are tied to the city’s homeless crisis the city is currently facing. In the first three months of 2019, there was nearly the same number of train delays related to the homeless as there was in all of 2014. (NY Times)

Manhattan post-work bar picks. (amNY)

The Triboro is an idea for a new subway line that would start in the Bronx, stop in Randall’s Island, head down through Astoria, cut through Ridgewood and cut through the southern parts of Brooklyn down to Bay Ridge and possibly continue on to the St. George, where the Staten Island Ferry terminates. While it sounds like a fantasy, the proposed cost is less than half of the Second Avenue subway, would connect 17 different subway lines along the route. A bill was introduced by Latrice Walker to the state assembly that would require the MTA to conduct a feasibility study. (Welcome2TheBronx)

How to spend 10 hours in Greenpoint. (Brooklyn Based)

Louis CK continues to have problems with consent when it comes to the venues he performs in. Brooklyn Bazaar released an apology after the masturbating-into-a-plant-while-blocking-the-door comedian appeared at a rental event as a “surprise.” (BrooklynVegan)

The MTA may never make your commute smoother, but a change in perspective and a decent amount of patience can go a long way, which is what author Reny Amoros set out to do in ‘7 Life Lessons the NYC Subway Unintentionally Taught Me.’ (Reny Amoros)

Video: Capturing the ‘Beyond the Streets’ graffiti and street art exhibit in one minute by Chop ‘Em Down Films. (Brooklyn Street Art)

Passive-aggressive notes never go far in NYC, and the one Nobletree Coffee left as a reason for their closing faired just as well. After they tried to blame low foot traffic in the neighborhood, their note was met with another accusing them of having mediocre coffee and bad service. (Eater)

As Gowanus’ rezoning hangs over the neighborhood like the sword of Damaclese, the Landmarks Preservation Commission put five buildings in the neighborhood into consideration for landmark status. (Curbed)

The city’s schools are coming up short when it comes to room for special education children in pre-Kindergarten. At the low end, the city is 200 seats short, but program closures put the number closer to 300. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Harbir Parmar was sentenced to three years in prison for kidnapping and sexually assaulting a woman who was supposed to be his Uber fare. He also charged her over $1,000 for the trip and for that he plead guilty of wire fraud. (Gothamist)

A list of places for tourists to go (none of them are “straight to hell) during WorldPride. (NY Times)

These new “I Voted” stickers are boring compared to the subway-themed stickers. (Gothamist)

The first of three ASPCA low-cost vet centers will be built in East New York and is expected to open next year. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Whoops. Looks like Cardi B will be facing 14 total charges, including felonies, a big difference from the two misdemeanors she previously faced for the incident. (Gothamist)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the Bay Ridge Parkway Doctors’ Row Historic District, which consists of 54 row houses constructed between 1906 and 1913. (Curbed)

Feltman’s was the original Coney Island hot dog. For two years a revival of the brand was available in Coney Island, but the operators of Luna Park gave Feltman’s the boot following a series of broken promises from Luna Park. The hot dogs are available elsewhere, but no longer in Coney Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Stranger Things will be taking over the Wonder Wheel (which is not a part of Luna Park) On July 4 and through the weekend as a prelude to Stranger Things season 3, Scoops Ahoy will be selling ice cream, ad the July 4 fireworks will be a special Hawkins Fourth of July Spectacular. (amNY)

Desmond Amofah, a YouTube star who went by Etika, went missing last week was found dead in the East River at the age of 29. (Gothamist)

Is there anything our current president’s administration can’t ruin? On the verge of WorldPride the news came out that the federal government “gifted” a flagpole and LGBT pride flag the NYC Parks Department so it wouldn’t have to appear in a national park. As a result, the NYC Parks Department permanently owns the flagpole. (Gothamist)

The Port Authority, who recently complained that Manhattan’s congestion pricing would be financially unfair to people who use its bridges and tunnels, is looking to raise the price of tolls system-wide and place new tolls on Uber and Lyft drivers accessing any of the area’s airports. The board will vote on it in September. (Politico)

The 2019 Central Park Squirrel Census Report is in! There are 2,373 squirrels that live in Central Park. If you really love squirrels or well-designed products, you can also purchase the Census in book form. (I Love the Upper West Side)

A trip to (and photos from) the Department of Sanitation’s Museum of Trash. (Gothamist)

The everything bagel is everything. Sesame and poppy seeds, accompanied by dried garlic, onion, and salt: Anything else, in addition, is against the law( or it should be). Now that we’ve established that the everything bagel is king of the bagels, who invented the combination? Does the lineage go back further than 1979 at Charlie’s Bagels in Howard Beach? (Atlas Obscura)

Photos from the start of WorldPride. (NY Times)

Facebook is looking at a one million-square-foot lease at 50 Hudson Yards. No public announcement, no massive tax breaks, no helicopter pad on the roof. (The Real Deal)

The Broadway show King Kong announced it will be closing in August after disappointing reviews and ticket sales. (NY Times)

20 of the city’s tastiest and quirkiest ice cream shops. (6sqft)

The mayor’s office lobbied, against a change in the city’s charter aimed at allowing the Civilian Complaint Review Board to prosecute discipline charges when police officers lie during an investigation of misconduct. The mayor’s argument is that the current system works fine. (Gotham Gazette)

Do the police belong at Pride? (NY Times)

21 top restaurants in Flatiron and Gramercy. (Eater)

The Briefly for March 28, 2019 – The “Everyone Flushes Their Dog’s Poop Down the Toilet, Right?” Edition

A bagel abomination, the NYPD fights new parking placard laws, the NYC James Beard Award finalists, no one wants to see more cops on buses, and more in today’s daily NYC news brief.

Here is an argument that Times Square is not the Gowanus Canal dining options and it is actually a good neighborhood for food. (Grub Street)

The latest bagel abomination is bagels sliced like loaves of bread instead of a sandwich. Arrest this man. (Gothamist)

The state and city’s Democrats have no love for the real estate industry. Can they successfully lobby the left to do their bidding? (The Real Deal)

The answer appears to be “yes.” The proposed pied-à-terre tax would affect 280 people, and in the face of opposition by the real estate industry, the state’s legislators have appeared to back down in favor of a transfer tax. The estimated difference in revenue is $250 million ($400 million for the transfer tax and vs $650 million for the pied-à-terre tax). A $250 million reduction for the benefit of 280 people. (Curbed)

You bring your dog’s poop home in bags and flush it down the toilet, right? Well, that’s what a deputy director at the Department of Sanitation thinks you should do. Legally, it is 100% legal to toss those poop bags in a public garbage can. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is seeking support (and signatures) in opposition of a rezoning that would cast a literal shadow over portions of the garden, causing irreparable harm to the plants. (bbg.org)

A truck driver hit and killed a cyclist in Midtown, the third driver from Approved Oil to kill a pedestrian or cyclist in two years. The driver allegedly fled the scene but was not charged with leaving the scene of a crash, which is a felony. (Gothamist)

Just when you thought a commute couldn’t get worse, a water main break caused 7th Avenue to close between 27th and 34th St. (NY Post)

NYC restaurants lost jobs (3.4%) for the first time in ten years in 2018. At the same time, the total number of restaurants increased by 2,000. (Eater)

The city’s 2019 James Beard Award finalists are in. Make your reservations while you still can. (Eater)

Time Out has some feelings about the list. (Time Out)

The city wants your feedback on these ideas for the Shirley Chisholm monument in Prospect Park. (amNY)

Yankees and vintage train fans have something to look forward to. Today’s home opener this year will be accompanied by a 102-year-old subway train bringing fans to the stadium on the 4 train. (6sqft)

Where to eat at Yankee Stadium. (Eater)

A new Grand Street Bridge will be complete by 2027. Now we just have to hope that the current span between Queens and Brooklyn will last that until then. (QNS)

Turns out no one wants cops on city buses enforcing everyone pay their fares. 75% of bus riders are people of color with a median income under $30k and advocates and politicians are see the idea of policing that specific demographic as racial profiling. (Streetsblog)

The death of one-year-old Darwin Gonzalez-Santana in December was ruled a homicide after fentanyl and heroin were found in his system. His father is not in police custody and his mother is already in custody for another offense. (NY Post)

Eight remnants of colonial NYC that you can still touch. (Untapped Cities)

For $25,000, you can dine (and attempt to influence) Governor Cuomo. Who needs campaign finance reform when it costs 19 ounces of gold to share a meal? (NY Times)

The review process for Mayor de Blasio’s Rikers Island alternative jail system is underway. (Bklyner)

Horrifically, someone fell face first onto the track of the L train in Brooklyn. Witnesses couldn’t get him off the tracks in time, but they were able to signal to the conductor to stop the train before he was run over. (Gothamist)

Mark your calendars, Fleet Week is May 22 – 28. (Gothamist)

Congestion pricing, explained. (Curbed)

If you don’t know what Williamsburg looked like in the 90s, you owe it to yourself to take a look at the neighborhood pre-hipster. (Bedford + Bowery)

The latest volley in the legal battle between the city and Ballyhoo Media, the operator of the floating LED billboards in the city’s waterways, is a lawsuit form the city with $25,000 fines for each day the city says Ballyhoo broke zoning rules. (Patch)

Mayor de Blasio said delivery workers who are caught using electric bikes won’t be directly targeted by legal action. The NYPD doesn’t care what he says. (Gothamist)

The socialite grifter’s lawyer has an interesting defense planned: She’s just like Sinatra. (NY Post)

The City Council has unlikely opposition in their quest to fight parking placard abuse: the NYPD. The city’s likely biggest abusers say that the job they’re doing is already top notch. (amNY)

TGI Friday’s, have you no shame? (NY Post)

An interview with Brittany Bond, the purveyor of Common Books, the pushcart bookstore that can be found in the Lower East Side year round. (Bowery Boogie)

A list of good places to break up with someone in public. (The Infatuation)

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