The Briefly for April 24, 2020 – The “Someone Told Me It Was the Weekend” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 21.2% of the city may have already been exposed to COVID-19, a cocktail delivery guide, you cannot have friends over for dinner, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 50˚
Rain until evening.
This weekend – Low: 44˚ High: 61˚

Quick note: Yesterday I said that “At 40,000 a day, it’ll only take 13 and a half years to test the whole state” talking about COVID-19 tests. I mistakenly did the math for 40,000 a month, not 40,000 a day. At 40,000 a day it’ll take 486 days to test everyone in the state once. Thanks to reader Stacy for catching the error

Alright, some cats are getting COVID-19, here’s an interview with experts on what to worry about and what to relax about. (Shame Weaver for Time Out)

A new survey suggests that 21.2% of New York City residents have COVID-19 antibodies, meaning a whole lot of us have already had the virus and never knew it. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new study from the medical journal JAMA showed 88 percent of COVID-19 patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation in the Northwell Health system lost their lives. The study looked at 5,700 intubated patients. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The cocktail delivery guide, because I heard somewhere that it’s the weekend. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Mayor de Blasio has never let advice from professionals stop him from making a decision that he wants to make. The entire city told him not to run for president and he did anyway. He doesn’t want to open the city’s streets up for pedestrians and cyclists and he won’t unless he’s forced. He’s canceled two months’ worth of summer events but has decided that the Fourth of July fireworks must go on because it would “hurt the morale of New Yorkers as they’re fighting this fight.” Buddy, 11,000 of your citizens have died. Fireworks aren’t gonna save the city. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

Shame is a powerful weapon. Ruth’s Chris is going to return their $20 million from the federal government. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Sweetgreen, not wanting to be left out, will return the $10 million the government loaned to it. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Briefly favorite Jen Carlson has a question. Is it snowing outside? Seriously, when was the last time you were outside? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Can you have friends over for dinner? For god’s sake, NO! (Ronda Kaysen for NY Times)

People who have dogs live longer. Are people in dog-friendly buildings happier than their dogless counterparts? Yes they are! (Susan Lehman for NY Times)

Pairing takeout with a movie, because there’s only so many times you can heat up something frozen and watch Friends. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, Katherine Lewin, Hillary Reinsberg, Arden Shore, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Feeling like going out? Well, you can’t, but you can try out NYC’s best attempts at recreating nightlife virtually with this list of the best clubs to party at online. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

A look at “Tiger King” with Harlem’s Tiger Man, Antoine Yates, who kept 425-pound Ming the Tiger in his apartment. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

The City Council is moving on helping small businesses with legislation that would put it place a pause on evictions for commercial and residential tenants that would remain in place through April 2021. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

If you find a wedding ring on the corner of 87th and West End, please return it to the woman who lost it during the 7pm clap out her window. The ring is a plain platinum band and the couple who lost it has been together for over 50 years. (Mike Michkin for I Love The Upper West Side)

As food suppliers and farmers are looking at having to destroy or dispose of the food they create, State Senator Joseph Addabbo is looking to pair those farmers with those in need to prevent waste and hunger at the same time. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Apartment Porn: A $9.3 million Tribeca penthouse with an irrigated roof garden and outdoor kitchen, two living rooms, a walk-in pantry, and three bedrooms with en-suite bathrooms, on top of everything else. (Dana Schulz for 6qsft)

Here’s how the city ould address its sidewalks after it has become abundantly clear that they have failed us as a place to practice proper social distancing. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Looking to get into a Trader Joe’s? Now there are Twitter accounts telling you how long the lines are. Right now, they’re run by people who live nearby and want to be helpful while quarantining. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

An ode to an unlikely restaurant pick, especially in NYC, Blimpie. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

This year’s AIDS Walk will now be a virtual happening, with its date moving from May 17 to June 7. (Paul Schindler for Gay City News)

The state’s Department of Health and Attorney General Letitia James are investigating New York nursing homes to determine if management complied with COVID-19 regulations, with violated facing fines and the potential loss of their licenses. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city’s 140,000 coronavirus cases are only the tip of the iceberg. According to Health Commissioner Oxiris Barbot, “we have probably close to a million New Yorkers who have been exposed to COVID-19.” (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The percent of NYPD officers calling out sick has dropped for two weeks straight. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

Spruce up your Zoom backgrounds with some of these images from Parks@Home, historical photos from the Records Department, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, or the NYPL. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Know someone who needs a sugar rush? Economy Candy is now selling CandyCare Packs. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

When you call a restaurant using the number listed on GrubHub/Seamless, the restaurant is charged a fee from the company, which some are complaining to be as high as $7.17. If you’ve got a question or a problem with your order, look up the restaurant’s phone number using a different method and stop making orders through GrubHub/Seamless. Call the restaurant directly and make your order. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

I am 100% on board for Governor Cuomo’s shit-talking on Mitch McConnell. (NY1)

SNL has another quarantine episode this weekend. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Ample Hills is putting itself on the auction block to companies like Cinnabon and Auntie Anne’s owner Focus Brands and Unilever. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A look at Rockefeller Center under construction in 1932. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

8 books for when you miss New York City, even though you’re quarantined here. (Isabel Crabtree for New York Cliche)

A free adult coloring book, full of color from city life, is available for download from Subway Creates and artist David Regone. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Take a tour of the first NYC public health lab to test for COVID-19. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

Your questions, answered by The City. (Lauren Costantino and Allison Dikanovic for The City)

40 pizza parlors still open for the best possible Friday night meal. (Diana Hubbell for Eater)

Thanks to reader Annie for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for April 7, 2020 – The “No, We Are Not Burying Dead Bodies in City Parks” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor ends his open streets program, a guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery, the hardest temp job in the city, weird things people are doing, & more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 64˚
Light rain overnight.

Punk Island, one of the city’s best DIY and free music festivals, is postponed from its usual June date. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Video: A beautifully shot montage of a barren city, titled “The New Normal Quarantine.” (Matt Chirico)

No matter what you read, the city does not have plans to bury the dead in public parks. The rumor originated by Mark D. Levine, the Chair of New York City Council health committee, who spent the entire day on Twitter walking back the mess that he created. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s official body count from COVID-19 of 2,738 is likely a vast undercount. On a “normal” day, about 20-25 New Yorkers die in their homes, but in our new reality, about 200 people are dying at home on a daily basis. Those bodies are not tested for COVID-19, so they are not listed as a confirmed case. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

City schools will continue remote learning on Passover and Good Friday this year, completely removing spring break from the calendar. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The June Regents exams are canceled. The state is trying to figure out graduation requirements since the Regents is a requirement. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

If the June Regents are canceled, does the June SAT and ACT date stand a chance? (Benjamin Mandile for QNS)

A look inside the slow collapse of the city’s catering industry. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

If you’re having trouble understanding what being six feet apart looks like, the city is installing signs showing you how far to stay away from your fellow New Yorker. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I don’t think that when Acting Queens Borough President Sharon Lee accepted a temporary job that she’d be imagining she’d be overseeing the worst-hit county in the country with an election date that was already postponed once. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

If you’re looking for the slightest bit of good news, it seems like the growth of the novel coronavirus outbreak in New York City might be slowing down. (Ann Choi and Yoav Gonen for The City)

Three cheers to the landlords across the city choosing to not demand rent this month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The first jail inmate to test positive for COVID-19 at Rikers Island, Michael Tyson (not the one you’re thinking of), died on Sunday while awaiting a hearing on a parole violation. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

The New York Public Library and WYNC are teaming together to launch a virtual book club, the club is virtual, the book is real. The first book is James McBride’s Deacon King Kong. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Yes, a tiger in the Bronx Zoo has COVID-19. Your pet is probably okay. Just treat them as an extension of yourself. Keep distance from other people and dogs. (James Gorman for NY Times)

Tuesday night will be a pink supermoon, climbing to its highest point at 10:35 pm. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What’s harder than finding a good one-bedroom in a great neighborhood that doesn’t break the bank? Trying to order groceries for delivery. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Your best bets for grocery delivery in the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New York is on PAUSE through April 29, a two-week extension. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Video: It’s a touch of history from the end of World War I in Woodhaven. The Memorial Trees were planted after the first world war and were mostly forgotten to time until a few years ago. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

It seems that we’re not good at staying home, according to our location data. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Maybe that’s why 311 received over 4,000 complaints about a lack of social distancing in its first week of receiving complaints. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York Cliché, a favorite of The Briefly, is looking for pitches and is paying for posts. She wrote a great piece about getting tickets to late-night talk shows, but then the world went to hell so I never posted it. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

Reimagined NYC road signs for our new lives by artist Dylan Coonrad. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A list of NYC restaurants raising funds to feed healthcare workers. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art released a new lineup of free digital programming. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Satire: NYPD Razes Central Park Hospital Tents For Violating Outdoor Encampment Laws. (The Onion)

Performance activist Billy Talen was arrested after planting a rainbow flag on Sunday in protesting Samaritan’s Purse, the anti-gay religious group behind Central Park’s field hospital. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor is ending his “open streets” program after it wasn’t popular enough to justify the heavy NYPD presence at each closed street. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A running list of Mayor de Blasio’s coronavirus response missteps. (Elizabeth Kim, Jen Carlson, and Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 major proposals not included in the state’s new budget. #1? Marijuana legalization. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve done in quarantine? (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The pandemic guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Lisa Rosenblum for submitting today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 3, 2020 – The “Dropping the Ball, Not the Groundhog” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: How NYC became “Gotham,” Governor Cuomo’s ego pushed Andy Byford out, the mayor ignoes his BQE panel, the best restaurants in Sunset Park and more.

Today – Low: 41˚ High: 51˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

16 places to celebrate Black History Month in NYC. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Interested in changing your political party affiliation before the June primaries? Act quickly, the deadline is February 14th. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Staten Island’s Chuck the Groundhog didn’t see his shadow on Sunday morning, which means that an early spring should be on its way. At least no one dropped him. (Adams Nichols for Patch)

Let’s never forget when Mayor de Blasio murdered Staten Island Chuck by dropping him on Groundhog’s Day. Chuck died a week after the drop. (Abby Ohlheiser for The Washington Post)

The City Council has taken the reigns on leading the city, due to the oiler vacuum left behind by Mayor de Blasio’s complete lack of projected strength as the leader of the city. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

11 days before volunteers participated in an annual count of the homeless sleeping on the city’s streets, the mayor’s office attempted to misrepresent the actual number by attempting to find more beds for the homeless. (Mirela Iverac for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio is walking away from his own “expert” panel’s central recommendation for fixing the BQE because he believes the disproven fallacy that eliminating lanes of traffic adds to congestion, instead of actually reducing it. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Here’s how “induced demand” works, a concept known since the 60’s: “on urban commuter expressways, peak-hour traffic congestion rises to meet maximum capacity.” (Benjamin Schneider for CityLab)

The city is going to start enforcing the law when it comes to overweight trucks on the BQE, per the panels suggestion. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

One thing’s for sure, we have less than five years if the city doesn’t do something about the BQE. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The governor has been attempting to avoid political controversy sticking to him by assigning the most difficult problems to commissions and panels. Think back his sudden swooping in to present the L train shutdown. He assigned the problem to a panel who gave the alternative. Here are his current panels: Medicaid Redesign, Traffic Mobility, Climate Action, Digital Marketplace Worker Classification, and Public Campaign Finance. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

The story of how Governor Cuomo’s oversized ego made it impossible for Andy Byford to stay on a President of New York City Transit Authority. (Jim Dwyer for NY Times)

If you enjoy yelling at the MTA, they’ve added more pubic feedback meetings about their redesigned bus network in Queens. (Bill Parry for QNS)

After a horrifying case of animal abuse was uncovered at a Manhattan pet store, a bill in the state legislature would ban the sale of dogs, cats, and rabbits in pet stores across the state is gaining support. The bill would ban the sale from stores, but not from breeders. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

The city’s first suspected case of coronavirus is being investigated at NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue. This is no reason to panic. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A second and third case of coronavirus are already being investigated. Still no reason to panic. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

While coronavirus is on your mind, you should be worrying about the flu. his year we face a double-trouble scenario where it’s possible to get sick more than once during flu season. Two strains are hitting, so your chances of getting sick have doubled. The death toll from the flu this season is already at 10,000. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Where to eat sushi omakase for under $125. (Lorelei Yang for Eater)

“When you build high, folks will jump” were seven words included in an ArchDaily review of Vessel. Unfortunately on Saturday night, those words were proved true when a 19-year-old man committed suicide by jumping from the structure. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The city’s had a goal of planting 20,000 new trees every year, but has only managed to plant less than 1/3 of that lately. The Department of Parks and Recreation points to the rising costs of planting and maintaining trees. (Len Maniace for amNewYork Metro)

Hiram Monserrate was expelled from the state’s senate in 2009 for committing domestic assault in a horrifying story. In 2012 he plead guilty for illegally using money from a nonprofit he controlled to support a run for senate and has only paid back $8,400 of $79,000 in restitution for stealing public funds. He’s trying to make a political comeback. (Vivian Wang for NY Times)

Would you live in Bay Ridge? Localize lays out a case with eight reasons to move to Bay Ridge. (Localize Labs)

The story of Taste of Persia leaving Pizza Paradise just took a turn. Saeed Pourkay, chef and owner of Taste of Persia is accusing that Pizza Paradise stole his recipes shortly after his restaurant was forced out of Pizza Paradise. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

A major overhaul to the city’s property taxes could fundamentally shift the tax burden from low- and moderate-income homeowners to wealthy neighborhoods. A panel has been at work on the proposal since 2018, but mayors have attempted to tackle the subject for over a quarter century. The plan wouldn’t result in higher tax revenues. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons, Matthew Haag and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

The mayor is optimistic about getting the reforms done. “This is something I believe can and will be done during my administration.” (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams says if elected to be mayor, he would regularly carry a gun. (NY1)

What’s the history behind New York’s nickname “Gotham?” (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

A truck driver killed a Bushwick cyclist while making an illegal U-turn in Williamsburg on Jan. 30, marking the first cyclist death of 2020. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

There’s a video showing how Pedro Lopez was killed, and it is shocking. Despite killing Lopez, the driver of the truck was not issued a ticket and the NYPD’s comment about it was there was “no criminality suspected.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Department of Environmental Protection has reversed course and will fill the Jerome Park Reservoir basin in the Bronx. Previously the plan was to keep the basin empty. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Friday night’s “FTP” protests called for free public transit, an end to the harassment of the homeless, vendors and musicians in the subways, and full accessibility for people of all physical abilities throughout the transit system. The protest gathered at Grand Central Terminal at 5pm to maximally disrupt the evening commute and spread out from there. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

The Meatball Shop’s Lower East Side flagship location will be closing this weekend. (Bowery Boogie)

The best restaurants in Sunset Park. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)