The Briefly for July 22, 2020 – The “$400 Million Extra in Overtime” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A guide to Governors Island, the state’s legislature sets an agenda for its summer session, where to heat outside in the East Village, and more

Today – Low: 78˚ High: 88˚
Possible rain in the evening.

What to expect when you’re expecting the state legislature’s summer session to start soon. In focus will be nursing homes, automatic voter registration, redistricting, contract tracing privacy, and more. (Ross Barkan for Gothamist)

Following the June 23 primary and election, State Assemblymember Jeffrey Dinowitz is pushing legislation that would extend the state’s relaxed absentee voting rules until January 2022, which is the earliest the state’s constitution could be amended. (Norwood News)

What’s open, what’s closed, what to eat, and what to wear (a mask). A guide to Government Island. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A Queens man claimed NYPD officers beat him, twice Tased him, and yanked out one of his dreadlocks, according to a federal police brutality lawsuit. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD pledged to cut overtime by $335 million in an attempt to cut its budget by $1 billion. Instead, they are predicted to overspend on overtime by $400 million by the Independent Budget Office. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Our absentee voting mess is giving the White House ammo against main-in voting. Great. (Daniel Marans for HuffPost)

12 ways to picnic in Tompkins Square Park. (Rob Patronite for Grub Street)

New York Attorney General Letitia James along with 23 other Democratic attorney generals are suing the Trump administration to stop a new rule that removes non-discrimination protections against LGBTQ people when it comes to health care and health insurance, which is set to take effect in mid-August. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for QNS)

The latest Black Lives Matter / Blue Lives Matter protest clash happened in Marine Park in Brooklyn, but this time there were words exchanged without violence. (amNewYork Metro)

Photos: The new take-out only Smorgasburg. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A woman was found floating in the East River on Monday night with no signs of trauma on her body. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Jonathan Rodriguez was the second person arrested in connection with the death of Richard Hamlet, whose body was discovered wrapped in plastic atop a Bronx McDonald’s last week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

If it didn’t fully set in the other day, the F train will be shutting down on nights and weekends for eight months starting in August. Ruining subway reliability? Now THAT is how we start feeling normal again. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Is it possible that the Mets’ deal with Jed Lowrie is the worst in the franchise’s history? The Mets started paying him $20 million a year last year, he’s made eight plate appearances, was injured for the rest of the season and is already on the injured list. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

In an attempt to “resolve problems outside the court system,” Mayor de Blasio announced a mediation project for the city to work with landlords and tenants. Renters will receive legal assistance and advice to negotiate with landlords. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

After 21 years, radical bookstore, cafe, and activist center Bluestockings is looking for a new home. The bookstore is being pushed from the location by their landlord’s demands for higher rent. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Interview: Storm King Art Center’s Director of Facilities Mike Seaman on what it takes to maintain Storm King year round, keeping it a beautiful place that everyone is already tired of seeing your photos of on Instagram. (Luna Shyr for Atlas Obscura)

The closing Fairway grocery stores in Red Hook and Douglaston, Queens will become Food Bazaar stores. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Rooftop Films is back to create a summer movie drive-in theater in Flushing Meadows Park. It started on Friday night with John Lewis: Good Trouble, which was a few hours before the news of Lewis’s beath became public. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

Interview: Melba’s restaurant’s Melba Wilson on the future of NYC restaurants. (James Ramsay for Gothamist)

M.I.A. and Brik Bar in Astoria and Maspeth Pizza House in Maspeth have all had their liquor licenses revoked. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden will reopen on August 7. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Meet Street Riders NYC, the mobile protest movement with over 60,000 among its ranks. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Wear your damn mask on the subway. That’s the message of the MTA’s Mask Force, an arm of “Operation Respect.” (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Upper East Side for Black Lives Matter has held 50 consecutive nights of vigils in Charles Schurz Park. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Black Tap is selling its Instagram-ready milkshakes to-go for the first time. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

I don’t know a single person who would say that the COVID-19 pandemic has been easy to get through, but as a disabled New Yorker, it came with extra challenges and stressors. Politicians talked about the importance of protecting the elderly but failed to mention disabled people as if we didn’t exist. Do you know what it’s like to be erased during a pandemic?
-Michele Kaplan, disability rights advocate, Disability and dignity in the age of COVID-19 for amNewyork Metro

From Tuesday to Saturday from 12-4 pm and 5-9 pm at Lincoln Center until August 1, Lincoln Center will be playing music in the Josie Robertson Plaza, the initiative is being called Sounds of Lincoln Center. (Mike Mishkin for I Love The Upper West Side)

Riders are up on the city’s buses, but speeds are down. New York City is healing herself. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Someone is using Republican Assemblymember and congressional candidate Nicole Malliotakis’s name to talk shit about the mayor and governor on flyers in Bay Ridge. Malliotakis says someone is trying to defame her by putting up the flyers. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Councilmember Donovan Richards won the Queens borough president primary and will go on to the general election in November to likely become the first Black man elected to the office. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

Interview: Joycelyn Taylor, candidate for NYC mayor is 2021.(Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

Photos: As the summer heat cooks the city, the city is no longer just living through the pandemic, we’re living with it. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Where to eat outside in the East Village. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo from a recent Bowery walk!

The Briefly for April 21, 2020 – The “Mayor de Blasio Wants You to Snitch” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: All public events in June are canceled, the best Indian takeout and delivery options, the NY Times discovers studio apartments in quarantine and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 62˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

A pilot program to bring on-site health services and expanded COVID-19 testing to residents of NYCHA will roll out this week, according to Governor Cuomo. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The country’s most expensive sushi restaurant now has a takeout option to match. Masa is selling an $800 box of sushi or sashimi every Friday. It will feed four people and you have to assemble it yourself. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio wants you to snitch on your fellow New Yorkers for not socially distancing. “I’m sorry this is not snitching.” -Mayor de Blasio. On a serious note, report people or plaes that are promoting something that is creating an unsafe condition. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The mayor may not have the authority to close the schools or make rulings over the subways, but he does have the ability to cancel public events and Mayor de Blasio has canceled all public events in June. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The New York City LGBTQ Pride March: Canceled. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Shakespeare in the Park: Canceled. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Half Marathon: Canceled. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival: Canceled. Is this going to be a year without festivals in NYC? (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Coney Island Mermaid Parade: Postponed. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The federal government’s $350 billion funding for small businesses ran out last week, calling attention to larger businesses that received checks, like Shake Shack’s $10 million. Shake Shack announced it would be giving that $10 million back after public outrage was pointed in their direction. (Zachary Warmbrodt for Politico)

Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, described as the third-best steakhouse in every second-tier city in America, has 150 locations, $86 million in cash reserves, and also received a forgivable $20 million loan from the federal government, making sure businesses who need those loans will never get them. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

How do you demolish a 52-story building in Manhattan? Very slowly. 270 Park Avenue’s 707-foot-tall building is being demolished to make way for a massive 1,425-foot-tall building. (Michael Young for New York YIMBY)

The NYC Human Rights Commission is launching a team to respond to COVID-19 discrimination and harassment, as reports of racism against Asians surge in the city. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The NYPD’s statistics are being criticized because a new hate crime category titled “Other Corona” hides the increase in biased-based attacked on the Asian community in New York. Multiple groups have stepped up to collect reports of harassment and racist incidents. (Ese Olumhense, Rachel Holliday Smith, Ann Choi and Christine Chung for The City)

It’s the size of a football and for $20, it can full of a mixed drink and yours with a straw. A refill is only $15. (EV Grieve)

The city opened five new COVID-19 “walk-in” test centers that will prioritize patients older than 65 with preexisting medical conditions who live in areas of the city that have been disproportionately affected by the spread of coronavirus. “Walk in” is in quotes because it’s not a drive-through test center. You still need an appointment to get a test. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Imagine the indignity of the choices that the 1% have to make in these very trying times. They have to choose between quarantining with their household staff or, get this, doing their own chores. (Dennis Lynch for The Real Deal)

Are you real for virtual dating? (Alyson Krueger for NY Times)

Where to get Indian delivery and takeout. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

If your neighbor tests positive for COVID-19, does your landlord have to tell you? There’s nothing that legally compels them to. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

I don’t think the New York that we left will be back for some years.”- Gregg Bishop, commissioner of the city’s small businesses agency. Thank you for your optimism Gregg. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

The Times looks at New Yorkers self-isolating in studio apartments, including a couple paying $2,300 for a 237 square foot studio apartment. (Penelope Green for NY Times)

Welcome to New York Sabrina Ionesco, the first overall pick in the WNBA draft, who will be playing for the Liberty. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Food critic Ryan Sutton’s 15 favorite takeout and delivery options (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Thanks to reader Xan for today’s featured photo of “Invisible Man: A Memorial to Ralph Ellison”.

The Briefly for February 18, 2020 – The “Decapitating a Luxury Condo” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city tries to control the private garbage industry, the best happy hours in 31 neighborhoods, Staten Island makes an untrusted cop list, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 49˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

In appreciation of mosaic subway station signs. (Ephemeral New York)

Photos: A tour of NYC’s oldest library, once used by George Washington. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Off with its head, literally. The Department of Buildings is being ordered to revoke the permits for an indeterminate amount of floors from a luxury condo on the Upper West Side. Amazingly, the developer will have to demolish potentially 20 floors of the 55-story building. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The NYPD has always insisted that it’s facial recognition database is only checked against mugshots, but there is some evidence that points to photos from social media being used to assist in creating matches for suspects. This wouldn’t be the first time the NYPD lied about their facial recognition database. (Mike Hayes for HuffPost)

Prosecutors in Staten Island are building an internal list of NYPD officers who they will not allow to testify in court because they can’t be trusted to testify honestly. Seems like if they an’t be trusted to tell the truth in court, there might be issues trusting them to honestly uphold the law? (George Joseph for Gothamist)

It started with a white picket fence and quickly escalated to racial discrimination in Flushing. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

It took 125 years, but the lions outside the NYPL are finally reading thanks to some very large books. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Newkirk Plaza is America’s oldest outdoor shopping plaza, and it seems no one wants to be responsible for it. The city and MTA have discussed who is responsible for management, funding and safety without a conclusion, mirroring most disagreements between the state and city. If neither step up, maybe the growing rat population will start cleaning the place up. (Katie Herchenroeder for Bklyner)

New ethics violations charges have been filed against Andy King, who finished the punishment for his last ethics violation charges less than three months ago. This time around it’s disorderly induct and conflict-of-interest violations by using public funds for personal benefit. This happened while a court-appointed monitor was watching over King’s actions. The city council voted to not expel King 34-12 back in October. Maybe they’ll change their tune this time. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

If you’ve ever been walking through the city late at night, you’ve watched private garbage trucks blow through red lights without slowing down or drive the wrong way on one way streets. Between 2016 and 1018 privately owned garbage trucks were involved in 73 series accidents. A new law is looking to control the private garbage industry over the next three years, which picks up half of the city’s garbage. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

After half a century, a legendary pool hall in Bay Ridge, Hall of Fame Billiards, is closing. (Kimon de Green for Bedford + Bowery)

Here are the four people running for City Councilmember Rafael Espinal’s seat after he abruptly quit his job representing Cypress Hills, Bushwick, East New York, and Brownsville. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum continues to unravel after the forced resignation of director Caroline Baumann, with five trustees resigning in protest. (Robin Pogrebin for NY Times)

LGBTQ groups have once again been rejected from participating in the Staten Island St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 1. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

What’s the difference between co-ops and condos and what the heck is a condop? (Localize.City)

Reminder: If you see a hawk, don’t go close to it. It’s likely hunting and you’re ruining its potential meal. (Laura Goggin)

A ban on brokers fees will benefit tenants in the long run to the tune of $7,000 on average in the first year, and that includes a rent hike. (Beth Dedman for amNewYork Metro)

The best happy hours in 31 neighborhoods. (Rachel Pelz for Thrillist)