The Briefly for November 21, 2019 – The “Raccoons Take Control, De Blasio’s MTA Influence Weakens” Edition

The best falafel, the city pays out $1 billion in lawsuits annually, Corey Johnson continues the tradition of playing politics with the budget, and more in today’s daily NYC digest.

Trash pandas rule the city’s parks at night, but now they are turning their little bandit-faced gaze towards becoming the kinds of the subterranean. Raccoon-related subway delays are up this year, way up. (Gothamist)

Let’s call it The Great Bell Blvd Oil Heist. The NYPD arrested Nigeme Rowe for stealing used oil from restaurants that put out the oil for recycling companies to be turned into biodiesel. (QNS)

The Daily News’ owners sold 25% of the company to the Tribune Company, the “destroyer of newspapers.” Sound promising. (Patch)

The city has paid $84.5 million annually to the victims of traffic violence caused by city employees in the Departments of Fire, Sanitation, Police, Transportation, and Parks. Add in all claims against the city? The number balloons to $1 billion. (Streetsblog)

The candy vendor arrested in a Harlem subway station last week plans to sue the city for $5 million for excessive force used by the four police officers who arrested him. (amNewYork)

The Queens DA will release its internal “credibility database” of cops who are suspected of lying in court. (Gothamist)

Are there enough places to buy coffee in NYC? Bandit is a new company that plans to open a coffee stand where you can buy a cup via their app with their eventual goal to be within a five minute walk from anyone who wants coffee. (Eater)

Broadway is Broadway, but Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway and smaller theaters far beyond still has a strong economical presence. Non-Broadway theater generates $584 million annually and employs 3,000 people according to a new study form the mayor’s office. (NY Times)

Five holiday decoration tips for small spaces, including the very sad “put branches in the shape of a tree on your wall.” (StreetEasy)

Lyft and the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) announced the formation of a new Equity Advisory Board for Citi Bike to discuss and evaluate Citi Bike’s equity strategy to better serve New York. (Curbed)

This look back at the history of 57th St starts with the quintessential Manhattan question: “Does anyone actually want to go to Midtown?” (Gothamist)

13 Brooklyn condos with the best waterfront views. (6sqft)

The case for ending free parking in NYC is getting stronger. (NY Times)

Here are the things that New Yorkers are looking for when they search for a new home. Here’s a hint: low crime and good light. (Localize Labs)

Add another name to the great fried chicken fight of 2019. From Philly, the latest contestant is Starliner in Bushwick. (Gothamist)

Evictions are down in Manhattan, Staten Island, Brooklyn, and Queens, but not in the Bronx according to a new report issued by NYU’s Furman Center. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The Times is searching for stories about your neighborhood bodega. (NY Times)

Is your regular hookup becoming “a thing?” Here’s where to go when you’re not sure that your friend with benefits might want to have the “what ARE we?” talk. (The Infatuation)

Mayor de Blasio’s influence over the MTA is diminishing as one of his appointees, Veronica Vanterpool, is resigning from the MTA’s board. Vanterpool was also the youngest board member at 44 and its only woman of color. (Politico)

The MTA’s automated bus-mounted camera ticketing system is coming to the 14th St busway and will be online on December 2 and for the first sixty days, drivers will only receive a warning. (Gothamist)

Ten city zip codes are among the United States’ most expensive when it comes to home prices at numbers 5 and 8, respectively. Tribeca and Hudson Square broke through to the top ten. (Patch)

It seems that as long as you say you “didn’t realize” you hit and killed someone with your car, the NYPD will absolve you of wrongdoing. (Streetsblog)

A second New Yorker has died due to a vaping-related illness. (Patch)

More than two dozen homes in Dyker Heights have begun their annual Christmas light transformation. (Brooklyn Paper)

In September of 2018, the Department of Sanitation begun parking garbage trucks overnight on 10th between 1st and 2nd, which quite honestly sucks for the people who live on that block. It took 14 months, but State Senator Brad Hoylman and State Assemblymember Deborah J. Glick have introduced a bill that will prevent the DSNY from parking on residential streets. As a result, the DSNY has decided to move its trucks to Pier 42 for the next three months. (EV Grieve)

Starting next year, some buildings in the city will be required to display a letter grade, similar to restaurants, showing how energy efficient they are. (NY Times)

Is Corey Johnson using the City Council’s budget to reward his allies and make political deals? Yes. Has this been common practice in the City Council for long before Corey Johnson because the speaker? Also yes. (Politico)

NYC needs more weird, like Mother Pigeon, the bird woman artist and animal rights advocate who makes acrylic pigeon sculptures and sets them up in Union Square. (Viewing NYC)

Inside a celebration of Fet Gede in Downtown Brooklyn, the Haitian voodoo Festival of the Dead. (NY Times)

The best falafel in NYC. (Grub Street)

Thank you to MG Ashdown for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 2, 2019 – The “Delayed Subways Are Literally Killing You” Weekend Edition

A highlight of the city’s beaches, the weekend subway delays, photos of children are in the NYPD’s facial recognition database and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Welcome to August, when everyone seems to leave the city.

Lots of reduced service this week on the subways, check before you go. (Subway Weekender)

Four residential towers slated for Two Bridges, the area between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges on the Manhattan side, was put on ice by a judge who declared the city did not have the right to bypass the usual zoning and approval process. (amNY)

There’s a piece of Broadway’s history sitting outside of 52 East 80th Street. Outside the brownstone, you’ll find a large limestone head of a Greco-Roman goddess. That head was a part of the original Zigfield Theater. (Untapped Cities)

Are subway delays deadly? In the long run, yes. The Social Science Research Council found a correlation between higher commute times and obesity and are linked to diabetes and heart conditions. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

You can take the mayor out of the city, but you can’t take the controversy away from the mayor. During this week’s debates, de Blasio was plagued with questions and protests over some of his greatest hits. (amNY)

Who is on the MTA board, which has the authority to raise prices and make service changes? If you guessed a bunch of rich, older, white suburbanites, you’d be right. The median household income for a board member is 5x MTA riders and only 26% live in the city. (6sqft)

Three men were arrested for trafficking 100,000 pounds of weed from California to Queens between 2015 and last December. (QNS)

Video: Meet Danny and Elizabeth Rossi, a father/daughter dup of disabled veterans who run hot dog carts outside the Met. Their interview highlights their infectious personalities but also the surprising black market hot dog cart business. (Viewing NYC)

The proper way to end a subway argument about etiquette is yelling, followed by one person leaving the subway car to go to the next car at the first opportunity, not stabbing two people who are asking you to move your bags. (Gothamist)

A side effect of the eventual East River Park renovation is that the blacktop area frequented by street hockey players and skaters would be turfed over to make way for the displaced East River Park’s baseball fields. The city is trying to figure out where it would move the displaced skaters and street hockey players. (Gothamist)

The MTA plans to make the 14th St station on 6th and 7th Aves fully accessible with new elevators by 2022. (6sqft)

The NYPD has quietly added photos of children and teens to their facial recognition systems, further graying an already very gray area of where artificial intelligence and policing meet. (NY Times)

The monster under the streets of Bushwick is hungry, that’s the only logical explanation for the giant sinkhole that opened up and nearly ate a car whole. (Brooklyn Paper)

The city says its lead paint problem is under control, meanwhile, over 900 classrooms for children under 6 had deteriorated, chipped, or peeling lead paint. That’s one in five classrooms. (Gothamist)

This fall the Brooklyn Bridge will go under a $328 million renovation project to work on the facades and repoint the towers. (Downtown Express)

Jesus Cepeda was killed in midtown when a driver hit him with his SUV while double parking in reverse. No arrests were made. (Gothamist)

Researchers studying trees at Green-Wood Cemetery found a nonnative beetle previously unknown to science. (NY Times)

A series of projects meant to beautify and make Downtown Brooklyn safer for pedestrians was announced by the governor on Thursdays to bring pedestrian crossings, a renovation for the Walt Whitman Library, upgrades in Commodore Barry Park, and more. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This is one story of hundreds from migrant children separated from their parents at the border, who end up in New York City. (Gothamist)

Borough President Eric Adams called out the city’s third-party transfer program as racist and taking homes away from black and brown homeowners is intentional. (Bklyner)

The GOAT Riverside Park goat? After an online poll, Massey, a father of four was declared victorious. After a brief vacation, the goats are back to manicure the park. (Gothamist)

The top 10 hidden beaches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

A day on City Island, which sounds like a little slice of a small New England beach town in the city. (NY Times)

Spend a day in Little Odessa, a neighborhood in complement to Brighton Beach. (amNY)

A look at the fascinating history of Coney Island’s Sea Gate community. (6sqft)

Eat your way through Coney Island. (amNY)

Today’s featured image was sent in by reader @munnybuns

The Briefly for July 22, 2019 – The “A Neighborhood Watch to Protect Against the Government” Edition

Another heatwave and another weekend of failures from ConEd, Friday’s subway glitch, good places for martinis, how to get a bike lane, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subways are looking pretty bleak this week. The 2 and 3 are borked, the 7 isn’t running in Manhattan, the L isn’t servicing most of Brooklyn, and the rest isn’t great either. (Subway Weekender)

Friday’s subway “glitch” that suspended the shuttle and every numbered train except the 7 was caused by a problem that was previously flagged and has been causing hundreds of delays since June. The MTA lost the ability to see where the trains were in their system and shut down every affected line. (amNY)

Photos of New Yorkers who dared face and possibly beat the heat. (NY Times)

Inside the neighborhood watch against ICE in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd was ready to provide “safe and reliable service through the weekend.” (amNY)

After a weekend of punishing weather, it looks like we’re headed towards highs in the 80s this week. Perfect weather for John Trivialta at Parklife this Wednesday! (amNY)

ConEd’s took a dump this weekend, with multiple outages across the city due to the heat. (NY Times)

This was before ConEd cut power to 30,000 in Brooklyn in order to make heat-related repairs. In an attempt to assist ConEd, Governor Cuomo sent state troopers, generators and light towers to the affected neighborhoods. The governor is also widening the investigation into last weekend’s power outage to include this weekend’s outages as well. (amNY)

A Times reporter decided to start delivering burritos for a story and, get this, he found out that it’s a demanding job! (NY Times)

Back in March Anthony Comello shot “Franky Boy” Cali in Staten Island. In court, his lawyer says he was trying to help the president by arresting him for being part of the “deep state.” (NY Times)

Video: Meet Andrew Cote, president of the New York Beekeepers Association. (Viewing NYC)

New York hasn’t changed much over the years, and this aerial photo from 1931 shows it. (r/newyorkcity)

Landlord Zev Pollak is being sued for telling African-Americans that he maintains a “Jewish building” in Midwood. According to the lawsuit, Zev Pollak’s “blatant and repeated conduct in violation of this fundamental American principle of equality is shocking and must end.” (The Real Deal)

The newest cheap-snack-turned-expensive-appetizer craze in the city is the french onion dip. (Eater)

Is Whole Foods overcharging for weight differences in their pre-packaged foods? According to a judge, the answer is no. (Gothamist)

Where did all that water come from that flooded a subway station in Queens on Wednesday of last week? Blame the Skyline Tower construction site. (6sqft)

Russian Doll was nominated for 13 Emmy awards, and in celebration of the nominations and the coming second season, take a look at some of the filming locations of the first season. (Untapped Cities)

You never know what you’ll find at a house clearance sale. Archivists found CDs with 2,400 photos of the aftermath of 9/11, taken by what is assumed to be a construction worker. The photographer hasn’t been identified, but all the photos have been uploaded to Flickr. If you are sensitive to photos from 9/11, avoid this link. (BBC)

International Lou Reed Tai Chi Day is being celebrated at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch on August 3. This isn’t a random choice, Lou Reed practiced Tai Chi for over three decades. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Lyft added subway directions to its app in an arms race with Uber to be the one transit app to rule them all. (Engadget)

End the “what’s a drive-in?” conversations with a trip to “Drive-In Movies at the Mount,” a pop-up drive-in in Staten Island on Friday nights. The fare is more family-friendly than horror, terror, and monsters. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you forget that the city is full of animals, other times you see a hawk in McCarren park eating a rodent. (Greenpointers)

Did you take a dip in a city fountain this weekend? It’s not illegal! At one point, the fountain in Washington Square Park was a pool.

DEA agents uncovered a heroin mill in the Bronx with over $5 million of heroin seized. Three people were arrested. (Patch)

Drinking gin and going down a slide. Carefully. (Time Out)

Want to learn more about the city’s history? Here are some great book picks from reporters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s how to get a bike lane in your neighborhood. (Gothamist)

A February fire in the Metropolitan Detention Center caused a blackout during one of the coldest points of the year. This weekend, another fire caused panic inside the federal jail. (Gothamist)

When the Barclays Center was conceived, the developers promised 400 indoor parking spaces for bikes. A decade later that promise is officially broken. (Streetsblog)

227 Duffield Street in Downtown Brooklyn is an unassuming structure, but there are hints that it was once a part of the Underground Railroad, but no concrete proof. Politicians and advocates are calling on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate the location as a landmark as a way around a demolition permit granted by the city. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want a good martini. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to @munnybuns for today’s photo!

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.