The Briefly for December 12, 2019 – The “New Subway Signals Have Been Foiled by Snow” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: LIC gets a Trader Joe’s, a plan to punish bad drivers in the NYPD, the Javits center construction is set to be mostly complete by the spring, and more

Today – Low: 32˚ High: 35˚
Clear throughout the day.

With four Republican state senators not seeking re-election in 2020, the path is open for the state’s Democrats to form a supermajority. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Is there room in NYC for this Frankenstein’s monster of wafer-thin pizza? We accepted Detroit-style, we’d even begrudgingly allow Chicago-style to come in to the city, we we’re hot about Rhode Island-style, but this? Has pizza science finally gone too far? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

There are calls for Mayor de Blasio to cancel SantaCon. While SantaCon being an event sponsored by the mayor’s office, there is a petition you can sign. (EV Grieve)

Columbia University made a promise 14 years ago to create a new public school in exchange for a 49-year rent-free lease on a piece of land. Imagine the surprise when Columbia presented a plan to build a 400-foot-tall residential tower on that land. Columbia has been slowly expanding its footprint and the neighborhood is justifiably worried. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

People move to NYC every day, so every day it’s useful to have a link that answers the question “what’s a bodega?” (Lauren Paley for StreetEasy)

The 7 train’s new signal communication was foiled on Wednesday by… some snow and slush. Yup. The MTA spent $800 million on new signals and there’s a “known phenomenon” that’s been known about since March. When a transponder malfunctions due to snow or slush, the train essentially becomes “lost” to the MTA’s computers and its speed is reduced from 50 mph to 25 mph. Very reassuring. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

New York City, get ready to be REMEd. Of course REME is the new Racially and Ethnically Motivated Extremism unit of the NYPD targeting far-right and extremist hate groups like The Proud Boys or Atomwaffen Division. This comes in response to the shootings in New Jersey. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Turns out, those no-doors, dangle-your-feet-over-NYC-for-maximally-impressive-content- helicopter experiences may be pretty unsafe — by design. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

Anti-violence programs across Coney Island are getting $850,000 in city funding to address an uptick in gun violence in the community, starting with gaps in social services. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A remote starting feature on a Lexus caused the death of 21-year-old Michael Kosanovich last week on 148th St in South Jamaica. Kosanovich was crushed between the Lexus and another car when the Lexus rolled forward after being started. Pedestrians were able to push the car off of him, but the car slipped and pinned him between the cars for a second time. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Former President Clinton visited Bed-Stuy’s Cornerstone Baptist Church to check out the energy-efficient upgrades the church was able to install thanks to a commitment from the Clinton Global Initiative University. (Raymond Hagans for The Brooklyn Reader)

The latest episode of the What’s The [DATA] Point? podcast takes a look at the $28.8 billion cumulative four-year budget gap for New York between 2020 and 2023. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

From the team behind the excellent pizza and wine restaurant Ops comes Leo, a new pizza place in Williamsburg split between a cafe/slice shop and a restaurant. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Harvey Weinstein and more than 30 actresses and former employees accusing him of sexual harassment and rape reached a tentative $25 million settlement that would not require Weinstein to pay a single dime out of his own pocket. The money would come from the $47 million settlement closing down the Weinstein Company. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best and worst architecture of 2019. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

A two-year-old boy was caught between a moving 2 train and the platform at Fulton Street during rush hour on Wednesday. He died at the hospital. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The Dry aged Red Hook Tavern burger at Red Hook Tavern, the gruyère fritters at Crown Shy, the Sicilian slice and regular slice at F & F Pizzeria, and the rest of Pete Wells’s top 10 dishes of 2019. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Long Island City is getting a Trader Joe’s. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

The Department of Transportation has a plan to address the insanity on the roads surrounding Essex Place, but it’s gonna take some time. Not months, but years, and by then congestion pricing will be in place. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A combination of miscommunication and faulty construction lead to the slow response to 80 homes’ basements being flooded with raw sewage on Thanksgiving weekend. (Max Parrott for amNewYork)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (Martha Schwindener for NY Times)

The construction at the Javits center is on-time, on-budget, and expected to be “substantially complete” by the spring. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The cleanup of the Newtown Creek has hit some murky waters. The EPA decided on a plan that reduces the combined sewer overflow pollution by 61% rather than an option that would eliminate it completely. Combined sewer overflow basically boils down to the neighborhoods toilets flushing directly into the creek when the sewer system is overloaded. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Interested in the city’s combined sewer overflows? You might enjoy the @combinedsewer Twitter account. It tweets when the city’s sewer system can’t handle a combination of sewage and rain and the overflow is released into the city’s waterways. (@combinedsewer)

The de Blasio administration is getting moving on actually punishing NYPD officers with parking placard for being unable to follow the law while behind the wheel of their own cars. Starting next year, NYPD officers and employees will lose their city-issued parking placard if they get too many moving violation tickets. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Whoops! A mixup meant that a dozen city classrooms didn’t receive the emergency lead-removal that were supposed to before the school year started. (Christoper Werth for Gothamist)

A calculator to help you decide if you should be renting or buying in NYC. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

The best sports bars in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 21, 2019 – The “Raccoons Take Control, De Blasio’s MTA Influence Weakens” Edition

The best falafel, the city pays out $1 billion in lawsuits annually, Corey Johnson continues the tradition of playing politics with the budget, and more in today’s daily NYC digest.

Trash pandas rule the city’s parks at night, but now they are turning their little bandit-faced gaze towards becoming the kinds of the subterranean. Raccoon-related subway delays are up this year, way up. (Gothamist)

Let’s call it The Great Bell Blvd Oil Heist. The NYPD arrested Nigeme Rowe for stealing used oil from restaurants that put out the oil for recycling companies to be turned into biodiesel. (QNS)

The Daily News’ owners sold 25% of the company to the Tribune Company, the “destroyer of newspapers.” Sound promising. (Patch)

The city has paid $84.5 million annually to the victims of traffic violence caused by city employees in the Departments of Fire, Sanitation, Police, Transportation, and Parks. Add in all claims against the city? The number balloons to $1 billion. (Streetsblog)

The candy vendor arrested in a Harlem subway station last week plans to sue the city for $5 million for excessive force used by the four police officers who arrested him. (amNewYork)

The Queens DA will release its internal “credibility database” of cops who are suspected of lying in court. (Gothamist)

Are there enough places to buy coffee in NYC? Bandit is a new company that plans to open a coffee stand where you can buy a cup via their app with their eventual goal to be within a five minute walk from anyone who wants coffee. (Eater)

Broadway is Broadway, but Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway and smaller theaters far beyond still has a strong economical presence. Non-Broadway theater generates $584 million annually and employs 3,000 people according to a new study form the mayor’s office. (NY Times)

Five holiday decoration tips for small spaces, including the very sad “put branches in the shape of a tree on your wall.” (StreetEasy)

Lyft and the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) announced the formation of a new Equity Advisory Board for Citi Bike to discuss and evaluate Citi Bike’s equity strategy to better serve New York. (Curbed)

This look back at the history of 57th St starts with the quintessential Manhattan question: “Does anyone actually want to go to Midtown?” (Gothamist)

13 Brooklyn condos with the best waterfront views. (6sqft)

The case for ending free parking in NYC is getting stronger. (NY Times)

Here are the things that New Yorkers are looking for when they search for a new home. Here’s a hint: low crime and good light. (Localize Labs)

Add another name to the great fried chicken fight of 2019. From Philly, the latest contestant is Starliner in Bushwick. (Gothamist)

Evictions are down in Manhattan, Staten Island, Brooklyn, and Queens, but not in the Bronx according to a new report issued by NYU’s Furman Center. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The Times is searching for stories about your neighborhood bodega. (NY Times)

Is your regular hookup becoming “a thing?” Here’s where to go when you’re not sure that your friend with benefits might want to have the “what ARE we?” talk. (The Infatuation)

Mayor de Blasio’s influence over the MTA is diminishing as one of his appointees, Veronica Vanterpool, is resigning from the MTA’s board. Vanterpool was also the youngest board member at 44 and its only woman of color. (Politico)

The MTA’s automated bus-mounted camera ticketing system is coming to the 14th St busway and will be online on December 2 and for the first sixty days, drivers will only receive a warning. (Gothamist)

Ten city zip codes are among the United States’ most expensive when it comes to home prices at numbers 5 and 8, respectively. Tribeca and Hudson Square broke through to the top ten. (Patch)

It seems that as long as you say you “didn’t realize” you hit and killed someone with your car, the NYPD will absolve you of wrongdoing. (Streetsblog)

A second New Yorker has died due to a vaping-related illness. (Patch)

More than two dozen homes in Dyker Heights have begun their annual Christmas light transformation. (Brooklyn Paper)

In September of 2018, the Department of Sanitation begun parking garbage trucks overnight on 10th between 1st and 2nd, which quite honestly sucks for the people who live on that block. It took 14 months, but State Senator Brad Hoylman and State Assemblymember Deborah J. Glick have introduced a bill that will prevent the DSNY from parking on residential streets. As a result, the DSNY has decided to move its trucks to Pier 42 for the next three months. (EV Grieve)

Starting next year, some buildings in the city will be required to display a letter grade, similar to restaurants, showing how energy efficient they are. (NY Times)

Is Corey Johnson using the City Council’s budget to reward his allies and make political deals? Yes. Has this been common practice in the City Council for long before Corey Johnson because the speaker? Also yes. (Politico)

NYC needs more weird, like Mother Pigeon, the bird woman artist and animal rights advocate who makes acrylic pigeon sculptures and sets them up in Union Square. (Viewing NYC)

Inside a celebration of Fet Gede in Downtown Brooklyn, the Haitian voodoo Festival of the Dead. (NY Times)

The best falafel in NYC. (Grub Street)

Thank you to MG Ashdown for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 18, 2019 – The “Is Astoria the Coolest Neighborhood in the City?” Edition

How to make congestion pricing work, National Grid continues to hold customers’ service hostage, everyone hates the new license plates, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Elizabeth Warren hit Washington Square Park on Monday night to give a presidential speech on corruption. (NY Times)

Kopitiam is the only restaurant in the city to be on Bon Appétit’s 10 Best New Restaurants in America list. (Grub Street)

Time Out put together a list of the 50 coolest neighborhoods to visit in the world. On the list? Astoria. Here are three spots in Astoria to visit.(Time Out)

How will congestion pricing pay for the MTA’s 2020-2024 capital plan? A flat fee of $6.62 that could go up to $9.18 during the day and $3.06 at night and with no exceptions. (Gothamist)

Uber and Lyft drivers are showing their true power over the city with a protest against Uber and Lyft’s non-compliance with the state’s minimum wage laws by driving slowly in packs down some of the city’s busiest roads like FDR Drive and the Brooklyn Bridge. (Gothamist)

If you don’t have $11 million on hand, you can still see what an 11-room residence looks like in the Dakota on West 72nd Street. (6sqft)

The Department of Transportation is installing 50 public charging stations for electric vehicles across the city with each station being able to charge two vehicles. (Jackson Heights Post)

Six places to go apple picking near the city without a car. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“I am unequivocally against, and will never, ever, allow Industry City to move forward with a rezoning proposal through ULURP in the form that they submitted to the City Planning Commission in February earlier this year.” – City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca (Curbed)

Turns out 60% of voters polled are opposed to the new rule to replace license plates over ten years old. 75% of voters polled oppose the $25 fee for the newly designed plates. (Patch)

Donald Trump’s childhood home is up for auction in Queens. You’ve got until November 14 to bid. (Curbed)

National Grid continues to hold customers’ gas service hostage in protest of the state’s rejection of the billion-dollar Williams Pipeline that would terminate in the Rockaways over concerns it could contaminate the New York Harbor. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here are the views from the top of the city’s tallest residential building. (Curbed)

Is Sunnyside Yards the next Hudson Yards? (Greenpointers)

A food tour of Little Italy’s Feast of San Gennaro. (6sqft)

Rates of violence in Rikers Island is up across the board, including violence between inmates, inmates assaults against staff, use of force against prisoners, and use of force against adolescent inmates. (Politico)

The ten oldest and intact cemeteries in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The city has spent $673 million on NYC Ferry but hasn’t spent a dime on Citi Bikes. NYC Ferry averages 17,842 riders per day, Citi Bike recently hit a new record of 91,529 trips on Thursday, September 5. (Streetsblog)

Here’s who over 100 people will be crawling down 1.5 miles on Manhattan’s streets this weekend. (Untapped Cities)

26 of the Upper East Side’s best bars and resaurants. (Eater)

thanks to reader The Unisphere from Lindsey for today’s featured photo.