The Briefly for October 7, 2019 – The “A $41 Million Oversight in Long Island City” Edition

Late-night subway closures, safe injection sites get another boost, the woman in the Bronx Zoo lion’s enclosure wasn’t as brave/stupid as you think, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

You’re in the clear for late-night trains this week, unless you’re taking the 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, A, F, N, Q, or R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Construction meant to eventually speed up the subways is causing all sorts of problems for anyone who needs to get around at night, especially for people coming and going from work. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Columbia University is honoring Maya Angelou, Gloria E. Anzaldúa, Diana Chang, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, A. Revathi, Ntozake Shange, and Leslie Marmon Silko by hanging their names on a banner above the names of male philosophers that are engraved on the building. (Untapped Cities)

Take a look at what Brooklyn’s tallest office building will look like on the inside. (Curbed)

With $41 million spent on the Hunter’s Point library, you wouldn’t imagine they’d already be rearranging the books, but here we are. Three fiction sections will be relocated after it was pointed out that they were only accessible via the stairs and anyone unable to use stairs would be shut out of those sections. The staff says they’ll retrieve books for people who want to check them out, but maybe instead an accessible library should have been designed instead. (Gothamist)

We’re getting close to peak foliage in the city, so until we’re past it I’ll keep listing these foliage guides. The carless New Yorker’s guide to fall foliage. (Patch)

The luxury apartment development that will sit on the old 5 Pointz spot in Queens got full-throated support for a 1,100 apartment expansion from Community Board 5 after setting aside 5,000 square feet for a library, creating additional below-market-rate housing, and increasing the size of the artist studio and gallery. (Curbed)

8 notable NYC projects designed by Latino architects. (Curbed)

Dante in Greenwich Village has been named the #1 bar in the world. (Time Out)

Did your favorites make the list? Here are the restaurants ordered closed this week. (Patch)

Is Governor Cuomo scared to open safe injection sites in the city? A federal judge ruled this week that safe injection sites don’t violate federal law, so what’s he waiting for? (Gothamist)

Para Roberto is the city’s newest monument which is in tribute to Roberto Clemente, which features bronze sugar cane stalks, a chair made of baseball bats and stickball bats adorned with the Puerto Rican flag. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Okay, who’s the asshole pointing lasers at planes? (Gothamist)

Five slices in five boroughs in one weekend day. It sounds impossible, but an uphill battle never stopped a New Yorker before. Welcome to the Five Borough Pizza Challenge. (QNS)

There was a rumor that an Outback Steakhouse was moving into the old Union Square Coffee Shop location. Thankfully, that rumor isn’t true, but a Chase bank is going in alongside a Just by Chole. (Gothamist)

The borough with the most heat and hot water complaints in the city is the Bronx, with 33.1% of the city’s complaints. (Curbed)

What building has the most complaints? It’s on Elmhurst Ave in Queens<>/a>. (Jackson Heights Post)

In praise of the vegan-egg sandwich that’s almost as satisfying as its bodega cousin. (Grub Street)

After the second friendly-fire killing this year, advocates are calling for more firearms training for the NYPD. (Gothamist)

Photo galleries of coslay from New York Comic Con: Gothamist | Gizmodo | Time Out | Brooklyn Vegan

An important note about Myah Autry, the woman wanted by the NYPD for jumping into the lion and giraffe enclosures at the Bronx Zoo: While she was inside the enclosure, she was on the other side of a moat from the lions and not nearly in the danger she’d like you to think she was in. Now her real danger comes from the NYPD. (NY Times)

A 24-year-old suspect was arrested for killing four men assumed to be homeless in Chinatown and a fifth was taken to a hospital. (NY Times)

A history of Red Hook’s Barnacle Parade, the annual taunting that Hurricane Sandy may have damaged the neighborhood but it did not break its spirits. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

It took less than a day for the brand new playground at Tompkins Square Park to be vandalized. (EV Grieve)

The 24th bike rider killed by a motorist in the city in 2019 is 10-year-old Dalerjon Shahobiddinov of Brooklyn. (Streetsblog)

Brooklyn’s best dive bars. (Thrillist)

The Briefly for August 28, 2019 – The “Signs of a Wegmans Grows in Brooklyn” Edition

The growth in the car population is outpacing the growth of the actual population, the best floor in a walk-up, taking a wallaby for a walk, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

All the street closings and timing of the West Indian Day Parade and all the associated events over Labor Day weekend. (Curbed)

An Andy Warhol tour and map of Manhattan from artist Patricia Fernández. (Untapped Cities)

Five takeaways from the plan to scrap the city’s gifted school programs. Will Mayor de Blasio follow the recommendation from the task force he assembled or will he try to run out the clock as he did with Eric Garner’s death? (NY Times)

It’s getting real. Signs are going up at the home of the future Brooklyn Wegmans. (Brownstoner)

Does it seem odd to anyone else that the mayor is supporting restrictions to hotel development after receiving support and campaign contributions from the hotel industry union? (6sqft)

The Mast Brothers are out of Brooklyn, doing the hipster move from Williamsburg to upstate. (Eater)

Every neighborhood has its old-school spots that have been there for decades, and many of them are endangered. Two Toms in Gowanus has been family owned since 1948, but the building the restaurant is in is for sale and the listing says it could be delivered vacant “if necessary.” (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The growth of the number of cars in the city is outpacing the growth of the city’s population. (Streetsblog)

The city is full of hidden history. Sometimes that history is a poster from 2000 for the movie Road Trip. (Gothamist)

In praise of the Manhattan dive bar: Cheap beer and good atmosphere are increasingly hard to find, but it’s out there. (amNY)

A worker was killed and five injured in a partial building collapse in Norwood in the Bronx. (Metro)

A wall in Chinatown with messages of support for the protests in Hong Kong has been vandalized twice in less than a week. Global politics are also local politics. (Gothamist)

What’s the best floor to live on in a six-floor walk-up? (Street Easy)

Jeffrey Epstein’s victims will never have their full day in court, but they have vowed to not stop fighting. (Gothamist)

The family of Eric Garner filed a judicial inquiry of Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill to answer questions about their handling of Eric Garner’s death at the hands of the NYPD. (Politico)

Leslie Jones is not returning to SNL. (Gothamist)

Video: Nothing to see here here, just a man walking taking his pet wallaby for a walk. Nope, this was in Bed-Stuy, not Bushwick. (Patch)

The total population in the city’s jails has fallen 23% from 2014, but the population jailed for parole violations increased by 20% in the same period, with the average stay lasting 60 days while they wait for parole court dates. (Gothamist)

Seven acres under the new Kosciuszko Bridge in Greenpoint will be made into a park. There’s no proposed opening date and construction has not begun. The project will be lead by the North Brooklyn Parks Alliance. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Conservative Times Op-Ed columnist and climate change denier Bret Stephens quit Twitter because someone called him a “bedbug.” Poor Bret. (Gothamist)

Video: It’ll take more than It’s Pennywise the clown to rattle New Yorkers riding the L late at night. (Patch)

28 of the best sports bars in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 31, 2019 – The “Getting Paid Not to Show Up to Work” Edition

Triple-digit heat in subway stations, the MTA is accused of discrimination, de Blasio denies the Brownsville shooting was a “mass shooting,” dine-in movie theaters, and more in today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Balance your anger with hope and vision appears to be the message from Danny Harris, the new executive director of Transportation Alternatives, the largest advocacy group for better bicycling, walking, and public transit. In an interview with Streetsblog, he comes across more pragmatist than angry bike guy yelling at people on the Brooklyn Bridge. (Streetsblog)

Could hackers bring the city’s streets to a halt? Yes, and here’s how according to the journal Physical Review. (Patch)

Queens Community Board 2 rejected a plan to add 100 apartments to the development that replaced 5Pointz in Long Island City. (Curbed)

A state audit proved what every New Yorker already assumed: the MTA’s projects are plagued by overruns. Contractors were paid and sometimes didn’t show up, design problems lead to delays, and nearly everything costs more than budgeted. (Curbed)

Can brand-new bar with a wine selection and a $6 Miller High Life be considered a dive? (Grub Street)

A tribute to Arcade Bakery, “one of New York’s best bakeries hiding in plain sight,” which closes its doors for good on August 2. (Grub Street)

A town hall centered on rent laws has the potential to be contentious enough before a bunch of anti-vaccination idiots decide to commandeer the room. (The Villager)

Denizens of Coney Island are protesting one of two options for a city ferry dock in an attempt to preserve a fishing area. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A preview of the Gansevoort Peninsula, a 5.5-acre space and the future home of Manhattan’s first public beach. (The Villager)

Was the shooting in Brownsville a mass shooting? According to the mayor and failing presidential hopeful, no. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling for more anti-violence funding and not more police after last weekend’s shooting in Brownsville. As he put it, “If police could solve the problem, it would be solved already.” (Gothamist)

Video: Who preserves the MoMA’s vintage electronic art? Meet television repairman Chi-Tien Lui. (Viewing NYC)

When the NY Times suggests going to the East River for “the freshest fish,” you should note Pete Wells is reviewing The Fulton and not suggesting catching and eating your lunch. (NY Times)

Is this marker in Woodside, Queens really the center of NYC? (6sqft)

A new mural in NoMad pays tribute to Evelyn Nesbit, aka “The Gilded Lady,” an actor, model, and New Yorkers whose life would be considered scandalous today, let alone in the early 1900s. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA is facing claims that three of its agents discriminated against a black woman wearing a hijab earlier this year. (amNY)

The person who doored Em Samolewicz, the act that lead to her death, was given a summons for $133, but the truck driver who hit and killed her remains uncharged. (Streetsblog)

Let that Kubrick obsessed friend of yours know that a comprehensive 2001: A Space Odyssey exhibit is coming to the Museum Of The Moving Image. (Gothamist)

When a pool and gym isn’t enough, luxury buildings are turning towards amenities like private IMAX screens, Turkish baths, a wine tasting room, and private driveways. (StreetEasy)

It’s not uncommon for a subway station to hit triple digits in the summer. (Viewing NYC)

The Global Citizen Festival announced its 2019 lineup with Queen + Adam Lambert, Alicia Keys, and Carole King among the headliners. Unlike OZY Fest, a festival in Central Park in late September has a low chance of being canceled due to heat. (BrooklynVegan)

G train operator Eric Boyo saved a woman’s life by pulling the emergency brake while pulling into the Fulton Street station after discovering a woman was on the tracks. (amNY)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is taking its advocacy fight against a proposed building complex with a new exhibit called “Fight for Sunlight.” (amNY)

The New York City Community Garden Coalition is protesting the city’s new four-year agreements citing overly restrictive rules and regulations. As a result, less than half of the city’s 550 gardens have signed leases. (amNY)

A look at the new technologies that the MTA will be piloting. Most of the startups are focused on attempting to make eventual failures and crowding easier to anticipate and communicate. (Curbed)

Governor Cuomo tried to hide the real reason the former MTA chairman Joseph Lhota quit last November. The real reason was the state’s ethics watchdog determined he couldn’t do his job and avoid conflicts of interest with his work outside the MTA. (amNY)

A definitive guide to the city’s dine-in movie theaters. (Eater)

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