The Briefly for January 15, 2020 – The “New Yorkers, Known Historically for Their Patience” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Nine things New Yorkers will judge you for, adoptees can see their original birth certificates, the three remaining four star restaurants in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 52˚
Clear throughout the day.

Op-Ed: Public Advocate Jumaane Williams on how knee-jerk reactions have drowned out common sense conversation and reform when it comes to desegregating the city’s schools when it comes to the gifted and talented program. (Jumaane Williams for amNewYork Metro)

If a fire breaks out in your apartment and you flee, make sure to close the door behind you. An open door turned a one apartment fire into multi-hour ordeal that left 22 people injured in an Upper West Side high-rise. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

An off-duty Secret Service agent shot and killed a dog in Brooklyn early Tuesday morning, claiming the dog was “unleashed and aggressive,” despite photos form the scene showing a leash peeking out from under a white sheet. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The mayor is urging patience when it comes to the BQE panel report, saying last week’s leak of the report was only partial and everyone should “see the whole thing and judge when we all get to look at it.” Yes, New York City is known for its patience and ability to wait before jumping to a conclusion. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

Next month McNally Jackson is set to open a new store in CityPoint in Downtown Brooklyn. (Craig Hubert for Brownstoner)

A guerrilla art installation using decommissioned railroad corridor in Queens is meant to question the ongoing cycle of building, abandonment and redevelopment looming over the city. Railroad Eraser by Aaron Asis highlights the unused corridor with white paint on the tracks. While temporary, it’ll be there until the area is redeveloped. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Stop eating sad salads. How to game the salad bar at lunch, from 11 hefts and food writers. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Nine things New Yorkers will judge tourists for and nine things they won’t. Wearing flip-flops and eating bagels at Dunkin making the “judging” list, as I’m pretty sure they are both classified as misdemeanors in Manhattan. (Mary Lane for New York Cliche)

Prospect Park’s Concert Grove Pavilion is getting a $2 million renovation. The pavilion was designed by Calvert Vaux, one of the park’s original architects, and has been roped off from the public since 2014 due to structural issues. Along with the renovation, the “Oriental Pavilion” is likely to be renamed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Starting today, adoptees in the state who are over 18 can request their previously sealed original birth certificates. The law was passed by the state’s legislature and signed in November, making New York the 10th state with unrestricted access to birth certificates. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The city is sending a 24-person team to Puerto Rico to assist in the relief efforts following almost 2,000 earthquakes since December 28. The team heading down are building inspectors, engineers, emergency managers, and mental health professionals. The governor also sent a team and personally went to survey the damage as well. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A tale of two diners (and a competitive review) in Clinton Hill. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A man walked into a Sunday mass in Brooklyn and doused the priest and altar with bright red juice. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Liquiteria, which claimed to be the city’s first cold-pressed juice bar, closed all five NYC locations abruptly and have all but disappeared online. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Bronx saw the highest wage jump in the state from the second quarter of 2018 to second quarter of 2019 with a 5.7% increase. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics report doesn’t indicate a reason, but the state’s minimum wage increases probably have something to do with it. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s newest celebrity is the Staten Island Bus Raccoon, who tried to jump aboard an S44 bus and being thwarted by some closed doors. The NYPD relocated the raccoon. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Turn back the clock with 20 photos of the city form the 1920s. (Lucie Levine for 6sqft)

The MTA is taking issue with the report that says 4/5 commutes in 2019 we’re delayed due to signal issues. They’ve not refuted the data, instead saying “the devil is in the details.” Technically, 78% of commutes delayed isn improvement from 2018’s 92%. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Six New York City corrections officers were arrested on Tuesday in connection to a drug-smuggling ring on Rikers Island. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Is it the year of glowing seesaws? The city’s second set of glowing seesaws have been set up next to Pier 17, each making unique sounds. The seesaws will be at Pier 17 through March. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

What’s the oldest bar in Brooklyn? It’s a complicated answer. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Perhaps inspired by yesterday’s Mama’s Too meatball parm news, Robert Sietsema has declared where you can find his favorite meatball parm in the city at Faicco’s Italian Specialties•. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Rockefeller Center may be headed for a renovation, depending if owner Tichman Speyer can get approval from the landmarks commission. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

How New York became Gotham City from Joker‘s production designer Mark Friedberg. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The cottage where Edgar Allan Poe wrote “Annabel Lee” and “The Bells” is in the Bronx. The Edgar Allan Poe Cottage was built in 1812 and is at 2640 Grand Concourse, where Poe lived in 1846 with his wife and mother-in-law. (Ariel Kates for GVSHP)

A book that Anthony Bourdain was working on before his death with co-author Laurie Woolever will be published on October 13. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Congress approved a measure last month to reinstate two-way tolls on the Verrazzano, but the MTA has announced no set date for the change to happen. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The City owns most of the land adjacent to the Coney Island boardwalk and leases it to Zamperla, who operates Luna Park and leases to shops and places to eat on the boardwalk like Lola Star, Nathan’s, Ruby’s, Tom’s Restaurant, and the Coney Island Beach Shop. Zamperla is trying to raise rents between 50 and 400% for the independent businesses. When the Times attempted to reach Zamperla officials for comment, they were vacationing in Italy. (Aaron Randle for NY Times)

The water main that played havoc with the Upper Wets Side and Monday morning’s subway commutes was 98 years old. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Ahead of his anticipated Hall of Fame induction, two Bronx City Councilmembers are introducing legislation to rename East 161st Street as “Jeter Street.” (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Pete Wells from the Times knocked Sushi Nakazawa from four stars to three, leaving only three restaurants in the city with four stars, Jean-Georges, Le Bernardin, and Eleven Madison Park. (Sara Boinsteel for NY Times)

Brooklyn’s best ramen restaurants. (Julien Levy for Thrillist)

The Briefly for November 8, 2019 – The “The Subway Psychic and El Bloombito Returns!” Weekend Edition

A push to lift the street vendor cap, the end of the food hall gold rush, the pumpkin smasher arrested, the Rockefeller Center tree is on its way, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Just as your schedule is really getting busy, here comes a weekend of heavy subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Finding Keano, New York’s most elusive subway psychic. (NY Times)

Monday is Veterans Day, here is what will be closed as a result of either the holiday or the Fifth Avenue parade. (Patch)

The return of El Bloombito!!! (@ElBloombito)

Have you ever heard Mayor Bloomberg try to speak Spanish? Then you’ll understand why Rachel Figueroa-Levin’s Twitter parody account exists. (Salon)

Mayor Bloomberg’s possible announcement that he will be joining the Democratic presidential candidates can mean one thing. (Patch)

5 NYC buildings that changed American history. (NY Times)

There are an estimated 20,000 food and non-food street vendors in the city, but the number of permits has been capped at 5,100 since the 1980s. State Senator Jessica Ramos wants to bring the city’s rules about street vendors into the 21st century. Her bill would lift the cap but also enforce the rules and permitting on everyone and allow municipalities to decide where vendors could and couldn’t set up shop. (Gothamist)

Five reasons to lift the street vendor cap. (Grub Street)

Apartment Porn: Twelve bathrooms, an indoor pool, eleven thousand square feet, a glass elevator, six floors, a theater, glassed garage, and the former home of Lady Gaga. All yours for $18 million. (StreetEasy)

Going deep with Jacqueline Novak on the success and bringing her show ‘Get On Your Knees’ back to Off-Broadway. (Gothamist)

Bumper. Cars. On. Ice. (amNewYork)

Photos: Inside Flushing’s Hindu temple, completed in 1977, which possibly makes it the first in the country. (Gothamist)

Saturday marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Here is where you can see pieces of the wall in the city. (6sqft)

You can either go to FAO Schwarz, or you can book the $3,000/night suite at the Conrad New York Midtown, which is filled with FAO Schwarz toys where you can order toy room service and get a private shopping tour of the store. (6sqft)

Where to eat or order Thanksgiving dinner in NYC. (Grub Street)

The idiot who jumped into the lion’s enclosure at the Bronx Zoo was arrested on Wednesday night. Myah Autry faces two charges of criminal trespass and turned herself in. (Patch)

If the Hot Duck has taught us anything, it’s that bird watching in the city is cool again. Photos of the hawks on Governors Island. (Laura Goggin Photography)

“Brutal” and “uncomfortable to watch.” Tina: The Tina Turner Musical is not getting the highest of praise. (amNewYork)

The Bay Ridge pumpkin smasher has been arrested. He was pulled over for a tail light and the NYPD allegedly also found cocaine in his car. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The National Transportation Safety Board issued a series of recommendations to increase bike safety in the US, but the only one people are focusing on is mandatory helmets. A mandatory helmet law would effectively kill all bike sharing programs in the city, but the mayor would rather tell all cyclists to wear helmets than fix the roads to make them safer for everyone. (Gothamist)

Earlier in the week I poked fun at how many food halls are opening across the city, but there are some early indicators that the “gold rush” over food halls is ending. (Eater)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree is cut and on its way to the city. It should be arriving on a flatbed on Saturday. (Untapped New York)

10 NYC residential buildings with the best amenities for dogs. (6sqft)

The Met Gala theme for 2020 is conceptual at best and straight up confusing at worst. About Time: Fashion and Duration? Yup. (Gothamist)

The court battle over control of WBAI is ongoing but the station has returned local programming to the airwaves. (Patch)

The sudden appearance of an armored ICE vehicle on a residential street sparked panic in Ridgewood on Thursday. Turns out it wasn’t a random immigration arrest, but part of a federal investigation into someone hoarding about 50 guns including a machine gun, gun parts, and ammunition. (Gothamist)

Another dunk on Trump from Attorney General Letitia James and New York state. This time around the president was hit with a $2 million penalty for persistently using the Trump foundation for illegal activity. (Patch)

Take a look inside the last occupied apartments inside the Chelsea Hotel. (NY Times)

As winter creeps towards us every year, the same feeling of dread overcomes the city as it tightens its muscles in fear and anticipation. SantaCon is coming. Steer clear on December 14th. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s best diner breakfasts, according to the staff of the Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Photos: BRIC After Dark at the Knockdown Center. (The Briefly)

The Briefly for July 17, 2019 – The “At This Point, Why Not Wait for Christmas?” Edition

CitiBike’s expansion, the best happy hours, the most expensive neighborhood, the government will not bring a case against Daniel Pantaleo, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

New York City had a monorail, if only for a moment. Visitors to the 1964 World’s Fair were able to see the grounds in a 4000 foot looped monorail that was disassembled when the fair closed. Support pylons can still be seen in the ground in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. (Untapped Cities)

Who are Jeff Bezos’s new neighbors? Let’s find out. There’s a list at the end of the article if you want to skip down to it. (The Real Deal)

We have a winner, a Christmas tree being thrown out on July 16. (EV Grieve)

48 people were arrested while blocking traffic at 5th Ave and 42nd on Tuesday while protesting President Trump’s continued threat of ICE raids. (amNY)

Just finished anoter re-watch of Seinfeld and looking for a meal? If you want that classic diner experience, Queens is your borough. (QNS)

If you’ve wanted to take an up-close look at one of Tom Fruin’s Kolonihavehus glass mosaic water towers that are dotted around the city, one is on display inside The Shops at Hudson Yards. (Untapped Cities)

ConEd is celebrating turning the power back on in Manhattan with a victory tour of telling the public “sometimes blackouts happen in heatwaves.” Very reassuring. (6sqft)

The federal government will not bring charges for Daniel Pantaleo over the death of Eric Garner. NYPD Commissioner is the arbiter of Pantaleo’s disciplinary trial, which the police administrative judge has not yet rendered a verdict. “The D.O.J. has failed us,” -Mr. Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr (NY Times)

The Department of Transportation’s “Safer Cycling” report in 2017 identified eight priority zones with insufficient bike infrastructure and deadly crashes. Since these areas were identified, the number of injuries in the priority zones have risen by 6.5%. (Streetsblog)

The driver of a box truck hit a cyclist in Park Slope on Fifth Avenue. The cyclist was either unconscious or unresponsive before being taken to Methodist hospital. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look into why drivers and pedestrians seem to hate bicyclists. (Gothamist)

CitiBike officially unveiled their plans for expansion into the Bronx Ridgewood, Upper Manhattan, and deeper into Brooklyn. It’ll be a while for some neighborhoods with the expansion scheduled through 2023. (6sqft)

We The Commuters is celebrating Bike Week with a list of biking clubs across the city where the intimidation factor is low and the “we won’t leave you behind” factor is high. (Gothamist)

The play-on-words named Dig Inn has decided to change its name to questionable and no longer punny Dig. They argue “Dig has become more than a restaurant,” to which I argue “restaurants have table service.” (@diginn on Medium)

What to do in a power outage. These are practical tips, this isn’t a guide to entertain yourself. (StreetEasy)

Levain Bakery added a “secret” ice cream sandwich menu item, so if you’re looking to impress your friends who aren’t subscribers to The Briefly, this is your moment. (Gothamist)

A list of the dates where the L train is shut down overnights at ten stations throughout Brooklyn in July, August, September, October, and January. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for six weekends of partial to non-service as switches are replaced. (Curbed)

“My mother at Lincoln Towers at 69th and West End has no power also.” The New York Times published their Slack transcripts from the night of the blackout, because why not? (NY Times)

A farewell to Dean & Deluca. (Grub Street)

Giselle Burgess, the founder of the first troop designed for homeless girls in NYC Girl Scout Troop 6000, was elected to the board of directors of The Child Center of NY. (QNS)

As expected, two real estate trade groups have brought a constitutional challenge against the state’s rent reforms. Historically the Supreme Court has uphelf rent regulations. (NY Times)

Tribeca remains #1 in the city when it comes to home prices, with the median sale price in Q2 of 2019 being $4.34 million. The only neighborhood that comes close is Hudson Yards with $3.86 million. (6sqft)

Williamsburg has the more cases of the measles than any other neighborhood, but the list is 9 neighborhoods long and the total measles count rose by 1 in July to 623. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Tips for eating out in NYC with food allergies. (amNY)

The city’s “Nostalgia Ride” which goes from 96th St to Coney Island along the Q line in a 1917 BMT train will happen this Saturday. Be patient, the ride takes about two hours. (amNY)

Waitress will close on Broadway in January of 2020. (NY Times)

How much trash is on our beaches? Well, Parley for Oceans, the Department of Sanitations official non-profit group, with 170 volunteers picked up 1,200 pounds of trash from Rockaway Beach in two hours. (Gothamist)

The top happy hours in 25 neighborhoods. (Thrillist)

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