The Briefly for July 21, 2020 – The “Don’t Make Me Turn This Car Around” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Night and weekend subway construction returns next month, Domino Park gets private security, the new owner of Ample Hills, and more

Today – Low: 77˚ High: 89˚
Humid throughout the day.

Video: Walking through Occupy City Hall. (Action Kid)

Apartment Porn: A $4 million townhouse in Windsor Terrace with an inground saltwater pool. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Reducing service, slashing the transit workforce, scrapping planned infrastructure improvements, raising tolls beyond scheduled increases, and some of the other “hard choices no matter what happens” at the MTA over the next few years with a projected $16 billion loss. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The pandemic is making more New Yorkers consider buying cars. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork Metro)

There’s never been a better time to have contactless payment on the subways. OMNY is available throughout the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

It feels like we haven’t heard anything about subway closures for construction in forever, but here we are. The F line’s Rutgers Tube, which connects Brooklyn and Manhattan, will close nights and weekends starting in August through the spring to finish Hurricane Sandy repairs and fortification. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Governor Cuomo is going full-on “don’t make me turn this car around” when it comes to bar and restaurant openings. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Mayor de Blasio saw the video of a homeless man being punched in the face by an NYPD and decided that everyone and no one is to blame for the situation continuing his longstanding tradition of never taking a stand on anything and upsetting everyone on every side of every situation. A true ally to nobody. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Pulling the enforcement of the city’s Open Streets away from the NYPD and asking community partners to take over was supposed to make things easier. Now, the NYPD are harassing volunteers. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Apparently asking that the NYPD stop beating and killing New Yorkers is too much to ask if you’re NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea. (Joe Jurado for The Root)

“The NYPD demands accountability from everyone but themselves. The Department refuses to require personnel to attend virtual misconduct hearings or provide body camera footage to investigators. Officers without masks beat masked demonstrators on video, after weeks of sometimes-violent mask-wearing enforcement, then insisted that more cops were essential for public safety.”
– Maryanne Kaishian, senior policy counsel at Brooklyn Defender Services, Cops continue misinformation campaign to smear policies they don’t like for Brooklyn Eagle

The widely cited and incorrect talking point of a politician who is trying to convince their constituents that using tax dollars to pay for a sports stadium is beneficial for the neighborhood. The Yankees received $1.186 billion in public money and tax breaks to build their new stadium in 2009. Eleven years later, the Yankees pay no property taxes on an estimated $5 billion of city-owned land, the Bronx will not see any baseball fans in 2020, and the neighborhood surrounding Yankee stadium is economically dying, with the average merchant behind on rent to the tune of $60,000. This year, the Yankees signed pitched Gerrit Cole for $324 million. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

Deep in the city’s budget is 4.1 million dedicated to supporting people involved in the sex trade, but what does that even mean? (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

An interview with Brian Nagy, an NYC teacher in the school system’s remote teaching pilot program that says remote learning may, in some form, be here to stay. (Gabrielle Birkner for Chalkbeat)

What to expect in phase four. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

The FDNY had to save two people whose inflatable swan drifted into the East River and began sinking. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Jerry Wolkoff, the man best known as the developer that demolished 5Pointz. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The 7 best hikes near New York City. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

RIP Nina Kapur, CBS2 reporter who died after a moped crash in Manhattan. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Interview: Michael Zapata, the new owner of Ample Hills on why a guy who manufactures precision lasers in Oregon just bought an ice cream company in Brooklyn. (Joshua David Stein for Grub Street)

Apartment Porn: A $3.5 million townhouse with an “enchanted garden” backyard, six fireplaces, and private parking. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Sheldon Silver, the former New York State Assembly speaker, is going to prison for 78 months after being convicted on corruption charges. (Benjamin Weiser and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Why the hell does Domino Park, a public space, have private security guards posted at its entrances? (Ben Weiss for Greenpointers)

Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group restaurants are ending their move towards no-tipping policies. Meyer believes tipping contributes to inequitable pay, wage instability, and other problems. He says he’s ending the policies because “guests want to tip generously right now.” That’s extending a lot of trust, considering it’s not his income he’s making policies about. (Julia Moskin for NY Times)

The president is threatening to send federal agents to the city to “keep this city safe.” We have heard some awful ideas this year, each dumber than the last, but I can’t ever imagine this ending well. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The William Vale’s pool is now open to the public with the price tag starting at a hefty $75 for a few hours and going up to $500 for two people. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Check out this wonderful pen and ink cityscape from artist Kaylie Fairclough. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A call for Mayor de Blasio to shut off the lights so the city can see the comet Neowise. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Wait times for results for Covid-19 tests across the city are slipping. The free tests available at the city’s publicly run hospital network are beyond the advertised 3-5 days and are drifting towards the two-week territory. (Anastassia Gliadkovskaya for The City)

Attention mallrats: Indoor malls are still closed. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

A deeper look at the temporary hospital that was built at U.S.T.A. Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, which cost $52 and treated 79 patients. (Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

Where to eat dim sum outdoors in Chinatown. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for May 8, 2020 – The “Do We Really Need A Polar Vortex Right Now?” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD continues to be the NYPD while enforcing social distancing, the state’s eviction moratorium continues through August, 35 places for dessert, & more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 56˚
Rain starting in the afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 40˚ High: 61˚

What’s that purple light? The Upper West Side has a minor mystery on its hands. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

The eventual design of the new 15 Penn Plaza has changed a few times over the years, and it’s changed again, to a much more boring design. (Vanessa Londono for New York YIMBY)

Slowly, the eyesores in Soho that were boarding up stores are becoming art installations. The Soho Bloomingdales’s boarded up windows is now a canvas for Marco Santini. On one hand, this is better than boarded up windows, on the other hand, will a concentration of street art in Soho begin to become an attraction for people when no one should be gathering together? (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Here are two words you absolutely don’t want to hear in the middle of May: Polar Vortex. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Apartment Porn: 10 jaw-dropping apartments you can tour from your couch. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Los Muralistas de El Puente is filling the walls of a Domino Park in Williamsburg with painted portraits of Brooklyn’s essential workers. You can find the collective’s portraits near the South 4th St entrance near River St. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

The city is looking to administer 140,000 Covid-19 antibody tests to “everyday New Yorkers” in the coming weeks in addition to 140,000 tests for essential workers, in hopes of understanding the spread of the virus. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

In the age of only pickup or delivery, Seamless and other delivery apps are holding the city’s restaurants hostage. Use the apps to look at a restaurant’s menu and then call the restaurant using the phone number listed in Google Maps. How much of an impact is this making on restaurants? The example used in the article is on a $131 order, the restaurant gives up $35 to Grubhub. (Rebecca Ibarra for Gothamist)

Video: 13 NYC islands you might not know about. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Mini-Documentary: The history of the Coney Island Cyclone Roller Coaster. (Matt Coneybeare or Viewing NYC)

The state’s moratorium on evictions was extended by Governor Cuomo until August. He also banned late fees and ordered that security deposits can be used as rent payments. The governor is not acting on calls to cancel rent, essentially kicking the can down the road with this executive order. For landlords, he told them to look to the federal government for relief. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mister Softee trucks seem like an awful idea if you’re trying to avoid touching other people, but you can never escape the Mister Softee jingle, not even during an epidemic. Did you know the Mister Softee song has lyrics? (Emmo Orlow for Time Out)

Video: NYPD officers making another violent arrest, including punching bystanders while not wearing masks themselves. (East New York News)

Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez is investigating multiple “disturbing” violent arrests in Brooklyn, weighing options to bring criminal charges against cops or issue recommendations for disciplinary measures. Hell will freeze over before I believe the city will bring charges against an NYPD officer. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

Of the 79 people who were issued tickets for jaywalking in the first three months of 2020, only one person was identified as white, while 78 were listed as black or Hispanic. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

35 of the 40 people arrested for social distancing are black. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

The mayor, with the worst possible take on this. Happy birthday, Mayor de Blasio. (@NYCMayor)

Earlier in the week, the NYPD’s labor union said that the NYPD shouldn’t be in charge of enforcing social distancing. Maybe they are incapable of not enforcing every law in the city without an overt racial bias. What should they be doing? Because their latest stroke of genius included shutting down one of the city’s few open streets so they an illegally park their vehicle to get bagels. All without wearing masks or gloves. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

SNL’s got another At Home episode this week, which they’re calling the “season finale.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Police are investigating the death of a woman who was found badly decomposed in Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem on Thursday morning. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Michael Halkias, owner of the Grand Prospect Hall. Halias was someone who was famous amongst New Yorker. His commercials for the Grand Prospect Hall are the things of legend. Thank you for making all our dreams come true. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The city also lost Jimmy Glenn, boxing legend and owner of Times Square dive bar Jimmy’s Corner. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Farewell Gem Spa, which will not open after the pandemic is over. (EV Grieve)

The American Museum Of Natural History announced the museum will cut about 20 percent of its workforce, around 450 out of approximately 1,100 employees. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

With graduation ceremonies canceled, high schools are having to get creative. (Elizabeth A. Harris for NY Times)

Only four people know the recipe for Gem Spa’s famous egg creams, here are a few recipes for egg creams so you can raise a toast to Gem Spa. (Nicole Schnitzler for Edible Brooklyn)

With Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt returning next week (and me hosting a Kimmy Schmidt edition of Pop Culture Trivia on Wednesday night), let’s explore Tina Fey and Ellie Kempner’s NYC connections. (Michele Petry for Street Easy)

Mayor de Blasio is expected to announce that he is stripping control of Covid-19 tracing away from the Health Department and giving it to Health and Hospitals which runs the city’s public hospitals, breaking with decades of precedent. (J. David Goodman, William K. Rashbaum and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

CUNY Chancellor Félix Matos Rodríguez says federal aid is crucial to determine the university’s budget for next year and hasn’t made a decision about a tuition hike yet. (Juan Manuel Benitez for NY1)

35 dessert destinations serving cake, cookies, and treats. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

Thank you to Katie for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 22, 2019 – The “Advertisements on Advertisements” Edition

A bloody night in Queens and Brooklyn, the mayor wants to save Di Fara, the governor invites him to pay their taxes, the best ice cream sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos: Take a look inside the Watchtower’s old headquarters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Elyse Marks is not your average restoration architect and an Instagram account full of photos repelling off of some of the city’s more well-known buildings proves it. (Untapped Cities)

What to see in the city’s art galleries right now. (NY Times)

The landmarked Long Island City Pepsi-Cola sign is now brought to you by JetBlue. (amNY)

Tuesday night was a bloody one in Queens and Brooklyn, with four unrelated shootings resulting in five homicides. Gun violence is up over 25% from last year. (Gothamist)

A report by Coalition for the Homeless shows the city’s housing plan is actually making the city’s homelessness problem worse. (Curbed)

“New Yorkers are very, very spoiled,” Mr. Toma said, seated in the driver’s seat of a black Rolls-Royce Wraith, as he waited for the club to fill. (NY Times)

Harvey Weinstein wants his rape trial moved out of New York City because of the city’s “inflammatory press coverage.” (Gothamist)

The quarter-billion-dollar overhaul of the Grand Central Shuttle has begun. (amNY)

An 11-year-old border-terrier mix and very good boy named Theo was stolen from outside a grocery store in Williamsburg on Monday night. Theo is suffering from arthritis, liver issues, tumors, and more, but one thing he won’t have to worry about is being away from home because he was reunited with his human on Wednesday. (Brooklyn Paper)

The atmosphere is “salon-like” in this “hidden gem” where women swap makeup tips and the lighting is good and there is open space. Where is this? Apparently, it’s the second-floor women’s bathroom at the Port Authority Bus Terminal. (NY Times)

The last of the pay-by-the-hour hotel to the history of the New Victory Theater, 10 seedy remnants of old Times Square you can still see today. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the ways landlords are trying to get around the new rent reform laws in order to screw you. (The Real Deal)

Legendary pizzeria Di Fara was seized by the state for owing $167k in taxes dating back to 2014. The mayor responded by saying he’s “ready to do anything I can to get them reopened.” (Grub Street)

“Now, if he wants to pay the $200,000 on behalf of the pizza place, he can do that.” -Governor Cuomo (amNY)

Mystery solved. The staff of Dean & Deluca’s says the store is so empty because they are going through a renovation, but will stay open as a coffee shop during the renovation. (Gothamist)

Lyft is partnering with GrowNYC and BMS Family Health and Wellness Centers to offer discounted rides to low-income New Yorkers in Brownsville to improve access to healthy food options at the green and farmer’s markets and Project EATS. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Andrew Herman is illustrating every Mets home game this season. (New York Cliche)

The driver whose recklessness lead to the death of cyclist Jose Alzorriz on Coney Island Avenue is facing charges of manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, vehicular assault, and reckless endangerment. Mirza Baig, 18, is one of the few drivers facing prison after killing a cyclist or pedestrian. (Streetsblog)

The city has lowered the requirements necessary to enter its affordable housing lotteries, lessening barriers that discourage undocumented immigrants from applying. (LIC Post)

There’s a GoFundMe for just about anything, including one for fired NYPD officer Daniel “Chokehold” Pantaleo. (Patch)

10 things you absolutely have to do in NYC before summer ends. (Time Out)

If you’ve ever been anywhere near Battery Park, you know the routine of ignoring the aggressive ticket sellers for trips around the Statue of Liberty. The ticket sellers are confusing at best and deceptive at worst. The city has terminated any docking permits to companies who accept tickets sold by street vendors. (Curbed)

The Fraunces Tavern, the oldest building in Manhattan, will celebrate its 300th anniversary with a party on October 1. (amNY)

The NYPD sergeant at the scene where Eric Garner was killed will not face a trial for her role in his death. Instead, Sgt. Kizzy Adonis will lose 20 vacation days. Eric Garner’s mother said the NYPD is “actively participating in an ongoing cover-up” and the police union that represents Adonis said she was “scapegoated.” (Patch)

If you go to Union Hall in Park Slope in September or October, there’s a 1/6 chance that David Cross will be performing. He’s announced 10 dates in the two months where he’ll be testing out new material on stage. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Video: Mike Chen of Strictly Dumpling takes you on a tour of his four favorite Brooklyn pizzerias. Di Fara was not on the list. (Viewing NYC)

Meet the subway’s “happiest conductor.” (Gothamist)

The mayor was a laughing stock in Iowa, but for once it wasn’t his polling numbers or debate performances. (Patch)

If you must get caught in a storm (that was me walking home from the subway last night before hosting John Trivialta at Parklife), Domino Park in Williamsburg is, at the very least, picturesque before the rain comes down. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Democrat councilman Andy King was charged by the Standards and Ethics Committee with harassment, disorderly conduct, conflict of interest violations and retaliation, from Minority Leader and Republican Steven Matteo. Specific details of the allegations were not disclosed. (amNY)

The best ice-cream sandwiches in the city, ranked. (Grub Street)