The Briefly for August 22, 2019 – The “Advertisements on Advertisements” Edition

A bloody night in Queens and Brooklyn, the mayor wants to save Di Fara, the governor invites him to pay their taxes, the best ice cream sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos: Take a look inside the Watchtower’s old headquarters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Elyse Marks is not your average restoration architect and an Instagram account full of photos repelling off of some of the city’s more well-known buildings proves it. (Untapped Cities)

What to see in the city’s art galleries right now. (NY Times)

The landmarked Long Island City Pepsi-Cola sign is now brought to you by JetBlue. (amNY)

Tuesday night was a bloody one in Queens and Brooklyn, with four unrelated shootings resulting in five homicides. Gun violence is up over 25% from last year. (Gothamist)

A report by Coalition for the Homeless shows the city’s housing plan is actually making the city’s homelessness problem worse. (Curbed)

“New Yorkers are very, very spoiled,” Mr. Toma said, seated in the driver’s seat of a black Rolls-Royce Wraith, as he waited for the club to fill. (NY Times)

Harvey Weinstein wants his rape trial moved out of New York City because of the city’s “inflammatory press coverage.” (Gothamist)

The quarter-billion-dollar overhaul of the Grand Central Shuttle has begun. (amNY)

An 11-year-old border-terrier mix and very good boy named Theo was stolen from outside a grocery store in Williamsburg on Monday night. Theo is suffering from arthritis, liver issues, tumors, and more, but one thing he won’t have to worry about is being away from home because he was reunited with his human on Wednesday. (Brooklyn Paper)

The atmosphere is “salon-like” in this “hidden gem” where women swap makeup tips and the lighting is good and there is open space. Where is this? Apparently, it’s the second-floor women’s bathroom at the Port Authority Bus Terminal. (NY Times)

The last of the pay-by-the-hour hotel to the history of the New Victory Theater, 10 seedy remnants of old Times Square you can still see today. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the ways landlords are trying to get around the new rent reform laws in order to screw you. (The Real Deal)

Legendary pizzeria Di Fara was seized by the state for owing $167k in taxes dating back to 2014. The mayor responded by saying he’s “ready to do anything I can to get them reopened.” (Grub Street)

“Now, if he wants to pay the $200,000 on behalf of the pizza place, he can do that.” -Governor Cuomo (amNY)

Mystery solved. The staff of Dean & Deluca’s says the store is so empty because they are going through a renovation, but will stay open as a coffee shop during the renovation. (Gothamist)

Lyft is partnering with GrowNYC and BMS Family Health and Wellness Centers to offer discounted rides to low-income New Yorkers in Brownsville to improve access to healthy food options at the green and farmer’s markets and Project EATS. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Andrew Herman is illustrating every Mets home game this season. (New York Cliche)

The driver whose recklessness lead to the death of cyclist Jose Alzorriz on Coney Island Avenue is facing charges of manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, vehicular assault, and reckless endangerment. Mirza Baig, 18, is one of the few drivers facing prison after killing a cyclist or pedestrian. (Streetsblog)

The city has lowered the requirements necessary to enter its affordable housing lotteries, lessening barriers that discourage undocumented immigrants from applying. (LIC Post)

There’s a GoFundMe for just about anything, including one for fired NYPD officer Daniel “Chokehold” Pantaleo. (Patch)

10 things you absolutely have to do in NYC before summer ends. (Time Out)

If you’ve ever been anywhere near Battery Park, you know the routine of ignoring the aggressive ticket sellers for trips around the Statue of Liberty. The ticket sellers are confusing at best and deceptive at worst. The city has terminated any docking permits to companies who accept tickets sold by street vendors. (Curbed)

The Fraunces Tavern, the oldest building in Manhattan, will celebrate its 300th anniversary with a party on October 1. (amNY)

The NYPD sergeant at the scene where Eric Garner was killed will not face a trial for her role in his death. Instead, Sgt. Kizzy Adonis will lose 20 vacation days. Eric Garner’s mother said the NYPD is “actively participating in an ongoing cover-up” and the police union that represents Adonis said she was “scapegoated.” (Patch)

If you go to Union Hall in Park Slope in September or October, there’s a 1/6 chance that David Cross will be performing. He’s announced 10 dates in the two months where he’ll be testing out new material on stage. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Video: Mike Chen of Strictly Dumpling takes you on a tour of his four favorite Brooklyn pizzerias. Di Fara was not on the list. (Viewing NYC)

Meet the subway’s “happiest conductor.” (Gothamist)

The mayor was a laughing stock in Iowa, but for once it wasn’t his polling numbers or debate performances. (Patch)

If you must get caught in a storm (that was me walking home from the subway last night before hosting John Trivialta at Parklife), Domino Park in Williamsburg is, at the very least, picturesque before the rain comes down. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Democrat councilman Andy King was charged by the Standards and Ethics Committee with harassment, disorderly conduct, conflict of interest violations and retaliation, from Minority Leader and Republican Steven Matteo. Specific details of the allegations were not disclosed. (amNY)

The best ice-cream sandwiches in the city, ranked. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for May 20, 2019 – The “Casting Literal and Figurative Shade” Edition

A legendary pizza place is temporarily closed, Scott Stringer is making his mayoral candidacy clear, the NYPL’s secrets, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are along the 3, 6, A, D and E lines, but double check before you go anywhere after 10pm. (Subway Weekender)

The BQE Rehab panel is asking for feedback. If you want to provide your feedback, there’s a phone number and a form for the kind of constructive, polite feedback New Yorkers are known for. (BQE Panel)

The developer of the building that would cast literal shade on the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is attempting a char offensive campaign to promote the site’s affordable housing. I’m not sure there’s a New Yorker gullible enough to believe that a company would pay $75 million for a plot of land and then build 1,500 apartments (50% would be “affordable”) because they believe in affordable housing. (Gothamist)

From the pneumatic tubes, to the book train, to the actual visible history you can see in the building, ten secrets of the NYPL’s main branch on 42nd St. (Untapped Cities)

Not on the list is the number of empty floors of stacks. There are some parts of the NYPL that can’t safely store its research collection, which has been moved into storage underneath Bryant Park, where its 11 million book collection is safe. (NY Times)

Wave hello to the city’s newest bars and restaurants. (amNY)

The restaurants ordered closed last week, including surprising inclusions Barcade on 24th and Di Fara Pizza in Midwood. (Patch)

Di Fara says it will be reopening today. (Eater)

If you need more proof that the MTA wasn’t prepared for the L Train Slowdown, the initial cuts to the M14’s route have been altered with this “final compromise.” (Curbed)

35 years after opening, Bookbook in Greenwich Village is closing. It’s not the city’s rising rents, but retirement that’s calling the owners. (NY Times)

This Gothamist piece about a protest from contractors over the proposed rent reforms takes a turn midway through, accusing real estate and landlord groups of astroturfing the hearings. (Gothamist)

630 Fifth Avenue. Quickly, what’s the nearest corner? Take off the last number and you’ve got 63. Divide it by 2 and you have 31. Add 20 because it’s over 600 and the answer is 51st St. Finding a cross street used to involve a little math. (Ephemeral New York)

The city lost 7,500 affordable apartments in 2018, but gained 11,800. There’s a catch. 80% of the new apartments’ affordability status is temporary. (The Real Deal)

Brooklyn’s bra whisperer. (NY City Lens)

The Bronx’s Tibbetts Brook was “moved” underground by Robert Moses. As a result of Robert Moses’s brilliant idea, the surrounding area floods when it rains, the flooding overwhelms the sewers and overflow has to be dumped into the Harlem River. The Parks Department has a plan to bring the brook back above ground to remedy this, but a private rail company stands in their way. (Gothamist)

If you’re unfamiliar with the Combined Sewage Overflow system, the city collects rainwater in its sewer system, and when the combination of rainwater, human waste, and whatever else on the street overload the sewer system, it dumps out in the NYC waters in 13 locations, dumping 377 million gallons of raw sewage into our waters. (Newsweek)

This is why the city closely monitors the water at the city’s beaches for sewage runoff. Beaches were on warning for 49 days in 2018 with one closure. The Swim Guide and website is also available for water condition reports. (nyc.gov and The Brooklyn Eagle)

Notify NYC now offers transit alerts. Why would you want transit alerts from the Department of Emergency Management, a city agency, instead of the MTA, a state agency, or one of the dozens of transit apps? No idea. A quick look shows that the Notify system doesn’t have the same breadth of coverage as @NYCTsubway on twitter. (amNY)

It shouldn’t be to anyone’s surprise at the width of the chasm of difference between the rezoning plans of the Department of City Planning and the Bushwick Community Plan for Bushwick’s future. (Bklyner)

Normal people put up curtains or shades in their bathrooms so people can’t watch them poop. Alex Rodriguez does not appear to be a normal person, or else this photo of A-Rod taking a deuce wouldn’t be on the internet. (Gothamist)

Morgenstern’s is adding a twist to its flagship ice cream location on Houston: booze. (Eater)

The most popular baby names in NYC are Liam, Noah, Jacob, Emma, and Olivia. Not many future kinds named Bran. (Patch)

Turns out the TWA hotel wasn’t actually as ready for visitors like it should have been. (Gothamist)

If you want to attract birds, here are the plants for you to grow. (Patch)

. Turns out the MTA is as good at maintaining its toilets as it is its subways. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard ferry stop opens today. (Brooklyn Paper)

Scott Stringer, who has clearly been making a visibility play to run for mayor, says a new tax on the city’s largest businesses could expand subsidies for childcare for 84,000 kids younger than 3. (Patch)

The best cocktails under $10. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 23, 2019 – The “DA’s Secret List of Tainted Police Officers” Edition

Someone is smashing the LinkNYC kiosks, $3,000 “affordable” apartments, Di Fara’s pizza, fighting back against the paper bag tax, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Someone is smashing LinkNYC kiosks in Chelsea. It could be someone trying to send a message to neighborhood resident Google, who basically owns them and the data they collect. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

It’s been discussed for over a dozen years, but the federal government’s Opportunity Zone program may be the catalyst that changes Willets Point forever. (The Real Deal)

Taxed to death. That’s how Queens City Councilmember Robert Holden views the city’s paper bag nickel tax when plastic bags become banned. (QNS)

The city’s DAs keep secret lists of NYPD officers who have perjured themselves in criminal prosecutions in order to avoid using them as witnesses. Civil-liberties advocates are calling for a review of past convictions based on testimony from potentially tainted officers. (Gothamist)

He’s not wrong, New York’s taxes paid per income is 12.7%, the highest in the nation and 22 of the top 25 counties paying the highest amount of taxes are in New York state. Manhattan specifically pays 2.7% of all federal income tax collected with only 0.48% of the country’s population. (Business Insider)

Say hello to the newest restaurants in the city. (amNY)

Kudos to Queens educator Danielle Hnath, who promised her students she would dye her hair blue if they raised over $8,000 for the American Heart Association. They raised $10,000. (QNS)

Technically they apply, but something doesn’t seem right about a $3,000/month apartment on Staten Island qualifying as fulfilling the mayor’s promise to create 300,000 “affordable” apartments. (The City)

The top twelve restaurants serving the underrated food of Puebla, Mexico. A very specific list. (Eater)

NYCWiN, which went down for a full week due to a Y2K-esque bug, cost the city a billion dollars. Northrup Grumman’s contract has been extended to June 2020 for $40 million. (Patch)

A look back at Five Points, not the mural space, the most notorious neighborhood in the city’s history. (StreetEasy)

The best neighborhoods for New Yorkers over 65, or the best neighborhoods for people under 65 who want to live in a very quiet apartment building. (6sqft)

A series of self-guided and thematic NYC exploration walks, created by New Yorkers. (r/NYC)

The NYPD, having solved the city’s other problems, targeted a “Race and Bake” bike ride on 4/20, showing up to arrest the organizer with printouts of his social media posts. He was arrested for an open ticket container ticket he got in 2015. (Gothamist)

How Di Fara became an NYC pizza institution. (Viewing NYC)

Inside a recycling center, from truck to 1,000 plastic bales. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city wants to expand Staten Island’s dockless bike share program, but without the entire island having a single bike lane. (Streetsblog)

The eight oldest buildings in Queens. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA, in a surprisingly logical move, is looking to add solar panels to the roofs of its train yards, bus depots, and buildings. (amNY)

Get ready to vote in a completely different way. The Charter Revision Commission’s preliminary staff report hint that the city will end the practice of costly runoff elections during primaries by adopting ranked choice voting. (The City)

Ranked choice voting, aka the alternative vote, explained. (CGP Gray)

Where to have a unique dining experience. Yeah, it’s not exactly a descriptive title for a list of restaurants, but lets’ be honest that you’ll probably click on it anyway because it’s the last link in the email and you’re probably more than a little curious, no? (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.