The Briefly for September 20-21, 2020 – The “Don’t Call This A Staycation” Sunday Edition

Sunday’s NYC news digest: A potpourri of news, a RBG statue, City Hall’s annual report card, what we miss from pre-pandemic NYC, how to pack an emergency bag, and more

Today – Low: 52˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be honored with a statue in Brooklyn. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

NYC’s legal community reflects on RBG’s life and work. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It feels insulting for for the city to push an advertising campaign that New Yorkers should “staycation” in New York City. Turns out when you remove the tourists from midtown, we still hate midtown. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has issued exactly zero summonses for mask non-compliance. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The anatomy of an NYC protest. Which role do you play? (Juliana Kim and Simbarashe Cha for NY Times)

New York City’s school reopening plans are still missing a key ingredient: enough teachers. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Parents and students react to the city’s constant waffling about the start of the school year. This feels like trying to read all of your summer reading in the weekend before school starts. (Sophia Chang, Gwynne Hogan, Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

The de Blasio administration released a 420-page document tracking City Hall operations for the last year. Murders are up. Juvenile arrests are up. Violent incidents in jails are up while population is down. The “excess death” rate” suggests the death toll from Covid-19 might be well over 50,000. NYPD response times are up. Response times for emergency complaints in NYCHA buildings is up. The homeless population increased. The good news? Rat complaints are down and there were new bike lanes built. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The report “Discipline in the NYPD 2019” outlines, but doesn’t detail, 339 cases in which officers faced departmental charges. Cops pleaded or were found guilty in 322 of those cases. Only 27 lost their jobs. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Murderinos: Look no further than your own backyard. The untold story of the Tompkins Square murder. (David Swanson for Village Voice from 1989)

Businesses around Yankee Stadium held a rally Thursday afternoon demanding that the city renegotiate the lease and tax deal that Yankee management worked out to stay in the Bronx under the Bloomberg administration, claiming that extra money obtained through the negotiation could help keep businesses surrounding the stadium stay afloat until fans are able to return to the stadium. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The 2020 fall foliage map. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

At the crossroads of art and commerce is the controversy at the Whitney, who canceled an exhibition of arresting responses to the pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests after artists of color criticized the Whitney for acquiring their work without consent and through discount sales. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

A look at how Governors Island could become a climate center for the city. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The mayor, possibly unaware that he is the mayor, made public comments about how outdoor dining “should become permanent.” Will he walk the walk or just talk the talk? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The pandemic tax? City Council voted in favor of giving restaurants the option to add a 10% charge to bills as an economic recovery support measure. The mayor supports the bill and once he signs it, it will be in effect immediately until indoor dining returns to full capacity. I guess the city’s response to us asking it to help restaurants is “help them yourself.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

If the last few years have seen the food world grapple with systemic issues like pay disparities, culinary credit, tipping, and harassment from either big-time chefs or everyday customers, the poorly regulated return of indoor dining — during a deadly pandemic, no less — feels like a middle finger to hospitality workers.
-Ryan Sutton, chief food critic for Eater, NYC’s Indoor Dining Comeback Fails Restaurant Workers. Here’s Why. for Eater

The city’s first store dedicated to Covid-19 essentials opened in Herald Square. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new report from Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office found that 57 percent of dogs tested at city-run shelters developed respiratory disease during their stays, among other troubling findings. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD is working with the Trump administration to blame violent crime on bail reform by bringing federal charges instead of local charges against people suspected of involvement in shootings. The NYPD’s own data shows a lack of a link between bail reform and the increase in violent crime, but the truth has never stopped the NYPD of Trump administration before. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The mayor announced he will force his staff to take an unpaid one-week furlough between October 2020 and March 2021 to save money. It will save under a million dollars. The mayor is currently looking for a billion dollars of savings or will lay off 22,000 city employees. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Wanna buy a T. rex skeleton? Stan, the T. rex, is up for auction on October 6 at Christie’s. (Zachary Smalls for NY Times)

Photos: Sunnyside has become the home of fairies. No, really. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Where to eat outside in Prospect Heights. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

A love letter to the 1993 Super Mario Bros movie, a movie about two brothers from Brooklyn. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

Indoor pools will be able to open on September 30 at 33% capacity. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Apartment Porn: A $16.5 million Upper East Side townhouse with a miniature pool and a roof garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

More than 170 New York City transit workers have been harassed or assaulted for asking passengers to wear masks. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

38 glorious Chinese restaurants open right now. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It’s not uncommon to see people sitting outside libraries in an attempt to use the free wifi. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Columbia’s marching band disbanded itself for “a history riddled with offensive behavior.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

Bankruptcy will not stop New York Sports Clubs from charging you your monthly fee. The state attorney general’s office is investigating. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Trick or treating is nor canceled this year, ensuring the scariest Halloween of all time. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There will be no snow days at all this year, as classes will move to remote learning in case of snow. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

Dante in Greenwich Village, voted world’s best bar by Time Out) is now offering canned cocktails. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

In praise of Gloria’s Caribbean, a Crown Heights mainstay. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s real estate market has been hotter than Manhattan’s, pre- and post-pandemic. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork Metro)

Time Out looks back to the 10 things we miss the most about the Before Times in NYC. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: “Doggy Bags” brings giant dog sculptures to the Garment District. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How to pack an emergency bag. Just in case. (A. C. Shilton for NY Times)

NYC’s most anticipated restaurants openings of fall 2020. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Briefly for August 3, 2020 – The “Fired Anywhere But New York City” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor’s staff keeps quitting, 15 new Open Restaurant streets, AOC weighs in on the Port Authority’s federal funding, a whale saved, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 88˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Tuesday is looking rough in the city. Tropical Storm Isaias is predicted to hit the city sometime Tuesday afternoon. Just in time for my dogs to need a walk. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

“I’m telling you we’re going to have an issue.” Governor Cuomo isn’t an optimist when it comes to the city’s economic recovery. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Katz’s launched its own delivery service. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The mayor has been suspending alternate side parking on and off for months and he was never aware that the city uses street cleaning days for bike lane work. Good thing the mayor spent all that effort to “lighten the burden” of car ownership, in his own words. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The mayor is doing such a great job serving the city that six high-ranking staffers of Mayor de Blasio’s have quit in the last month. As everyone knows, there’s no better time to leave your government job than during an economic crisis in the middle of a pandemic for a mayor who will be out of office in less than two years. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Calls for NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea to resign have grown louder in the past few weeks. The pandemic and protests following the murder of George Floyd have shown that the NYPD’s commissioner has the back of the citizens of the NYPD and not the citizens of NYC and has exacerbated problems between the two. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

It’s hard to imagine another city where the commissioner, who is appointed by and serves at the pleasure of the mayor, would keep their job in the face of everything that Dermot Shea has said and done, but most cities aren’t governed by the coward Bill de Blasio. Sometimes I editorialize in these moments, but this piece in the Times looks at just how weird it is that Shea has kept his job despite almost a decade of de Blasio calling for police reforms. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Following Andrew Coté, who spent his pandemic rescuing beehives across the city. (Stephanie Simon)

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey was hit with a $777 million drop in revenues in the first half of the year and is pleading for federal assistance, potentially losing $3 billion by March 2022. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

“While some of this funding may be critical to stabilize Port Authority operations, no funding should be provided to the AirTrain; the AirTrain is an unnecessary boondoggle that will hamper economic recovery in our watershed, a region in Northern Queens that has been heavily impacted by Covid-19,” -AOC (Angélica Acevedo for QNS)

You might have done everything right when it came to your absentee ballot and the Board of Elections still may have invalidated it. In a misunderstanding between the state and the post office, it’s possible the post office didn’t postmark your ballot and it also didn’t deliver it before the June 30 deadline. The exact number of rejected ballots will be announced on Tuesday. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Even if we admit that everyone who touched the ballots (except voters) was at fault, what are the next steps? We’re expecting a ruling this week in a court case that will decide the fate of many of these invalidated votes. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

One of the things that sucks the most about the voting mess from the June 23 primary is that the city is now being held up by President Trashbag as a reason to not move forward with mail-in voting. There was no malfeasance involved, but the state and the federal government let us down with a failure to perform in June and we don’t have much time before November roars through. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

It has taken the city an embarrassingly long amount of time to create the No-Penalty Business Accessory Sign Inspection program in reaction to the panic going around small businesses after hundreds of complaints were filed in November of 2018, leading to many businesses just ripping their signs down in confusion/fear. It shouldn’t take a deadly pandemic for the city to help small businesses become compliant with regulations. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The Top of the Rock will reopen this Thursday with free admission to essential workers and a guest from August 14-16. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

American Museum of Natural History is reopening on Sept. 9, pending permission from state and city officials, with a 25% capacity. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

Ronny Vargas and Alex Sauzo were arrested for throwing an illegal and non-socially distanced three-hour boat party in the East River with 17u2 people aboard. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

A humpback whale was successfully freed by NOAA over the weekend after being entangled in a mess of buoys and fishing line for several days. Humpback whales returning to NYC’s waterways is a positive sign that preservation efforts are working, but also a sign that we’ll need to continue those efforts to keep them safe. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Photos: If you don’t have an easy means to see it yourself, there is a tribute to Elijah McClain by artist Vincent Ballentine in the First Street Green Art Park. (EV Grieve)

3% is the city’s threshold for keeping the schools open. As long as the city’s seven-day rolling average positivity rate stays below 3%, schools will stay open. The rate has been between 1% and 2% for about two months. The city will no mandate that staff or students get tested for Covid-19. The chair of the City Council’s education committee calls the city’s plans “an unfunded proposal that is incomplete.” The head of the teacher’s union says “This is not enough to protect students and staff.” (Elizabeth Kim and David Cruz for Gothamist)

15 more streets were added to the city’s Open Restaurants program, which allows restaurants to expand into the streets on the weekend. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

NYPD officer Kevin Martin was arrested and charged with evidence tampering and official misconduct. Martin has been the subject of 14 investigations by the Civilian Complaint Review Board and 18 of the 45 different allegations brought against him have been substantiated and he was named in six lawsuits, which cost the city over $1 million in settlements. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Good morning to Murphy, the newborn harbor seal pup in the New York Aquarium in Coney Island. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: The MTA is trying out six new kinds of subway maps. If you want to see them in person, take the R all the way to 86th St in Brooklyn, or just look at the photos. (Ben Yakas, photos by Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

17 public art installations not to miss in August, including the new installation in the Socrates Sculpture Park. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

An airport replacing Central Park? Is this some sort of joke? Yes, it is. (Josh Vogel for NYC Urbanism)

11 food and drink pop-ups in NYC this summer. Happy to see Bad Trip on the list in Dumbo, it’s my favorite of this summer’s picks. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for April 24, 2020 – The “Someone Told Me It Was the Weekend” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 21.2% of the city may have already been exposed to COVID-19, a cocktail delivery guide, you cannot have friends over for dinner, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 50˚
Rain until evening.
This weekend – Low: 44˚ High: 61˚

Quick note: Yesterday I said that “At 40,000 a day, it’ll only take 13 and a half years to test the whole state” talking about COVID-19 tests. I mistakenly did the math for 40,000 a month, not 40,000 a day. At 40,000 a day it’ll take 486 days to test everyone in the state once. Thanks to reader Stacy for catching the error

Alright, some cats are getting COVID-19, here’s an interview with experts on what to worry about and what to relax about. (Shame Weaver for Time Out)

A new survey suggests that 21.2% of New York City residents have COVID-19 antibodies, meaning a whole lot of us have already had the virus and never knew it. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new study from the medical journal JAMA showed 88 percent of COVID-19 patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation in the Northwell Health system lost their lives. The study looked at 5,700 intubated patients. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The cocktail delivery guide, because I heard somewhere that it’s the weekend. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Mayor de Blasio has never let advice from professionals stop him from making a decision that he wants to make. The entire city told him not to run for president and he did anyway. He doesn’t want to open the city’s streets up for pedestrians and cyclists and he won’t unless he’s forced. He’s canceled two months’ worth of summer events but has decided that the Fourth of July fireworks must go on because it would “hurt the morale of New Yorkers as they’re fighting this fight.” Buddy, 11,000 of your citizens have died. Fireworks aren’t gonna save the city. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

Shame is a powerful weapon. Ruth’s Chris is going to return their $20 million from the federal government. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Sweetgreen, not wanting to be left out, will return the $10 million the government loaned to it. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Briefly favorite Jen Carlson has a question. Is it snowing outside? Seriously, when was the last time you were outside? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Can you have friends over for dinner? For god’s sake, NO! (Ronda Kaysen for NY Times)

People who have dogs live longer. Are people in dog-friendly buildings happier than their dogless counterparts? Yes they are! (Susan Lehman for NY Times)

Pairing takeout with a movie, because there’s only so many times you can heat up something frozen and watch Friends. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, Katherine Lewin, Hillary Reinsberg, Arden Shore, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Feeling like going out? Well, you can’t, but you can try out NYC’s best attempts at recreating nightlife virtually with this list of the best clubs to party at online. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

A look at “Tiger King” with Harlem’s Tiger Man, Antoine Yates, who kept 425-pound Ming the Tiger in his apartment. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

The City Council is moving on helping small businesses with legislation that would put it place a pause on evictions for commercial and residential tenants that would remain in place through April 2021. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

If you find a wedding ring on the corner of 87th and West End, please return it to the woman who lost it during the 7pm clap out her window. The ring is a plain platinum band and the couple who lost it has been together for over 50 years. (Mike Michkin for I Love The Upper West Side)

As food suppliers and farmers are looking at having to destroy or dispose of the food they create, State Senator Joseph Addabbo is looking to pair those farmers with those in need to prevent waste and hunger at the same time. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Apartment Porn: A $9.3 million Tribeca penthouse with an irrigated roof garden and outdoor kitchen, two living rooms, a walk-in pantry, and three bedrooms with en-suite bathrooms, on top of everything else. (Dana Schulz for 6qsft)

Here’s how the city ould address its sidewalks after it has become abundantly clear that they have failed us as a place to practice proper social distancing. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Looking to get into a Trader Joe’s? Now there are Twitter accounts telling you how long the lines are. Right now, they’re run by people who live nearby and want to be helpful while quarantining. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

An ode to an unlikely restaurant pick, especially in NYC, Blimpie. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

This year’s AIDS Walk will now be a virtual happening, with its date moving from May 17 to June 7. (Paul Schindler for Gay City News)

The state’s Department of Health and Attorney General Letitia James are investigating New York nursing homes to determine if management complied with COVID-19 regulations, with violated facing fines and the potential loss of their licenses. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city’s 140,000 coronavirus cases are only the tip of the iceberg. According to Health Commissioner Oxiris Barbot, “we have probably close to a million New Yorkers who have been exposed to COVID-19.” (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The percent of NYPD officers calling out sick has dropped for two weeks straight. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

Spruce up your Zoom backgrounds with some of these images from Parks@Home, historical photos from the Records Department, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, or the NYPL. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Know someone who needs a sugar rush? Economy Candy is now selling CandyCare Packs. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

When you call a restaurant using the number listed on GrubHub/Seamless, the restaurant is charged a fee from the company, which some are complaining to be as high as $7.17. If you’ve got a question or a problem with your order, look up the restaurant’s phone number using a different method and stop making orders through GrubHub/Seamless. Call the restaurant directly and make your order. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

I am 100% on board for Governor Cuomo’s shit-talking on Mitch McConnell. (NY1)

SNL has another quarantine episode this weekend. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Ample Hills is putting itself on the auction block to companies like Cinnabon and Auntie Anne’s owner Focus Brands and Unilever. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A look at Rockefeller Center under construction in 1932. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

8 books for when you miss New York City, even though you’re quarantined here. (Isabel Crabtree for New York Cliche)

A free adult coloring book, full of color from city life, is available for download from Subway Creates and artist David Regone. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Take a tour of the first NYC public health lab to test for COVID-19. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

Your questions, answered by The City. (Lauren Costantino and Allison Dikanovic for The City)

40 pizza parlors still open for the best possible Friday night meal. (Diana Hubbell for Eater)

Thanks to reader Annie for today’s featured photo.