The Briefly for July 14, 2020 – The “Like Noise Canceling for Your Open Windows” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: All politics is beans, the NYPD protects a Blue Lives Matter rally, marriage can wait (it has to), the Mets have a possible buyer, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

10 things you must know about NYC before moving here. It’s probably too late for all of you. Do you know these things? #1 is “It’s expensive,” so you probably know that one. (Localize.City)

Shake Shack gave its PPP loan back. Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group fired 2,000 of its 2,300 employees in March and used different LLCs to apply and receive loans between $11.4 million and $27 million. (Matthew Schuerman with research by Jake Dobkin and Megan Zerez for Gothamist)

It’s not ready for purchase, but researchers in Singapore have developed an early version of noise canceling headphones for your apartment windows. (David Waldstein for NY Times)

Goya is at the center of politics in 2020, a statement no one saw coming, from Republican Nicole Malliotakis’s Goya canned food drive to AOC publishing an Adobo recipe. This is all because the CEO of Goya said the USA is “truly blessed” to have a leader like President Trump. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

The White Horse Tavern, which openly flaunted the state’s social distancing guidelines, had its liquor license temporarily suspended. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Looking for a break from everyday life? Six unique NYC Airbnbs. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Looking to get married in the city? You’re gonna have to wait. Appointments to get a license using the city’s “Project Cupid” site has a backlog that stretches on for months. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Davell Gardner, a 1-year-old boy, was shot dead at a BBQ in Bed-Stuy at the Raymond Bush playground on Sunday night. Three other people were shot, but are expected to survive. (NY1)

If C.K. McWhorter’s $1.8 billion bid to buy the Mets goes through, he would become the only black owner in Major League Baseball. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Trigg Brown — the chef and co-owner of one of NYC’s most buzzed-about restaurants, Win Son — is temporarily stepping away from day-to-day operations after employees leveled allegations that he fostered a hostile workplace. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Black Lives Matter mural outside of Trump Tower was already defaced. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Sunday on the beach at Coney Island was a great example of a failure to socially distance. In a neighborhood without Open Streets or many parks, the beach is the only viable place to gather outdoors. (Ariama C. Long for Kings County Politics)

Say hello to Chi Ossé, an activist running for City Council in the 36th District and the youngest candidate to ever run for City Council. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

36 members of the City Council are calling on Joe Borelli, a City Councilmember from Staten Island, to apologize after his obviously racist attack on the celebration. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

It seems the city has finally rid itself of a noted homophobe and City Councilmember Rubén Díaz Sr., whose Congressional bid was met with a responding “NOPE.” Díaz Sr. won’t be seeking office after his term is up in 2021. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal is dropping out of the race for Comptroller in 2021, blaming her dropping out on the coronavirus pandemic. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance hasn’t announced if he’ll be seeking another term in office, but his list of challengers is growing. Despite making recent headlines with cases against President Trump and Harvey Weinstein, Vance’s office has garnered a lot of well-earned criticism for how it’s handled abuse cases against the rich and famous. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

The five candidates vying for Vance’s job will participate in a forum today, essentially the race’s first debate, without Vance. (Andrew Millman for Gotham Gazette)

All travelers flying into airports in New York state will now have to fill out a form providing contact and itinerary information or face a $2,000 fine. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Strand’s new Upper West Side location opens on Wednesday, but rather than hiring more staff, the book store has fired a dozen of their recently rehired staffers. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYPD traffic agent Jeanisidor Jean Baptiste was arrested in Brooklyn after an investigation uncovered years of alleged sexual abuse to a five-year-old girl from 2008 through 2012. The victim is now 17. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

If the NYPD is called on to keep the peace during rival Black Lives Matter and Blue Lives Matter protests, who do you think they’ll defend? On Sunday in Bay Ridge, the NYPD made two arrests after Blue Lives Matter protesters attacked the Black Lives Matter protesters. Both men arrested were Black. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Sex workers joined together outside of the Stonewall Inn on July 9 to rally against police brutality and send a message that sex work is work. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

A new bill is calling for a ban of the NYPD’s use of drones for recording or collecting data on the general public in open spaces. The bill also restricts the use of drones without a warrant and bans facial recognition, and is sponsored by State Senator Jessica Ramos. (NY1)

It was a few days of good news about Covid-19 infections in New York, so it’s time to tamp that down a bit. There’s a new spike in infections in New Yorkers in their 20s. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

It’s nice to think that the city really had zero Covid-19 deaths on Saturday, but that’s probably not true. The way the city assigns death dates means that we won’t actually know for a few days. Over the last week, there have been 12 confirmed Covid-19 deaths, and one probable death each day. (Jen Carlson and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Schools can reopen in the fall for regions in phase four and have infection rates below 5%, according to the guidelines set forward by Governor Cuomo. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

It’s not all good news for schools. If the city’s infection rate surges past 9% later in August or after the school year starts, schools will be forced to close. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

For months following Amazon’s decision to pull out, we felt forgotten and it appeared that our goal of creating a Long Island City waterfront that would empower our community and create a significant number of jobs was lost. Then last year, a new process emerged.
-Carol Wilkins, April Simpson-Taylor, Claudia Coger & Annie Cotton-Morris, NYCHA Tenant Leaders: Where Amazon Never Arrived, New Opportunity Arises for Gotham Gazette

6 Manhattan homes with their own private pools and hot tubs. Must be nice. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

It was only a matter of time. A driver crashed his car into an outdoor dining area on Roosevelt Ave in Queens. Four diners and a server were injured. (Justine Re for NY1)

16 places to pick up food news Prospect Park has a few good gems, even if a few of them are laughably far away and other picks ignore where the park’s entrances are. (Nikko Duren & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Micah Eames for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 15, 2020 – The “New Yorkers, Known Historically for Their Patience” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Nine things New Yorkers will judge you for, adoptees can see their original birth certificates, the three remaining four star restaurants in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 52˚
Clear throughout the day.

Op-Ed: Public Advocate Jumaane Williams on how knee-jerk reactions have drowned out common sense conversation and reform when it comes to desegregating the city’s schools when it comes to the gifted and talented program. (Jumaane Williams for amNewYork Metro)

If a fire breaks out in your apartment and you flee, make sure to close the door behind you. An open door turned a one apartment fire into multi-hour ordeal that left 22 people injured in an Upper West Side high-rise. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

An off-duty Secret Service agent shot and killed a dog in Brooklyn early Tuesday morning, claiming the dog was “unleashed and aggressive,” despite photos form the scene showing a leash peeking out from under a white sheet. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The mayor is urging patience when it comes to the BQE panel report, saying last week’s leak of the report was only partial and everyone should “see the whole thing and judge when we all get to look at it.” Yes, New York City is known for its patience and ability to wait before jumping to a conclusion. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

Next month McNally Jackson is set to open a new store in CityPoint in Downtown Brooklyn. (Craig Hubert for Brownstoner)

A guerrilla art installation using decommissioned railroad corridor in Queens is meant to question the ongoing cycle of building, abandonment and redevelopment looming over the city. Railroad Eraser by Aaron Asis highlights the unused corridor with white paint on the tracks. While temporary, it’ll be there until the area is redeveloped. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Stop eating sad salads. How to game the salad bar at lunch, from 11 hefts and food writers. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Nine things New Yorkers will judge tourists for and nine things they won’t. Wearing flip-flops and eating bagels at Dunkin making the “judging” list, as I’m pretty sure they are both classified as misdemeanors in Manhattan. (Mary Lane for New York Cliche)

Prospect Park’s Concert Grove Pavilion is getting a $2 million renovation. The pavilion was designed by Calvert Vaux, one of the park’s original architects, and has been roped off from the public since 2014 due to structural issues. Along with the renovation, the “Oriental Pavilion” is likely to be renamed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Starting today, adoptees in the state who are over 18 can request their previously sealed original birth certificates. The law was passed by the state’s legislature and signed in November, making New York the 10th state with unrestricted access to birth certificates. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The city is sending a 24-person team to Puerto Rico to assist in the relief efforts following almost 2,000 earthquakes since December 28. The team heading down are building inspectors, engineers, emergency managers, and mental health professionals. The governor also sent a team and personally went to survey the damage as well. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A tale of two diners (and a competitive review) in Clinton Hill. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A man walked into a Sunday mass in Brooklyn and doused the priest and altar with bright red juice. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Liquiteria, which claimed to be the city’s first cold-pressed juice bar, closed all five NYC locations abruptly and have all but disappeared online. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Bronx saw the highest wage jump in the state from the second quarter of 2018 to second quarter of 2019 with a 5.7% increase. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics report doesn’t indicate a reason, but the state’s minimum wage increases probably have something to do with it. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s newest celebrity is the Staten Island Bus Raccoon, who tried to jump aboard an S44 bus and being thwarted by some closed doors. The NYPD relocated the raccoon. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Turn back the clock with 20 photos of the city form the 1920s. (Lucie Levine for 6sqft)

The MTA is taking issue with the report that says 4/5 commutes in 2019 we’re delayed due to signal issues. They’ve not refuted the data, instead saying “the devil is in the details.” Technically, 78% of commutes delayed isn improvement from 2018’s 92%. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Six New York City corrections officers were arrested on Tuesday in connection to a drug-smuggling ring on Rikers Island. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Is it the year of glowing seesaws? The city’s second set of glowing seesaws have been set up next to Pier 17, each making unique sounds. The seesaws will be at Pier 17 through March. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

What’s the oldest bar in Brooklyn? It’s a complicated answer. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Perhaps inspired by yesterday’s Mama’s Too meatball parm news, Robert Sietsema has declared where you can find his favorite meatball parm in the city at Faicco’s Italian Specialties•. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Rockefeller Center may be headed for a renovation, depending if owner Tichman Speyer can get approval from the landmarks commission. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

How New York became Gotham City from Joker‘s production designer Mark Friedberg. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The cottage where Edgar Allan Poe wrote “Annabel Lee” and “The Bells” is in the Bronx. The Edgar Allan Poe Cottage was built in 1812 and is at 2640 Grand Concourse, where Poe lived in 1846 with his wife and mother-in-law. (Ariel Kates for GVSHP)

A book that Anthony Bourdain was working on before his death with co-author Laurie Woolever will be published on October 13. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Congress approved a measure last month to reinstate two-way tolls on the Verrazzano, but the MTA has announced no set date for the change to happen. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The City owns most of the land adjacent to the Coney Island boardwalk and leases it to Zamperla, who operates Luna Park and leases to shops and places to eat on the boardwalk like Lola Star, Nathan’s, Ruby’s, Tom’s Restaurant, and the Coney Island Beach Shop. Zamperla is trying to raise rents between 50 and 400% for the independent businesses. When the Times attempted to reach Zamperla officials for comment, they were vacationing in Italy. (Aaron Randle for NY Times)

The water main that played havoc with the Upper Wets Side and Monday morning’s subway commutes was 98 years old. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Ahead of his anticipated Hall of Fame induction, two Bronx City Councilmembers are introducing legislation to rename East 161st Street as “Jeter Street.” (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Pete Wells from the Times knocked Sushi Nakazawa from four stars to three, leaving only three restaurants in the city with four stars, Jean-Georges, Le Bernardin, and Eleven Madison Park. (Sara Boinsteel for NY Times)

Brooklyn’s best ramen restaurants. (Julien Levy for Thrillist)

The Briefly for November 8, 2019 – The “The Subway Psychic and El Bloombito Returns!” Weekend Edition

A push to lift the street vendor cap, the end of the food hall gold rush, the pumpkin smasher arrested, the Rockefeller Center tree is on its way, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Just as your schedule is really getting busy, here comes a weekend of heavy subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Finding Keano, New York’s most elusive subway psychic. (NY Times)

Monday is Veterans Day, here is what will be closed as a result of either the holiday or the Fifth Avenue parade. (Patch)

The return of El Bloombito!!! (@ElBloombito)

Have you ever heard Mayor Bloomberg try to speak Spanish? Then you’ll understand why Rachel Figueroa-Levin’s Twitter parody account exists. (Salon)

Mayor Bloomberg’s possible announcement that he will be joining the Democratic presidential candidates can mean one thing. (Patch)

5 NYC buildings that changed American history. (NY Times)

There are an estimated 20,000 food and non-food street vendors in the city, but the number of permits has been capped at 5,100 since the 1980s. State Senator Jessica Ramos wants to bring the city’s rules about street vendors into the 21st century. Her bill would lift the cap but also enforce the rules and permitting on everyone and allow municipalities to decide where vendors could and couldn’t set up shop. (Gothamist)

Five reasons to lift the street vendor cap. (Grub Street)

Apartment Porn: Twelve bathrooms, an indoor pool, eleven thousand square feet, a glass elevator, six floors, a theater, glassed garage, and the former home of Lady Gaga. All yours for $18 million. (StreetEasy)

Going deep with Jacqueline Novak on the success and bringing her show ‘Get On Your Knees’ back to Off-Broadway. (Gothamist)

Bumper. Cars. On. Ice. (amNewYork)

Photos: Inside Flushing’s Hindu temple, completed in 1977, which possibly makes it the first in the country. (Gothamist)

Saturday marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Here is where you can see pieces of the wall in the city. (6sqft)

You can either go to FAO Schwarz, or you can book the $3,000/night suite at the Conrad New York Midtown, which is filled with FAO Schwarz toys where you can order toy room service and get a private shopping tour of the store. (6sqft)

Where to eat or order Thanksgiving dinner in NYC. (Grub Street)

The idiot who jumped into the lion’s enclosure at the Bronx Zoo was arrested on Wednesday night. Myah Autry faces two charges of criminal trespass and turned herself in. (Patch)

If the Hot Duck has taught us anything, it’s that bird watching in the city is cool again. Photos of the hawks on Governors Island. (Laura Goggin Photography)

“Brutal” and “uncomfortable to watch.” Tina: The Tina Turner Musical is not getting the highest of praise. (amNewYork)

The Bay Ridge pumpkin smasher has been arrested. He was pulled over for a tail light and the NYPD allegedly also found cocaine in his car. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The National Transportation Safety Board issued a series of recommendations to increase bike safety in the US, but the only one people are focusing on is mandatory helmets. A mandatory helmet law would effectively kill all bike sharing programs in the city, but the mayor would rather tell all cyclists to wear helmets than fix the roads to make them safer for everyone. (Gothamist)

Earlier in the week I poked fun at how many food halls are opening across the city, but there are some early indicators that the “gold rush” over food halls is ending. (Eater)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree is cut and on its way to the city. It should be arriving on a flatbed on Saturday. (Untapped New York)

10 NYC residential buildings with the best amenities for dogs. (6sqft)

The Met Gala theme for 2020 is conceptual at best and straight up confusing at worst. About Time: Fashion and Duration? Yup. (Gothamist)

The court battle over control of WBAI is ongoing but the station has returned local programming to the airwaves. (Patch)

The sudden appearance of an armored ICE vehicle on a residential street sparked panic in Ridgewood on Thursday. Turns out it wasn’t a random immigration arrest, but part of a federal investigation into someone hoarding about 50 guns including a machine gun, gun parts, and ammunition. (Gothamist)

Another dunk on Trump from Attorney General Letitia James and New York state. This time around the president was hit with a $2 million penalty for persistently using the Trump foundation for illegal activity. (Patch)

Take a look inside the last occupied apartments inside the Chelsea Hotel. (NY Times)

As winter creeps towards us every year, the same feeling of dread overcomes the city as it tightens its muscles in fear and anticipation. SantaCon is coming. Steer clear on December 14th. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s best diner breakfasts, according to the staff of the Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Photos: BRIC After Dark at the Knockdown Center. (The Briefly)