The Briefly for August 12, 2019 – The “LaGuardia Airport: A Hellhole of Hellholes” Edition

Zombie homes, free subways and buses on holidays, the ultra-rich New Yorkers funding Trump’s campaign, the Islanders are leaving Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are extensive, double-check the trains before staying out late. (Subway Weekender)

The second phase of the Hudson Yards construction involves something pretty common to NYC: delays from the MTA. (6sqft)

A history, explanation, and timeline of the LaGuardia construction. (amNY)

Saying LaGuardia Airport sucks in 2019 is underselling the sheer nightmare that is trying to escape the city from an airport where 90% of people are using private transportation to get to. Thursday’s disaster scenario of people walking on the highways and ramps to catch their flights was blamed on it being of the 45 peak travel days for the summer. Between the MTA’s stellar track record for buses, the Port Authority’s control of the airport, the DOT’s control of the roads and individual airlines’ construction on terminals, this is a problem that will persist for years.

Where’s the governor on all of this? He’s called this whole mess “unavoidable,” while also taking no specific action to make traveling to the airport any less hellish. If you’re traveling on any of the 19 “peak” days in August, the Port Authority suggests leaving multiple hours earlier to account for the travel disaster waiting for you. (Gothamist)

The “zombie homes” in Sheepshead bay are becoming a real problem for the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York state has a case against ExxonMobil for misleading its shareholders by lying about knowledge of climate change as early as 1977, and now the state has caught ExxonMobil attempting to intimidate the witnesses. Opening statements are scheduled for October 23. (Inside Climate News)

If you’re the type of person who hates having money and loves martinis, maybe The Algonquin Hotel’s $10,000 martini is for you, which comes with a diamond ring. (Untapped Cities)

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade replaced animals from the Central Park Zoo with balloons in 1927. The company turned to Greenwich Villager Tony Sarg to create the first iconic balloons for the parade. (GVSHP)

Incomplete data and sporadic surveys make measuring storefront vacancies difficult, but a study from the Department of City Planning shows the problem doesn’t exist everywhere in the city. Jackson Heights has the lowest vacancy rate of the areas surveyed at 5.1% compared to Canal Street, which is at 25.9%. (Curbed)

The history of how a natural gas pipeline turned into a 30-mile offshore windfarm. (The Indypendent)

This week’s forced restaurant closures do not disappoint with two different places being closed by the Department of Health, both scoring over 100 violation points in the process. (Patch)

The worry over rentable Revel scooters in Brooklyn and Queens is just that, worry. The company’s mission enjoys rare support from both the Department of Transportation’s Polly Trottenberg and Transportation Alternatives, and if they proved to be dangerous, you’d be reading about the danger they pose to pedestrians in The Briefly on a regular basis. (NY Times)

These are the city’s top high schools. (Patch)

The city is transforming two East Harlem lots into all below-market-rate apartments with 30% set aside for the homeless as part of the East Harlem Housing Plan. (Curbed)

Does no one ride the subways on major holidays because the MTA cuts service or does the MTA cut service because no one rides the subways on holidays? City Councilmember Justin Brannan will propose a non-binding resolution to request the MTA offer free subway and bus service during New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day in a similar fashion to how parking meters are suspended on those days. The MTA is, of course, against anything that would promote more people to take the train or buses. (6sqft)

85% of people stopped for mass transit fare evasion are black or Latinx, which echoes the unmistakable racist enforcement of stop and frisk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Islanders are getting a permanent home in Belmont Park with a 19,000 seat arena for the team is dead last when it comes to attendance figures for the last two seasons. (QNS)

A list of the 1% of the 1% of New York City that is fueling Trump’s reelection campaign. Of course, the city’s worst musician and Knicks owner James Dolan is on the list. (Gothamist)

The condo board of 25 Central Park West is asking neighbor buildings for money to continue to fight their lawsuit against a protected bike lane that could have saved the life of cyclist Madison Lyden. (Streetsblog)

Mike Chen is testing the six top burgers in the city, which will come out ahead? (Viewing NYC)

Already tired of the 2020 primary race among Democrats? Here is a list of possible 2021 hopefuls for NYC mayor. (amNY)

As Sunset Park becomes more popular thanks to a gentrifying neighborhood and Industry City, Third Avenue’s dangers become more pronounced. The death of Em Samolewicz is one of eight fatalities and 2,000 injuries on Third Ave since 2011. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A judge issued a stay and once again blocked the 14th St busway from becoming a reality. Every single headline about this story has used some variation of the phrase “slams brakes on” like it was legally mandated. (Downtown Express)

29% of the 15,500 structural components at subway stations were found to be worn or damaged, and that number is up since 2012. Comforting, right? (amNY)

Anti-ICE protestors shut down the West Side Highway at 26th St on Saturday for an hour. (Splinter)

Were you among the 10,253 people treated by the FDNY between 2011 and 2018 whose personal information, including social security number, was accidentally left on a hard drive and misplaced? (amNY)

The New York Philharmonic’s Free Fridays are returning, giving away tickets to people between 13 and 26 with an online reservation system. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jeffrey Epstein is dead of an apparent suicide, but the investigation into his crimes is not. The FBI and prosecutors will turn their attention to his accomplices. (NY Times)

The city’s 19th cyclist was killed by a teenage driver on Sunday in Midwood. (Brooklyn Paper)

City Hall Park is now adorned by “Estructuras Monumentales“, works by 104-year-old local artist Carmen Herrera and will be on display through November 8. (Downtown Express)

A deep look into Corey Johnson’s plans to kill the city’s car culture. (Gotham Gazette)

35 solid happy hours. (Eater)

The Briefly for October 18, 2018 – The “This Will Make the L Train Shutdown Look Easy” Edition

The MTA has not properly maintained the subways, NYC’s haunted history, the mayor is accused of selective animal-cruelty enforcement, this November’s election is going to be confusing, and more.

The L train is not running between Broadway Junction and 8th 8 Ave, from 10:45 pm until 5 a.m. every weekday until November 30. The MTA is also reducing service to one train every 12 minutes between Myrtyle-Wckoff and Rockaway Parkway from 11am to 3pm. Add that to the L not running at all on the weekends during October. Good lord. (Gothamist)

According to the Department of Transportation commissioner Polly Tottenberg, the challenge the impending BQE construction poses to the city “makes the L train look like a piece of cake.” Oh, cool.

15 ways to celebrate Halloween. (Untapped Cities)

Activists are accusing Mayor de Blasio of refusing to enforce animal-cruelty laws against Orthodox Jews who ritually slaughter tens of thousands of chickens Brooklyn streets ahead of Yom Kippur. The Alliance to End Chickens as Kaproros wants to show in court that the selective enforcement favors a particular class. (NY Post)

November 6’s election ballots will be two pages for the first time which is expected to cause multiple logistics issues at polling locations throughout the city. Uh oh. (Bklyner)

A sample election ballot.

Could one way to reduce the burden on the subway system be lowering the cost of in-city trips on the LIRR and Metro-North to subway fares? (Curbed)

LA chef Ilan Hall is back in NYC with Ramen Hood, a pop-up vegan noodle bar at the Chef’s Club in SoHo. (Gothamist)

Speaking of challenges Tottenberg also said “I’m the first to admit we have a long way to go.” when talking about parking placard abuse. She’s recommending automatic license plate readers, which likely won’t be a hit with civil liberties groups. (NY Post)

Three Crown Heights parks will see their first improvements in 20 to 30 years. It’s a double edged sword, as investments in these parks could result in higher rents and sale prices in the already fragile neighborhood. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Ferry buffs, sorry to see that Hurricane Michael forced a delay in the delivery of new boats for the Staten Island Ferry. The first boat was opting in late 2019 and there is no new delivery date yet. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo is actually praising Mayor de Blasio. Cuomo is joining de Blasio in calling for a boycott of NY1 by any state officials over an ongoing strike by the electrical workers union. (NY Post)

A new audit of the MTA between 2015 and 2017 shows, surprise surprise, the MTA has not properly maintained the system. 76% of inspections are not completed on time and thousands of inspections never happened at all. (NY Post)

Low-level offenders (disorderly conduct, littering, drinking alcohol in public) with outstanding warrants have the opportunity to clear their record in Woodside on Saturday. (Sunnyside Post)

Trump Place at 200 Riverside Blvd will now be known as…200 Riverside Blvd. The building is the latest of many in Manhattan to dump Trump signage due to the actions of our current president. (NY Times)

The former NYPD detective on the Harvey Weinstein case allegedly told one of his victims that she could delete text messages from her phones before turning them over to prosecutors. She didn’t, but that sounds shady to say the least. (Gothamist)

The baby Trump balloon is making its way to the city for the Impeachment Parade on October 27. (amNY)

10 spots that will reveal the city’s haunted history. (6sqft)


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The Briefly for October 11, 2018 – Does the Penn Station Problem Have a Solution?

The MTA is ready to give up on new ideas, an alpaca roamed around Brooklyn, the Papaya King expands his kingdom, NYCHA is out of money, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

“This is really our last, best shot at getting this right.” Will this be the time for Penn Station’s renaissance or will it continue to be the crowded hellhole that we all know and loathe?

If you don’t vote, you are doubling the value of someone else’s vote. (kottke.org) Did you know you can register to vote at a LinkNYC kiosk? (The Brooklyn Reader) Voter registration closes on Friday for the November 6 election.

Remember Pastagram, the restaurant specifically made to look good in photos? Turns out the food isn’t terribly photogenic. (NY Post)

He’s the Papaya King, we just live in his kingdom. (Eater)

The Morgan is celebrating 200 years of Frankenstein (and his monster) with “It’s Alive! Frankenstein at 200,” with parts of the original manuscript, movie memorabilia, the original Fuseli painting that inspired the story and more. (amNY)

The NYPD arrested Nigel Kennedy, a self-proclaimed spiritual leader, on several charges of rape and sexual misconduct after who women accused him of drugging then during a “religious ceremony.” (BKLYNER)

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle’s original copper eagle found a new home in the Brooklyn Public Library. The library is having a naming contest for the eagle. Is Eagle McEagleface an option? (amNY)

Watching a loose alpaca in Borough Park is precisely what you need right now. (@jacobkornbluh)

The resources are not there to do the job” -Stanley Brezenoff, interim chairman of the NYCHA. Repairs are desperately needed and the funding isn’t available, leaving tens of thousands of New Yorkers in deteriorating conditions. (NY Post)

New York has a rich history of throwing on headphones and ignoring the world. (Gothamist)

18 iconic locations in 18 iconic films. (StreetEasy)

15 standout fast-casual restaurants in Midtown for your lunchtime chow downs. (Eater)

The MTA is opening a “transit tech lab,” because it seems that they’re ready to admit that they can’t our transit woes themselves. (6sqft)

Cellino & Barnes are having a “record year” despite their public feud and breakup. (NY Post)

“Candy Nation,” a series of 20 9-foot tall candy sculptures by French sculptor Laurence Jenkell, has landed in the Garment District as part of the 15th Annual Arts Festival. (Untapped Cities)

The DOT announced plans to redesign Northern Blvd after six traffic deaths in 2017 and four so far in 2018. (Curbed)

The MTA promises that during the L train shutdown, they will not shut down the subways below 14th St on the weekends. Let’s see if they stick to that. (Gothamist)

The restoration of the Truman Capote House in Brooklyn Heights is complete. (Brownstoner)

The 10 best places to see foliage in Central Park. (Untapped Cities)


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