The Briefly for July 31, 2019 – The “Getting Paid Not to Show Up to Work” Edition

Triple-digit heat in subway stations, the MTA is accused of discrimination, de Blasio denies the Brownsville shooting was a “mass shooting,” dine-in movie theaters, and more in today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Balance your anger with hope and vision appears to be the message from Danny Harris, the new executive director of Transportation Alternatives, the largest advocacy group for better bicycling, walking, and public transit. In an interview with Streetsblog, he comes across more pragmatist than angry bike guy yelling at people on the Brooklyn Bridge. (Streetsblog)

Could hackers bring the city’s streets to a halt? Yes, and here’s how according to the journal Physical Review. (Patch)

Queens Community Board 2 rejected a plan to add 100 apartments to the development that replaced 5Pointz in Long Island City. (Curbed)

A state audit proved what every New Yorker already assumed: the MTA’s projects are plagued by overruns. Contractors were paid and sometimes didn’t show up, design problems lead to delays, and nearly everything costs more than budgeted. (Curbed)

Can brand-new bar with a wine selection and a $6 Miller High Life be considered a dive? (Grub Street)

A tribute to Arcade Bakery, “one of New York’s best bakeries hiding in plain sight,” which closes its doors for good on August 2. (Grub Street)

A town hall centered on rent laws has the potential to be contentious enough before a bunch of anti-vaccination idiots decide to commandeer the room. (The Villager)

Denizens of Coney Island are protesting one of two options for a city ferry dock in an attempt to preserve a fishing area. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A preview of the Gansevoort Peninsula, a 5.5-acre space and the future home of Manhattan’s first public beach. (The Villager)

Was the shooting in Brownsville a mass shooting? According to the mayor and failing presidential hopeful, no. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling for more anti-violence funding and not more police after last weekend’s shooting in Brownsville. As he put it, “If police could solve the problem, it would be solved already.” (Gothamist)

Video: Who preserves the MoMA’s vintage electronic art? Meet television repairman Chi-Tien Lui. (Viewing NYC)

When the NY Times suggests going to the East River for “the freshest fish,” you should note Pete Wells is reviewing The Fulton and not suggesting catching and eating your lunch. (NY Times)

Is this marker in Woodside, Queens really the center of NYC? (6sqft)

A new mural in NoMad pays tribute to Evelyn Nesbit, aka “The Gilded Lady,” an actor, model, and New Yorkers whose life would be considered scandalous today, let alone in the early 1900s. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA is facing claims that three of its agents discriminated against a black woman wearing a hijab earlier this year. (amNY)

The person who doored Em Samolewicz, the act that lead to her death, was given a summons for $133, but the truck driver who hit and killed her remains uncharged. (Streetsblog)

Let that Kubrick obsessed friend of yours know that a comprehensive 2001: A Space Odyssey exhibit is coming to the Museum Of The Moving Image. (Gothamist)

When a pool and gym isn’t enough, luxury buildings are turning towards amenities like private IMAX screens, Turkish baths, a wine tasting room, and private driveways. (StreetEasy)

It’s not uncommon for a subway station to hit triple digits in the summer. (Viewing NYC)

The Global Citizen Festival announced its 2019 lineup with Queen + Adam Lambert, Alicia Keys, and Carole King among the headliners. Unlike OZY Fest, a festival in Central Park in late September has a low chance of being canceled due to heat. (BrooklynVegan)

G train operator Eric Boyo saved a woman’s life by pulling the emergency brake while pulling into the Fulton Street station after discovering a woman was on the tracks. (amNY)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is taking its advocacy fight against a proposed building complex with a new exhibit called “Fight for Sunlight.” (amNY)

The New York City Community Garden Coalition is protesting the city’s new four-year agreements citing overly restrictive rules and regulations. As a result, less than half of the city’s 550 gardens have signed leases. (amNY)

A look at the new technologies that the MTA will be piloting. Most of the startups are focused on attempting to make eventual failures and crowding easier to anticipate and communicate. (Curbed)

Governor Cuomo tried to hide the real reason the former MTA chairman Joseph Lhota quit last November. The real reason was the state’s ethics watchdog determined he couldn’t do his job and avoid conflicts of interest with his work outside the MTA. (amNY)

A definitive guide to the city’s dine-in movie theaters. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for July 22, 2019 – The “A Neighborhood Watch to Protect Against the Government” Edition

Another heatwave and another weekend of failures from ConEd, Friday’s subway glitch, good places for martinis, how to get a bike lane, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subways are looking pretty bleak this week. The 2 and 3 are borked, the 7 isn’t running in Manhattan, the L isn’t servicing most of Brooklyn, and the rest isn’t great either. (Subway Weekender)

Friday’s subway “glitch” that suspended the shuttle and every numbered train except the 7 was caused by a problem that was previously flagged and has been causing hundreds of delays since June. The MTA lost the ability to see where the trains were in their system and shut down every affected line. (amNY)

Photos of New Yorkers who dared face and possibly beat the heat. (NY Times)

Inside the neighborhood watch against ICE in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd was ready to provide “safe and reliable service through the weekend.” (amNY)

After a weekend of punishing weather, it looks like we’re headed towards highs in the 80s this week. Perfect weather for John Trivialta at Parklife this Wednesday! (amNY)

ConEd’s took a dump this weekend, with multiple outages across the city due to the heat. (NY Times)

This was before ConEd cut power to 30,000 in Brooklyn in order to make heat-related repairs. In an attempt to assist ConEd, Governor Cuomo sent state troopers, generators and light towers to the affected neighborhoods. The governor is also widening the investigation into last weekend’s power outage to include this weekend’s outages as well. (amNY)

A Times reporter decided to start delivering burritos for a story and, get this, he found out that it’s a demanding job! (NY Times)

Back in March Anthony Comello shot “Franky Boy” Cali in Staten Island. In court, his lawyer says he was trying to help the president by arresting him for being part of the “deep state.” (NY Times)

Video: Meet Andrew Cote, president of the New York Beekeepers Association. (Viewing NYC)

New York hasn’t changed much over the years, and this aerial photo from 1931 shows it. (r/newyorkcity)

Landlord Zev Pollak is being sued for telling African-Americans that he maintains a “Jewish building” in Midwood. According to the lawsuit, Zev Pollak’s “blatant and repeated conduct in violation of this fundamental American principle of equality is shocking and must end.” (The Real Deal)

The newest cheap-snack-turned-expensive-appetizer craze in the city is the french onion dip. (Eater)

Is Whole Foods overcharging for weight differences in their pre-packaged foods? According to a judge, the answer is no. (Gothamist)

Where did all that water come from that flooded a subway station in Queens on Wednesday of last week? Blame the Skyline Tower construction site. (6sqft)

Russian Doll was nominated for 13 Emmy awards, and in celebration of the nominations and the coming second season, take a look at some of the filming locations of the first season. (Untapped Cities)

You never know what you’ll find at a house clearance sale. Archivists found CDs with 2,400 photos of the aftermath of 9/11, taken by what is assumed to be a construction worker. The photographer hasn’t been identified, but all the photos have been uploaded to Flickr. If you are sensitive to photos from 9/11, avoid this link. (BBC)

International Lou Reed Tai Chi Day is being celebrated at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch on August 3. This isn’t a random choice, Lou Reed practiced Tai Chi for over three decades. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Lyft added subway directions to its app in an arms race with Uber to be the one transit app to rule them all. (Engadget)

End the “what’s a drive-in?” conversations with a trip to “Drive-In Movies at the Mount,” a pop-up drive-in in Staten Island on Friday nights. The fare is more family-friendly than horror, terror, and monsters. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you forget that the city is full of animals, other times you see a hawk in McCarren park eating a rodent. (Greenpointers)

Did you take a dip in a city fountain this weekend? It’s not illegal! At one point, the fountain in Washington Square Park was a pool.

DEA agents uncovered a heroin mill in the Bronx with over $5 million of heroin seized. Three people were arrested. (Patch)

Drinking gin and going down a slide. Carefully. (Time Out)

Want to learn more about the city’s history? Here are some great book picks from reporters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s how to get a bike lane in your neighborhood. (Gothamist)

A February fire in the Metropolitan Detention Center caused a blackout during one of the coldest points of the year. This weekend, another fire caused panic inside the federal jail. (Gothamist)

When the Barclays Center was conceived, the developers promised 400 indoor parking spaces for bikes. A decade later that promise is officially broken. (Streetsblog)

227 Duffield Street in Downtown Brooklyn is an unassuming structure, but there are hints that it was once a part of the Underground Railroad, but no concrete proof. Politicians and advocates are calling on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate the location as a landmark as a way around a demolition permit granted by the city. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want a good martini. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to @munnybuns for today’s photo!

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for July 19, 2019 – The “It’s Called the Urban Heat Island Effect” Edition

The mayor wasted $220 million, ConEd keeps blacking out, an AriZona Iced Tea pop-up shop ends arrests, the best brunch spots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Portions of the R, L, 1, 5, and N trains are out this weekend, the 3 is out completely and more “fun” in this weekend’s planned subway disruptions and diversions. (Subway Weekender)

The story of Preserved Fish, the man. (Untapped Cities)

If it seems like the city heats up like an oven, you’d be right. The concrete absorbs heat, the glass reflects it, and the lack of open space prevents the heat from dissipating. It’s called the “Urban Heat Island Effect.” (Gothamist)

Quickly, what borough has the highest number of home listings with pools? Turns out it’s the Bronx. (Localize Labs)

This is the stupidest thing I’ve ever heard of, and I wanna be the best at it,” a firsthand account of the ecstasy and the agony of the Brooklyn Air Guitar Championships. (Hard Noise)

In 2015, the mayor spent $220 million to ensure that 5,000 apartments in Stuy Town would remain rent-regulated until at least 2035. When the state passed rent reforms, it made that $220 million irrelevant. (Gothamist)

If you’re on the 1, 2, or 3 lines, you’re gonna get hit with some major subway disruptions for the next month and a half of weekends. (6sqft)

“You’re the mayor. Use your authority. Because nothing has changed.” Protests outside city hall and police headquarters called for justice five years after the death of Eric Garner. (Gothamist)

State Assemblymember Helen Rosenthal wants to end New York state school incubator projects for good. It’s not uncommon for ducks to be dumped in city parks where they are defenseless and wildlife rehabilitators spend time to find, feed, and care for the domesticated ducks that can’t survive on their own. (I Love the Upper West Side)

ConEd’s failures continue as blackouts continue to be a problem in portions of the city. Manhole fires caused outages in Maspeth, Elmhurst, Sunset Park, Borough Park, Flushing, parts of the Bronx, and the Upper West Side (again). ConEd blames the manhole fires on the heat, they also blame manhole fires on the cold when it’s cold. (Gothamist)

American Idol is coming to Greenpoint for auditions on July 23, so get ready to watch a bunch of New Yorkers embarrass themselves on television soon. (Brooklyn Paper)

Video: Think about the nightmare of standing on a subway platform looking at the tracks when suddenly a construction wall gives out behind you, sending a flood of water towards you, knocking you off your feet headed towards the tracks. That was the reality at the Court Square-23rd Street subway station on Wednesday night. (Gothamist)

8 things you may not know about the American Museum of Natural History. (6sqft)

AriZona Iced Tea tried to sell 99 cent Adidas shoes at a pop-up shop on the Bowery on Thursday morning. It ended with two assaults, arrests, and the NYPD shutting the whole event down. (Eater)

10 must-see art shows to help beat the heat. (NY Times)

A brief guide to bike etiquette. (Gothamist)

What’s going on in Sunset Park? A second body was found in the waters off Sunset Park in two days. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Lower East Siders don’t argue that their neighborhood needs protection from flooding, but the loudest among them don’t appear to want that protection if it means having to live without the East River Park for three and a half years. (Gothamist)

El Chapo has been taken to an “undisclosed location,” which means he’s finally out of New York City’s hair/a>. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio’s calls for “due process” when comes to the Eric Garner case are a part of a pattern the mayor executes to avoid taking a stand on controversial issues that arises as a result of potential police misconduct. (The Indypendent)

Everyone be on the lookout for this jerk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

What is it about the Brooklyn Youth Chorus that has attracted artists like Beyoncé Elton John, Alicia Keys, Grizzly Bear, and more to collaborate with them? (NY Times)

There are only 24 recognized professional air hockey players in the world. The New York Air Hockey Club is always looking for the next great players. (NY Times)

New York doesn’t discriminate when it comes to what stores get tagged by graffiti artists. Welcome to Ludlow Street, Louis Vuitton. (Bowery Boogie)

The New York City Triathalon has been canceled as a result of the heatwave, scheduled to take place on the city’s first 100-degree day in seven years. (Patch)

“Beautiful,” the Carole King Broadway musical is closing at the end of October after six years and grossing a quarter billion dollars. (NY Times)

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is back in the city filming season 3. (West Side Rag)

Enter Sandman. This Sunday New York Yankee’s closer Mariano Rivera will be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. (amNY)

A new state law prohibits race discrimination based on hair or hairstyles. (The Root)

9 places to enjoy a delicious brunch in the city. (NY Times)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.