The Briefly for December 6, 2019 – The “Your New Year’s Wishes Will Become Literal Trash” Weekend Edition

In today’s daily NYC digest: The weekend’s subway disruptions, coffee rat, Gambino family mobsters were caught for racketeering, the best unsing restaurants, and more

This weekend’s subways are a mess of fun, including a few suspensions. Better check before you go if you’re along the 4, 5, A, E, J, N, Q, and R trains. (Lance for Subway Weekender)

The owners of Luna Park in Coney Island are raising the rent on the independently owned businesses on the Riegelmann Boardwalk by 500% on January 1. On top of the rent, they also take 10% of the sales as well. It’s a greedy move by the largest lease-holder in Coney Island, who tried to evict all the businesses on the boardwalk in 2010. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The LinkNYC kiosks were supposed to by “a critical step toward a more equal, open, and connected city,” according to the mayor. Instead, they’re digital billboards, an additional form of surveillance, magnets for controversy, and of the 7,500 that were to be installed, only 1,774 are in operation. With less than 25% of the promised numbers actually delivered, they have done little to address the digital divide in the city. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

Spend a Sunday with Cheslie Kryst, Miss USA. (Tammy La Gorce for NY Times)

Your wishes for 2020 can become literal trash less than an hour into the new year. If you want to see your hopes and dreams end up in the sewer, you can submit a new year wish to be included on Times Square confetti in-person or online. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

Is the MTA’s “Rockaway Parkway Station” an abbreviation or an amazing typo? (@clauirizarry)

Holiday windows in NYC you won’t want to miss. (Shaye Weaver for amNewYork)

Do you need to be reminded that fishing in the Gowanus Canal, a waterway whose water was nicknamed “Black Mayo,” is a bad idea? The answer is a surprising “yes,” because the city is adding more signs reminding people of the Superfund status of the canal. (Scott Unman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s 421-a tax abatement program was meant to spur development and make home-owning less of a financial burden by temporarily lowering real estate tax bills, but that temporary financial relief is exactly that. Only temporary. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Real estate tax is tricky to begin with. On average Bronx and Staten Island homeowners have lower home values, but pay a higher percentage of the value of their homes compared to other boroughs. There are four classes of property that are all taxed differently and assessments vary. Reform is on the agenda for 2020. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

Meet Lauren Ashcraft, the 30-year-old democrat socialist challenging U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney for her seat in Congress. (Victoria Merlino for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“Jagged Little Pill” on Broadway is a Times Critic’s Pick. (Jesse Green for NY Times)

You might see headlines about how Di Fara Pizza will “deliver” its pizza for the first time. While it’s technically true, they are working with a company that ships food through the mail rather than locally. While it’s a fun gimmick to say that you can get a pizza from Di Fara “delivered” to your friend in Seattle, it’s also not the delivery you were looking for. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Who are the people clamoring for Blockbuster Video merchandise in 2019? Well, a pop-up on Soho is here for them to get their fix of a doomed business from the 90s. (Untapped New York)

The Sanitation Department have select the garbage cans of tomorrow, and they look like garbage cans. The cans of tomorrow will be seen on Fifth Ave near 90th St first before implemented more widely across the city. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

A Target is coming to Times Square and it’s expected to open in 2022. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Kellogg’s NYC near Union Square, where for some reason you could get a bowl of cereal for $1.50, is closed. Miraculously, it was open for nearly two years. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Where to ice skate in the city. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s homeless relocation program has been under investigation since February for placing families in unsafe living conditions outside city limits. Newark is suing NYC in federal court for moving homeless families into Newark slums. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The NYPD has more tasers than ever, and it seems like they’re trigger-happy to use those tasers on people of color and the “emotionally disturbed” based on four years of complaints about improper use. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Today marks the release of the third season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. What would her classic-six apartment on Riverside Drive be worth today? (Emily McDonald for StreetEasy)

The filming locations of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: The Dyker Heights Christmas lights. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An explosion at an Amtrak facility in the Bronx has left one person dead and two people with minor injuries, according to the FDNY. (Elizabeth Kim and Andy Mai for Gothamist)

Congrats to everyone who posted photos of a viral milkshake to Instagram, you’ve participated in the dumbest food trend of the decade. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Okay, so now Coffee Rat is now a thing. Great. (Ben Kayas for Gothamist)

Are there still Gambino mobsters out there? Yes, because 12 of them, including their boss Andrew Campos, were arrested on racketeering and loan sharking charges on Thursday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Are you one of the 50,000 whose late fees to the New York Public Library were referred to a collections agency? (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Take a deep breath. There have been no reported Mandarin Duck sightings in a while and some pessimists have feared the worst. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Under their new contract, bus and subway workers would get a roughly 10% raise over the next four years. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Great New Year’s Eve restaurants that don’t require a tasting menu. (The Infatuation)

The ten best unsung restaurants from the Times’ Hungry City columnist. (Ligaya Michan for NY Times)

The Briefly for August 23, 2019 – The “Can No Longer Get Away With Murder” Edition

NYC’s students are still less than 50% proficient in English and math, 15 restaurants to BYOB, Di Fara reopens, the Museum of Ice Cream find a home, and more in today’s NYC news digest

This weekend’s scheduled subway disruptions look minimal on the surface, but the 1, 2, 3 and 5 trains are still taking a big hit. (Subway Weekender)

The Times is starting to take guesses as to when the mayor finally ends his joke of a presidential bid. (NY Times)

The Museum of Ice Cream is getting a permanent home in Soho on Broadway this fall. Get your Instagram accounts ready. (Curbed)

The NYC Police Benevolent Association’s response to the Daniel Pantaleo firing, who caused the death of Eric Garner with an illegal chokehold, is to tour the city’s precincts to say that “no one has our backs,” circulating photos of James O’Neill saying he’s “wanted for killing the NYPD,” and posting in a message board for police officers called the “Law Enforcement Rant” calling Eric Garner’s family “savages” and “ghetto dwellers.” It’s like they no longer think they can get away with murder at their jobs. (Gothamist)

There used to be a bowling alley in the basement, the secret top floor bar, and more secrets of the Jane Hotel. (Untapped Cities)

Keens in Midtown is wallpapered with history, with newspaper clippings, photos, playbills, etc on display all over the steakhouse. Until recently, that history included about 10 pieces that featured racist stereotypes. Nothing will put a hamper on your night like finding out your “thumbs up” photo with your steak also featured a large “rival darkies” minstrel show ad in the background. (Eater)

A venomous snake went missing two weeks ago in the Bronx Zoo’s “Jungle World” exhibit. It’s still missing. (Bronx Times)

A man was crushed to death by an elevator in Kips Bay in an elevator that was ordered to be shut down in May by the Department of Buildings. (NY Times)

Billionaire’s Row residents tried to take the mayor up on his offer to do “anything” to rescue the Di Fara pizzeria by offering to pay Di Fara’s tax bill if the mayor would stop a homeless shelter from opening in their neighborhood. (Patch)

No need, because Di Fara reopened on Thursday afternoon. (Grub Street)

NYC student achievement is rising, but still, only 46% of the city’s third through eighth-graders passed the state’s math exam and only 47% passed the English exam. Both numbers are up from last year, but both fall short of the city’s 50% goal. (NY Times)

The 7 train continues to drop debris from its elevated tracks in Queens. This time it was a piece of metal the size of a brick that luckily avoided hitting anyone. The MTA has installed netting as part of a pilot program in some areas of the 7 train, but clearly not in enough locations. (Gothamist)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge is scheduled to open next month, four years ahead of schedule. (Sunnyside Post)

The Department of Homeless Services announced a joint operation between DHS and NYPD in an effort to offer services and not punishment to the city’s homeless on the subways. (Curbed)

Next month the MLB FoodFest brings foods from every Major League Baseball stadium to Midtown. You won’t have to go to Texas to get the dilly-dog: a hot dog stuffed inside a pickle and fried like a corn dog. (amNY)

The top 15 restaurants where you can BYOB. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 22, 2019 – The “Advertisements on Advertisements” Edition

A bloody night in Queens and Brooklyn, the mayor wants to save Di Fara, the governor invites him to pay their taxes, the best ice cream sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos: Take a look inside the Watchtower’s old headquarters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Elyse Marks is not your average restoration architect and an Instagram account full of photos repelling off of some of the city’s more well-known buildings proves it. (Untapped Cities)

What to see in the city’s art galleries right now. (NY Times)

The landmarked Long Island City Pepsi-Cola sign is now brought to you by JetBlue. (amNY)

Tuesday night was a bloody one in Queens and Brooklyn, with four unrelated shootings resulting in five homicides. Gun violence is up over 25% from last year. (Gothamist)

A report by Coalition for the Homeless shows the city’s housing plan is actually making the city’s homelessness problem worse. (Curbed)

“New Yorkers are very, very spoiled,” Mr. Toma said, seated in the driver’s seat of a black Rolls-Royce Wraith, as he waited for the club to fill. (NY Times)

Harvey Weinstein wants his rape trial moved out of New York City because of the city’s “inflammatory press coverage.” (Gothamist)

The quarter-billion-dollar overhaul of the Grand Central Shuttle has begun. (amNY)

An 11-year-old border-terrier mix and very good boy named Theo was stolen from outside a grocery store in Williamsburg on Monday night. Theo is suffering from arthritis, liver issues, tumors, and more, but one thing he won’t have to worry about is being away from home because he was reunited with his human on Wednesday. (Brooklyn Paper)

The atmosphere is “salon-like” in this “hidden gem” where women swap makeup tips and the lighting is good and there is open space. Where is this? Apparently, it’s the second-floor women’s bathroom at the Port Authority Bus Terminal. (NY Times)

The last of the pay-by-the-hour hotel to the history of the New Victory Theater, 10 seedy remnants of old Times Square you can still see today. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the ways landlords are trying to get around the new rent reform laws in order to screw you. (The Real Deal)

Legendary pizzeria Di Fara was seized by the state for owing $167k in taxes dating back to 2014. The mayor responded by saying he’s “ready to do anything I can to get them reopened.” (Grub Street)

“Now, if he wants to pay the $200,000 on behalf of the pizza place, he can do that.” -Governor Cuomo (amNY)

Mystery solved. The staff of Dean & Deluca’s says the store is so empty because they are going through a renovation, but will stay open as a coffee shop during the renovation. (Gothamist)

Lyft is partnering with GrowNYC and BMS Family Health and Wellness Centers to offer discounted rides to low-income New Yorkers in Brownsville to improve access to healthy food options at the green and farmer’s markets and Project EATS. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Andrew Herman is illustrating every Mets home game this season. (New York Cliche)

The driver whose recklessness lead to the death of cyclist Jose Alzorriz on Coney Island Avenue is facing charges of manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, vehicular assault, and reckless endangerment. Mirza Baig, 18, is one of the few drivers facing prison after killing a cyclist or pedestrian. (Streetsblog)

The city has lowered the requirements necessary to enter its affordable housing lotteries, lessening barriers that discourage undocumented immigrants from applying. (LIC Post)

There’s a GoFundMe for just about anything, including one for fired NYPD officer Daniel “Chokehold” Pantaleo. (Patch)

10 things you absolutely have to do in NYC before summer ends. (Time Out)

If you’ve ever been anywhere near Battery Park, you know the routine of ignoring the aggressive ticket sellers for trips around the Statue of Liberty. The ticket sellers are confusing at best and deceptive at worst. The city has terminated any docking permits to companies who accept tickets sold by street vendors. (Curbed)

The Fraunces Tavern, the oldest building in Manhattan, will celebrate its 300th anniversary with a party on October 1. (amNY)

The NYPD sergeant at the scene where Eric Garner was killed will not face a trial for her role in his death. Instead, Sgt. Kizzy Adonis will lose 20 vacation days. Eric Garner’s mother said the NYPD is “actively participating in an ongoing cover-up” and the police union that represents Adonis said she was “scapegoated.” (Patch)

If you go to Union Hall in Park Slope in September or October, there’s a 1/6 chance that David Cross will be performing. He’s announced 10 dates in the two months where he’ll be testing out new material on stage. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Video: Mike Chen of Strictly Dumpling takes you on a tour of his four favorite Brooklyn pizzerias. Di Fara was not on the list. (Viewing NYC)

Meet the subway’s “happiest conductor.” (Gothamist)

The mayor was a laughing stock in Iowa, but for once it wasn’t his polling numbers or debate performances. (Patch)

If you must get caught in a storm (that was me walking home from the subway last night before hosting John Trivialta at Parklife), Domino Park in Williamsburg is, at the very least, picturesque before the rain comes down. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Democrat councilman Andy King was charged by the Standards and Ethics Committee with harassment, disorderly conduct, conflict of interest violations and retaliation, from Minority Leader and Republican Steven Matteo. Specific details of the allegations were not disclosed. (amNY)

The best ice-cream sandwiches in the city, ranked. (Grub Street)