The Briefly for December 29 – 30, 2020 – The “Penn Station, A Little Less Terrible” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The stimulus bill, the MTA looks for new ways to raise money, the post-Christmas Covid-19 spike is here, frozen NYC dinners, and more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 39˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Photos: Up close with the New Year’s Eve ball. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

With the stimulus bill passing, here’s what you need to know about the additional weekly $300 for unemployed workers. (Lauren Costantino for The City)

Buildings in the city are being graded like restaurants, the building I live in got a C, but almost half of the city’s buildings were given Ds and Fs. There’s no punishment for bad grades until 2024. (Lydia McMullen-Laird for Gothamist)

Video: The entire length of Broadway on an E-Scooter. (ActionKid)

Apartment Lust: This one-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village is nice but its best feature is its pricetag under one million dollars. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

It’s a great week to look for a dog or cat to add to your life. Patch highlights some dogs and cats available, including Petunia, the super affectionate lap cat. (Patch)

The new Moynihan Train Hall at Penn Station is set to open on January 1. Penn Station will still be a terrible nightmare, but with one nice area, available by a tunnel. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Half of the MTA’s budget comes from fares and tolls and the state is waking up to the idea that maybe that’s not a great idea, which is why we’re getting ideas like taxing packages or raising gas taxes from the state. (Jose Martinez for The City)

If you’ve wondered how some of the city’s restaurants’ outdoor structures are possibly legal, you have the SLA’s unclear regulations and the city’s lack of enforcement to thank. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Video: Say hello to the city’s asshole of the week, an unidentified woman who falsely accused a Black teenager of stealing her iPhone in the lobby of the Arlo Hotel. Her phone was found in an Uber later. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

There’s a new Pastrami Queen location on the Upper West Side. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A look into what arts groups are doing to keep itself afloat through gala season. (Robin Pogrebin for NY Times)

The post-Christmas Covid-19 spike is here. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Healthcare providers who violate the law by distributing the coronavirus vaccine could lose their license, be fined up to $1 million, and face possible prison time, under a new executive order from Governor Cuomo. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Interview: The staff of Arlene’s Grocery on the struggles to exist through the pandemic. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

RIP Betty Campbell-Adams, founder of founded Lloyd’s Carrot Cake in the Bronx. (Alex Vadukul for NY Times)

Wanna make yourself hungry for bucatini? (It’s the pasta that looks like spaghetti, but it’s hollow). Read about the bizarre bucatini shortage of 2020. (Rachel Handler for Grub Street)

Given up on dinner? Here are 10 frozen options from NYC restaurants to upgrade your lazy dinners. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 15-16, 2020 – The “President of NYC Buses?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The city’s new Covid-19 restrictions, the Brooklyn Cyclones are expanding, Pearl River Mark expands, a new RBG mural, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 60˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.

The CDC updated its mask guidance to explicitly say that masks help prevent the spread of disease by protecting people in the mask wearer’s vicinity, but wearing a mask will also help prevent you from contracting Covid-19. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The state is implementing new rules on the city in light of the rise in Covid-19 cases. Indoor and outdoor dining, along with gyms, will close at 10 pm and Indoor and outdoor gatherings in private will be limited to 10 people. These are the three vectors for spread, according to the state’s contact tracers. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The protected Crescent St bike lane in Astoria was finished last month to complaints from cyclists that it didn’t provide adequate protection. This week, a scooter rider was killed by a delivery truck driver, making it the 205th person to be killed on city streets this year, up from 185 last year. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Speaking of protected bike lanes, there has been a car parking in the 4th Ave protected bike lane in Brooklyn for at least four months. The protected bike lane is literally painted around this car. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Interview: MTA Bus President Craig Cipriano on a fully electric fleet, what the MTA would do with funding from a Biden administration, and wait, there’s a bus president? (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Where to pre-order Thanksgiving pies in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Congressional race for the 11th congressional district is over with Max Rose conceding to Nicole Malliotakis, who will go on to represent a portion of Brooklyn and all of Staten Island in the House of Representatives. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

While the Staten Island Yankees are dead, the Brooklyn Cyclones have received an upgrade from the Mets. The team will become a full-season High-A team, meaning more games in Coney Island from April through September. (Jim Dolan for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The city is set to launch a pilot program next year that will see healthcare professionals responding to people suffering a mental health crisis instead of the NYPD. The pilot will start in two yet to be named communities. (Joe Jurado for The Root)

Starting December 3 through March 4, you can catch a monthly light show projected onto the side of the Manhattan Bridge. The installations are part of the LIGHT YEAR project and will be viewable online because who the hell knows when this pandemic will ever end. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The lawsuit seeking to expand indoor dining from 25% capacity to 50% capacity was thrown out. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Photo: A new mural of Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the corner of 1st and 11th. This replaces the Shepard Fairey “Rise Above” mural. (@ellestreetart)

The top 100 albums of the year, from Williamsburg’s Rough Trade. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Farewell to The Creek & The Cave, the comedy club in Long Island City open for 14 years, forced closed bt the pandemic. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

On Tuesday I was worried about a cold being something worse and found out what all people looking to get tested have discovered, with the rise in cases in NYC, long lines for testing have returned. I tested negative. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

This is the same Staten Island that is now NYC’s epicenter for Covid-19. Or as the Times puts it “Staten Island has bristled at coronavirus restrictions, but now has the highest positive test rate in the city,” which is the most inappropriate use of the word “but” in the history of the Times. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Alexandra E. Petri for NY Times)

This week Dr. Anthony Fauci was honored by Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams for being a Covid-19 Hero. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Inside the city’s billion-dollar PPE bungle. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Attention Upper West Siders with dogs: don’t use the Museum of Natural History’s fenced off as a dog toilet. The museum is adjacent to a dog run and across the street from Central Park. (I Love the Upper West Side)

No matter what side you land on in the Industry City rezoning, the debate over the plan’s merits made clear that our Sunset Park community is in dire need of new housing — especially affordable units.
-Nelson Santana, Without Industry City rezoning, Sunset Parks needs affordable housing to stop displacement, for Brooklyn Paper

Marseille and Nizza in Hell’s Kitchen are giving actors a break and allowing them to eat now and pay whenever they’re able to again. (NY1)

Pearl River Mart is expanding beyond its original concept as a department store. The Pearl River Mart Foods is now open at the Chelsea Market, a market devoted to Ascian foods. (Roger Clark for NY1)

A look at the city’s manufacturing industry and what businesses are doing to stay relevant and in NYC. (Greg David for The City)

It is sad to see how deep this cowardice goes.” -AOC on Republicans refusing to acknowledge Biden’s victory. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

RIP Pearl Chin, founder of the Upper West Side’s Knitty City. (Alex Vadukul for NY Times)

Two years after the Civilian Complaint Review Board announced that it would begin to investigate police sexual misconduct, the CCRB is starting the process again and seeking public comment on new rules that allow it to probe sexual misconduct claims against the NYPD. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

The unmasking of “Clouseau” set us back, not only in the relationship between the NYPD and the community but within the department itself. The NYPD is one of the most diverse police departments in the country, with over 50 percent of its members being non-white. It should come as no surprise that members of the NYPD experience racism and sexism, just like the citizens they protect.
-Berby St. Fort and Eric Adams, a ranking member of the NYPD and the Brooklyn borough president, Time for NYPD to have a reckoning over equality within the ranks, for Brooklyn Paper

The restaurant rent crisis is continuing, with 88% of restaurants and bars unable to make rent in October. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Brian Maiorana was ordered heled without bail for threatening violence against people celebrating the election results and also violating restrictions imposed against him as a registered sex offender. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Where to eat in Williamsburg right now. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 20-21, 2020 – The “Don’t Call This A Staycation” Sunday Edition

Sunday’s NYC news digest: A potpourri of news, a RBG statue, City Hall’s annual report card, what we miss from pre-pandemic NYC, how to pack an emergency bag, and more

Today – Low: 52˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be honored with a statue in Brooklyn. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

NYC’s legal community reflects on RBG’s life and work. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It feels insulting for for the city to push an advertising campaign that New Yorkers should “staycation” in New York City. Turns out when you remove the tourists from midtown, we still hate midtown. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has issued exactly zero summonses for mask non-compliance. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The anatomy of an NYC protest. Which role do you play? (Juliana Kim and Simbarashe Cha for NY Times)

New York City’s school reopening plans are still missing a key ingredient: enough teachers. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Parents and students react to the city’s constant waffling about the start of the school year. This feels like trying to read all of your summer reading in the weekend before school starts. (Sophia Chang, Gwynne Hogan, Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

The de Blasio administration released a 420-page document tracking City Hall operations for the last year. Murders are up. Juvenile arrests are up. Violent incidents in jails are up while population is down. The “excess death” rate” suggests the death toll from Covid-19 might be well over 50,000. NYPD response times are up. Response times for emergency complaints in NYCHA buildings is up. The homeless population increased. The good news? Rat complaints are down and there were new bike lanes built. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The report “Discipline in the NYPD 2019” outlines, but doesn’t detail, 339 cases in which officers faced departmental charges. Cops pleaded or were found guilty in 322 of those cases. Only 27 lost their jobs. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Murderinos: Look no further than your own backyard. The untold story of the Tompkins Square murder. (David Swanson for Village Voice from 1989)

Businesses around Yankee Stadium held a rally Thursday afternoon demanding that the city renegotiate the lease and tax deal that Yankee management worked out to stay in the Bronx under the Bloomberg administration, claiming that extra money obtained through the negotiation could help keep businesses surrounding the stadium stay afloat until fans are able to return to the stadium. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The 2020 fall foliage map. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

At the crossroads of art and commerce is the controversy at the Whitney, who canceled an exhibition of arresting responses to the pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests after artists of color criticized the Whitney for acquiring their work without consent and through discount sales. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

A look at how Governors Island could become a climate center for the city. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The mayor, possibly unaware that he is the mayor, made public comments about how outdoor dining “should become permanent.” Will he walk the walk or just talk the talk? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The pandemic tax? City Council voted in favor of giving restaurants the option to add a 10% charge to bills as an economic recovery support measure. The mayor supports the bill and once he signs it, it will be in effect immediately until indoor dining returns to full capacity. I guess the city’s response to us asking it to help restaurants is “help them yourself.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

If the last few years have seen the food world grapple with systemic issues like pay disparities, culinary credit, tipping, and harassment from either big-time chefs or everyday customers, the poorly regulated return of indoor dining — during a deadly pandemic, no less — feels like a middle finger to hospitality workers.
-Ryan Sutton, chief food critic for Eater, NYC’s Indoor Dining Comeback Fails Restaurant Workers. Here’s Why. for Eater

The city’s first store dedicated to Covid-19 essentials opened in Herald Square. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new report from Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office found that 57 percent of dogs tested at city-run shelters developed respiratory disease during their stays, among other troubling findings. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD is working with the Trump administration to blame violent crime on bail reform by bringing federal charges instead of local charges against people suspected of involvement in shootings. The NYPD’s own data shows a lack of a link between bail reform and the increase in violent crime, but the truth has never stopped the NYPD of Trump administration before. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The mayor announced he will force his staff to take an unpaid one-week furlough between October 2020 and March 2021 to save money. It will save under a million dollars. The mayor is currently looking for a billion dollars of savings or will lay off 22,000 city employees. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Wanna buy a T. rex skeleton? Stan, the T. rex, is up for auction on October 6 at Christie’s. (Zachary Smalls for NY Times)

Photos: Sunnyside has become the home of fairies. No, really. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Where to eat outside in Prospect Heights. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

A love letter to the 1993 Super Mario Bros movie, a movie about two brothers from Brooklyn. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

Indoor pools will be able to open on September 30 at 33% capacity. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Apartment Porn: A $16.5 million Upper East Side townhouse with a miniature pool and a roof garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

More than 170 New York City transit workers have been harassed or assaulted for asking passengers to wear masks. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

38 glorious Chinese restaurants open right now. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It’s not uncommon to see people sitting outside libraries in an attempt to use the free wifi. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Columbia’s marching band disbanded itself for “a history riddled with offensive behavior.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

Bankruptcy will not stop New York Sports Clubs from charging you your monthly fee. The state attorney general’s office is investigating. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Trick or treating is nor canceled this year, ensuring the scariest Halloween of all time. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There will be no snow days at all this year, as classes will move to remote learning in case of snow. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

Dante in Greenwich Village, voted world’s best bar by Time Out) is now offering canned cocktails. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

In praise of Gloria’s Caribbean, a Crown Heights mainstay. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s real estate market has been hotter than Manhattan’s, pre- and post-pandemic. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork Metro)

Time Out looks back to the 10 things we miss the most about the Before Times in NYC. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: “Doggy Bags” brings giant dog sculptures to the Garment District. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How to pack an emergency bag. Just in case. (A. C. Shilton for NY Times)

NYC’s most anticipated restaurants openings of fall 2020. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)