The Briefly for April 21, 2020 – The “Mayor de Blasio Wants You to Snitch” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: All public events in June are canceled, the best Indian takeout and delivery options, the NY Times discovers studio apartments in quarantine and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 62˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

A pilot program to bring on-site health services and expanded COVID-19 testing to residents of NYCHA will roll out this week, according to Governor Cuomo. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The country’s most expensive sushi restaurant now has a takeout option to match. Masa is selling an $800 box of sushi or sashimi every Friday. It will feed four people and you have to assemble it yourself. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio wants you to snitch on your fellow New Yorkers for not socially distancing. “I’m sorry this is not snitching.” -Mayor de Blasio. On a serious note, report people or plaes that are promoting something that is creating an unsafe condition. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The mayor may not have the authority to close the schools or make rulings over the subways, but he does have the ability to cancel public events and Mayor de Blasio has canceled all public events in June. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The New York City LGBTQ Pride March: Canceled. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Shakespeare in the Park: Canceled. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Half Marathon: Canceled. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival: Canceled. Is this going to be a year without festivals in NYC? (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Coney Island Mermaid Parade: Postponed. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The federal government’s $350 billion funding for small businesses ran out last week, calling attention to larger businesses that received checks, like Shake Shack’s $10 million. Shake Shack announced it would be giving that $10 million back after public outrage was pointed in their direction. (Zachary Warmbrodt for Politico)

Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, described as the third-best steakhouse in every second-tier city in America, has 150 locations, $86 million in cash reserves, and also received a forgivable $20 million loan from the federal government, making sure businesses who need those loans will never get them. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

How do you demolish a 52-story building in Manhattan? Very slowly. 270 Park Avenue’s 707-foot-tall building is being demolished to make way for a massive 1,425-foot-tall building. (Michael Young for New York YIMBY)

The NYC Human Rights Commission is launching a team to respond to COVID-19 discrimination and harassment, as reports of racism against Asians surge in the city. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The NYPD’s statistics are being criticized because a new hate crime category titled “Other Corona” hides the increase in biased-based attacked on the Asian community in New York. Multiple groups have stepped up to collect reports of harassment and racist incidents. (Ese Olumhense, Rachel Holliday Smith, Ann Choi and Christine Chung for The City)

It’s the size of a football and for $20, it can full of a mixed drink and yours with a straw. A refill is only $15. (EV Grieve)

The city opened five new COVID-19 “walk-in” test centers that will prioritize patients older than 65 with preexisting medical conditions who live in areas of the city that have been disproportionately affected by the spread of coronavirus. “Walk in” is in quotes because it’s not a drive-through test center. You still need an appointment to get a test. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Imagine the indignity of the choices that the 1% have to make in these very trying times. They have to choose between quarantining with their household staff or, get this, doing their own chores. (Dennis Lynch for The Real Deal)

Are you real for virtual dating? (Alyson Krueger for NY Times)

Where to get Indian delivery and takeout. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

If your neighbor tests positive for COVID-19, does your landlord have to tell you? There’s nothing that legally compels them to. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

I don’t think the New York that we left will be back for some years.”- Gregg Bishop, commissioner of the city’s small businesses agency. Thank you for your optimism Gregg. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

The Times looks at New Yorkers self-isolating in studio apartments, including a couple paying $2,300 for a 237 square foot studio apartment. (Penelope Green for NY Times)

Welcome to New York Sabrina Ionesco, the first overall pick in the WNBA draft, who will be playing for the Liberty. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Food critic Ryan Sutton’s 15 favorite takeout and delivery options (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Thanks to reader Xan for today’s featured photo of “Invisible Man: A Memorial to Ralph Ellison”.

The Briefly for February 18, 2020 – The “Decapitating a Luxury Condo” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city tries to control the private garbage industry, the best happy hours in 31 neighborhoods, Staten Island makes an untrusted cop list, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 49˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

In appreciation of mosaic subway station signs. (Ephemeral New York)

Photos: A tour of NYC’s oldest library, once used by George Washington. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Off with its head, literally. The Department of Buildings is being ordered to revoke the permits for an indeterminate amount of floors from a luxury condo on the Upper West Side. Amazingly, the developer will have to demolish potentially 20 floors of the 55-story building. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The NYPD has always insisted that it’s facial recognition database is only checked against mugshots, but there is some evidence that points to photos from social media being used to assist in creating matches for suspects. This wouldn’t be the first time the NYPD lied about their facial recognition database. (Mike Hayes for HuffPost)

Prosecutors in Staten Island are building an internal list of NYPD officers who they will not allow to testify in court because they can’t be trusted to testify honestly. Seems like if they an’t be trusted to tell the truth in court, there might be issues trusting them to honestly uphold the law? (George Joseph for Gothamist)

It started with a white picket fence and quickly escalated to racial discrimination in Flushing. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

It took 125 years, but the lions outside the NYPL are finally reading thanks to some very large books. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Newkirk Plaza is America’s oldest outdoor shopping plaza, and it seems no one wants to be responsible for it. The city and MTA have discussed who is responsible for management, funding and safety without a conclusion, mirroring most disagreements between the state and city. If neither step up, maybe the growing rat population will start cleaning the place up. (Katie Herchenroeder for Bklyner)

New ethics violations charges have been filed against Andy King, who finished the punishment for his last ethics violation charges less than three months ago. This time around it’s disorderly induct and conflict-of-interest violations by using public funds for personal benefit. This happened while a court-appointed monitor was watching over King’s actions. The city council voted to not expel King 34-12 back in October. Maybe they’ll change their tune this time. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

If you’ve ever been walking through the city late at night, you’ve watched private garbage trucks blow through red lights without slowing down or drive the wrong way on one way streets. Between 2016 and 1018 privately owned garbage trucks were involved in 73 series accidents. A new law is looking to control the private garbage industry over the next three years, which picks up half of the city’s garbage. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

After half a century, a legendary pool hall in Bay Ridge, Hall of Fame Billiards, is closing. (Kimon de Green for Bedford + Bowery)

Here are the four people running for City Councilmember Rafael Espinal’s seat after he abruptly quit his job representing Cypress Hills, Bushwick, East New York, and Brownsville. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum continues to unravel after the forced resignation of director Caroline Baumann, with five trustees resigning in protest. (Robin Pogrebin for NY Times)

LGBTQ groups have once again been rejected from participating in the Staten Island St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 1. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

What’s the difference between co-ops and condos and what the heck is a condop? (Localize.City)

Reminder: If you see a hawk, don’t go close to it. It’s likely hunting and you’re ruining its potential meal. (Laura Goggin)

A ban on brokers fees will benefit tenants in the long run to the tune of $7,000 on average in the first year, and that includes a rent hike. (Beth Dedman for amNewYork Metro)

The best happy hours in 31 neighborhoods. (Rachel Pelz for Thrillist)

The Briefly for December 17, 2019 – The “End Fare Evasion by Ending Fares” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Pasta cake, the City Council looks to work around the governor, the most beautiful homes of 2019, a buy/rent calculator, mulchfest approaches, and more

Today – Low: 29˚ High: 36˚
Light rain until evening.

The best & worst of SantaCon 2019. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

SantaCon’s aftermath was predictably awful. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Despite being illegal for a decade, discrimination against people with Section 8 vouchers persists. (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

A well laid out plan to cut fare evasion to zero: make public transit free. (The Independent)

The City Council could circumvent the governor in making electric bikes legal. Councilmember Rafael Espinal is pushing forward with his bill that would legalize the bikes and cap their speeds at 20 mph. The governor has a bill on his desk since June that would legalize them. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

This year’s legislative session was, in Governor Cuomo’s words, the “most productive legislative session in modern history” thanks to truly Democratic control. There’s been one major bottleneck in getting those bills into law: the governor himself. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

The NYCHA is the city’s worst landlord for the second year running, topping Public Advocate Jumaane Williams’s list of the worst landlords in the city. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Does it make more sense to buy or rent? Depends how long you’re gonna stay in your apartment. In Canarsie the time is under two years, but in the Lower East Side, it’s thirty. Don’t worry, there’s a calculator. (Ameena Walker for Curbed)

A look at Brooklyn’s first public bike parking hub, the confusingly named Oonee Pod. While it’s only 20 bike racks, it’s a start. (Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Eagle)

14th St’s buses will be going all-electric in March. The busway’s improved service has meant a ridership increase of nearly 25% over last year at this time. Turns out people will take the bus if it’s reliable. Who knew? (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

If you can’t fight the addictiveness of old photos of New York City, the archive of photographs from Carole Teller from the 60s through the 90s is enthralling. (Dawson Knick for GVSHP)

Who can fight the charm of Billy On The Street with Mariah Carey? (@billyeichner)

Four first responders who died from 9/11-related illnesses were posthumously awarded Bronze Medallions from Mayor de Blasio on Monday for advocacy work that ensured fellow responders will receive medical care throughout their lifetimes. Nineteen people were honored, including Jon Stewart. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Apartment Porn: The most beautiful homes of 2019. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

In one of the most classless moves of the year, Ed Mullins, president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association, is using the death of Tessa Majors to baselessly claim she was in the park where she was murdered to buy drugs and criticize the change in the city’s marijuana enforcement laws. (Ja’han Jones for HuffPost)

New York’s law allowing undocumented immigrants to obtain licenses went into effect on Monday and there were lines. (Tracey Tully and Michael Gold for NY Times)

A look back at a full decade of the rent being too damn high across the city. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

You know who thinks the MTA is doing great? The MTA. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A wholly acceptable “Why I’m leaving New York” essay. (Joan Summers for Jezebel)

Here are the stories of the 28 bicyclists who were killed on city streets by drivers. 2019 is the bloodiest year since 2000 for cyclist deaths. (Emma Whitford for Gothamist)

Pasta cake? (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Say farewell to Tootsie, Oklahoma!, and Waitress as seven Broadway shows are coming to a close in January. (Matt Windman for Gothamist)

Just in case you were wondering if Harvey Weinstein wasn’t a Scooby Doo-level villain, his recent interview where he calls himself a “pioneer” in providing opportunities for female actors and directors and that he is a “forgotten man” will clarify that issue for you. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

MetroCard scammers cost the MTA about $40 million a year. These aren’t turnstile jumpers, but people intentionally breaking machines or disguising themselves as an MTA employee and asking for a dollar to walk through the emergency exits, or one of the dozens of other ways people have thought of to outsmart the MTA. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

“All the current administration cares about is getting to the day where they can have a press release saying that we’re not at an all time high [of homelessness].” Former City Council Speaker Christine Quinn is now the CEO of a nonprofit that is the largest provider of shelter and supportive housing and has some things to say about how the city treats its homeless. (Ben Max and Stephen Wyer for Gotham Gazette)

When Veronica Vanterpool resigns from the MTA’s board, it will leave the city severely underrepresented. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

It’s not even Christmas, but here comes the signs for Mulchfest. (EV Grieve)

It’s like a greatest hits record, but for NYC restaurants. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!