The Briefly for February 18, 2020 – The “Decapitating a Luxury Condo” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city tries to control the private garbage industry, the best happy hours in 31 neighborhoods, Staten Island makes an untrusted cop list, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 49˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

In appreciation of mosaic subway station signs. (Ephemeral New York)

Photos: A tour of NYC’s oldest library, once used by George Washington. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Off with its head, literally. The Department of Buildings is being ordered to revoke the permits for an indeterminate amount of floors from a luxury condo on the Upper West Side. Amazingly, the developer will have to demolish potentially 20 floors of the 55-story building. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The NYPD has always insisted that it’s facial recognition database is only checked against mugshots, but there is some evidence that points to photos from social media being used to assist in creating matches for suspects. This wouldn’t be the first time the NYPD lied about their facial recognition database. (Mike Hayes for HuffPost)

Prosecutors in Staten Island are building an internal list of NYPD officers who they will not allow to testify in court because they can’t be trusted to testify honestly. Seems like if they an’t be trusted to tell the truth in court, there might be issues trusting them to honestly uphold the law? (George Joseph for Gothamist)

It started with a white picket fence and quickly escalated to racial discrimination in Flushing. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

It took 125 years, but the lions outside the NYPL are finally reading thanks to some very large books. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Newkirk Plaza is America’s oldest outdoor shopping plaza, and it seems no one wants to be responsible for it. The city and MTA have discussed who is responsible for management, funding and safety without a conclusion, mirroring most disagreements between the state and city. If neither step up, maybe the growing rat population will start cleaning the place up. (Katie Herchenroeder for Bklyner)

New ethics violations charges have been filed against Andy King, who finished the punishment for his last ethics violation charges less than three months ago. This time around it’s disorderly induct and conflict-of-interest violations by using public funds for personal benefit. This happened while a court-appointed monitor was watching over King’s actions. The city council voted to not expel King 34-12 back in October. Maybe they’ll change their tune this time. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

If you’ve ever been walking through the city late at night, you’ve watched private garbage trucks blow through red lights without slowing down or drive the wrong way on one way streets. Between 2016 and 1018 privately owned garbage trucks were involved in 73 series accidents. A new law is looking to control the private garbage industry over the next three years, which picks up half of the city’s garbage. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

After half a century, a legendary pool hall in Bay Ridge, Hall of Fame Billiards, is closing. (Kimon de Green for Bedford + Bowery)

Here are the four people running for City Councilmember Rafael Espinal’s seat after he abruptly quit his job representing Cypress Hills, Bushwick, East New York, and Brownsville. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum continues to unravel after the forced resignation of director Caroline Baumann, with five trustees resigning in protest. (Robin Pogrebin for NY Times)

LGBTQ groups have once again been rejected from participating in the Staten Island St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 1. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

What’s the difference between co-ops and condos and what the heck is a condop? (Localize.City)

Reminder: If you see a hawk, don’t go close to it. It’s likely hunting and you’re ruining its potential meal. (Laura Goggin)

A ban on brokers fees will benefit tenants in the long run to the tune of $7,000 on average in the first year, and that includes a rent hike. (Beth Dedman for amNewYork Metro)

The best happy hours in 31 neighborhoods. (Rachel Pelz for Thrillist)

The Briefly for December 17, 2019 – The “End Fare Evasion by Ending Fares” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Pasta cake, the City Council looks to work around the governor, the most beautiful homes of 2019, a buy/rent calculator, mulchfest approaches, and more

Today – Low: 29˚ High: 36˚
Light rain until evening.

The best & worst of SantaCon 2019. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

SantaCon’s aftermath was predictably awful. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Despite being illegal for a decade, discrimination against people with Section 8 vouchers persists. (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

A well laid out plan to cut fare evasion to zero: make public transit free. (The Independent)

The City Council could circumvent the governor in making electric bikes legal. Councilmember Rafael Espinal is pushing forward with his bill that would legalize the bikes and cap their speeds at 20 mph. The governor has a bill on his desk since June that would legalize them. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

This year’s legislative session was, in Governor Cuomo’s words, the “most productive legislative session in modern history” thanks to truly Democratic control. There’s been one major bottleneck in getting those bills into law: the governor himself. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

The NYCHA is the city’s worst landlord for the second year running, topping Public Advocate Jumaane Williams’s list of the worst landlords in the city. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Does it make more sense to buy or rent? Depends how long you’re gonna stay in your apartment. In Canarsie the time is under two years, but in the Lower East Side, it’s thirty. Don’t worry, there’s a calculator. (Ameena Walker for Curbed)

A look at Brooklyn’s first public bike parking hub, the confusingly named Oonee Pod. While it’s only 20 bike racks, it’s a start. (Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Eagle)

14th St’s buses will be going all-electric in March. The busway’s improved service has meant a ridership increase of nearly 25% over last year at this time. Turns out people will take the bus if it’s reliable. Who knew? (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

If you can’t fight the addictiveness of old photos of New York City, the archive of photographs from Carole Teller from the 60s through the 90s is enthralling. (Dawson Knick for GVSHP)

Who can fight the charm of Billy On The Street with Mariah Carey? (@billyeichner)

Four first responders who died from 9/11-related illnesses were posthumously awarded Bronze Medallions from Mayor de Blasio on Monday for advocacy work that ensured fellow responders will receive medical care throughout their lifetimes. Nineteen people were honored, including Jon Stewart. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Apartment Porn: The most beautiful homes of 2019. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

In one of the most classless moves of the year, Ed Mullins, president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association, is using the death of Tessa Majors to baselessly claim she was in the park where she was murdered to buy drugs and criticize the change in the city’s marijuana enforcement laws. (Ja’han Jones for HuffPost)

New York’s law allowing undocumented immigrants to obtain licenses went into effect on Monday and there were lines. (Tracey Tully and Michael Gold for NY Times)

A look back at a full decade of the rent being too damn high across the city. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

You know who thinks the MTA is doing great? The MTA. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A wholly acceptable “Why I’m leaving New York” essay. (Joan Summers for Jezebel)

Here are the stories of the 28 bicyclists who were killed on city streets by drivers. 2019 is the bloodiest year since 2000 for cyclist deaths. (Emma Whitford for Gothamist)

Pasta cake? (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Say farewell to Tootsie, Oklahoma!, and Waitress as seven Broadway shows are coming to a close in January. (Matt Windman for Gothamist)

Just in case you were wondering if Harvey Weinstein wasn’t a Scooby Doo-level villain, his recent interview where he calls himself a “pioneer” in providing opportunities for female actors and directors and that he is a “forgotten man” will clarify that issue for you. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

MetroCard scammers cost the MTA about $40 million a year. These aren’t turnstile jumpers, but people intentionally breaking machines or disguising themselves as an MTA employee and asking for a dollar to walk through the emergency exits, or one of the dozens of other ways people have thought of to outsmart the MTA. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

“All the current administration cares about is getting to the day where they can have a press release saying that we’re not at an all time high [of homelessness].” Former City Council Speaker Christine Quinn is now the CEO of a nonprofit that is the largest provider of shelter and supportive housing and has some things to say about how the city treats its homeless. (Ben Max and Stephen Wyer for Gotham Gazette)

When Veronica Vanterpool resigns from the MTA’s board, it will leave the city severely underrepresented. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

It’s not even Christmas, but here comes the signs for Mulchfest. (EV Grieve)

It’s like a greatest hits record, but for NYC restaurants. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 31, 2019 – The “Getting Paid Not to Show Up to Work” Edition

Triple-digit heat in subway stations, the MTA is accused of discrimination, de Blasio denies the Brownsville shooting was a “mass shooting,” dine-in movie theaters, and more in today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Balance your anger with hope and vision appears to be the message from Danny Harris, the new executive director of Transportation Alternatives, the largest advocacy group for better bicycling, walking, and public transit. In an interview with Streetsblog, he comes across more pragmatist than angry bike guy yelling at people on the Brooklyn Bridge. (Streetsblog)

Could hackers bring the city’s streets to a halt? Yes, and here’s how according to the journal Physical Review. (Patch)

Queens Community Board 2 rejected a plan to add 100 apartments to the development that replaced 5Pointz in Long Island City. (Curbed)

A state audit proved what every New Yorker already assumed: the MTA’s projects are plagued by overruns. Contractors were paid and sometimes didn’t show up, design problems lead to delays, and nearly everything costs more than budgeted. (Curbed)

Can brand-new bar with a wine selection and a $6 Miller High Life be considered a dive? (Grub Street)

A tribute to Arcade Bakery, “one of New York’s best bakeries hiding in plain sight,” which closes its doors for good on August 2. (Grub Street)

A town hall centered on rent laws has the potential to be contentious enough before a bunch of anti-vaccination idiots decide to commandeer the room. (The Villager)

Denizens of Coney Island are protesting one of two options for a city ferry dock in an attempt to preserve a fishing area. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A preview of the Gansevoort Peninsula, a 5.5-acre space and the future home of Manhattan’s first public beach. (The Villager)

Was the shooting in Brownsville a mass shooting? According to the mayor and failing presidential hopeful, no. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling for more anti-violence funding and not more police after last weekend’s shooting in Brownsville. As he put it, “If police could solve the problem, it would be solved already.” (Gothamist)

Video: Who preserves the MoMA’s vintage electronic art? Meet television repairman Chi-Tien Lui. (Viewing NYC)

When the NY Times suggests going to the East River for “the freshest fish,” you should note Pete Wells is reviewing The Fulton and not suggesting catching and eating your lunch. (NY Times)

Is this marker in Woodside, Queens really the center of NYC? (6sqft)

A new mural in NoMad pays tribute to Evelyn Nesbit, aka “The Gilded Lady,” an actor, model, and New Yorkers whose life would be considered scandalous today, let alone in the early 1900s. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA is facing claims that three of its agents discriminated against a black woman wearing a hijab earlier this year. (amNY)

The person who doored Em Samolewicz, the act that lead to her death, was given a summons for $133, but the truck driver who hit and killed her remains uncharged. (Streetsblog)

Let that Kubrick obsessed friend of yours know that a comprehensive 2001: A Space Odyssey exhibit is coming to the Museum Of The Moving Image. (Gothamist)

When a pool and gym isn’t enough, luxury buildings are turning towards amenities like private IMAX screens, Turkish baths, a wine tasting room, and private driveways. (StreetEasy)

It’s not uncommon for a subway station to hit triple digits in the summer. (Viewing NYC)

The Global Citizen Festival announced its 2019 lineup with Queen + Adam Lambert, Alicia Keys, and Carole King among the headliners. Unlike OZY Fest, a festival in Central Park in late September has a low chance of being canceled due to heat. (BrooklynVegan)

G train operator Eric Boyo saved a woman’s life by pulling the emergency brake while pulling into the Fulton Street station after discovering a woman was on the tracks. (amNY)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is taking its advocacy fight against a proposed building complex with a new exhibit called “Fight for Sunlight.” (amNY)

The New York City Community Garden Coalition is protesting the city’s new four-year agreements citing overly restrictive rules and regulations. As a result, less than half of the city’s 550 gardens have signed leases. (amNY)

A look at the new technologies that the MTA will be piloting. Most of the startups are focused on attempting to make eventual failures and crowding easier to anticipate and communicate. (Curbed)

Governor Cuomo tried to hide the real reason the former MTA chairman Joseph Lhota quit last November. The real reason was the state’s ethics watchdog determined he couldn’t do his job and avoid conflicts of interest with his work outside the MTA. (amNY)

A definitive guide to the city’s dine-in movie theaters. (Eater)

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