The Briefly for September 11, 2019 – The “Persistence of the NYC Dollar Slice Joint” Edition

The mayor’s failed mayoral campaign promises, how to make the L train slower, a man jumped in the Gowanus, the city buys more ferries, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The city removed the jimson weed plant at 93rd and Columbus, but there’s another plant three blocks away on 96th and Columbus. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jumping into the Gowanus Canal, which has served as a toilet for the city for nearly a century, is pretty high on the “stupidest things you can do in NYC” list, but that didn’t stop some idiot from doing it on Saturday night. He was brought by the NYPD for a psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

Almost nothing is as New York City as the dollar slice joint. Accessible, fast, open all night and welcoming to everyone, these relatively new city staples popped up after the 2008 recession. While Barney’s and Dean & Deluca can’t keep up with NYC real estate, the dollar slice joint persists. (Huff Post)

Is Broadway ready for Robert O’Hara’s “Slave Play?” (NY Times)

The mayor ran for office on a promise to narrow the gap between the richest and poorest New Yorkers. After six years under his leadership, the gap has not changed according to a new report from the Manhattan Institute and the changes that have occurred can be attributed to state-wide and not city-wide initiatives. (Politico)

Animal rights groups weren’t thrilled with the “humane” rodent murder-bucket of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, calling his demonstration grotesque, barbaric, and sadistic and pointed out there are other generally accepted humane ways to eliminate rats that they city hasn’t implemented. (amNY)

The city’s $1.3 billion plan to protect the east side waterfront from Montgomery to E 25th St will get an independent review before moving forward. The city has a deadline of September 2022 to spend federal funding recovery funds allocated to the project (Curbed)

Of Bon Appétit’s 50 best new restaurants in America, 4 are in NYC. (Grub Street)

Were the predatory lending practices that targeted cabbies illegal? The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan is investigating if bank, wire, or mail fraud occurred. The NY Attorney General and the mayor’s office are also investigating. (Patch)

Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick are returning to Broadway in Neil Simon’s “Plaza Suite,” which will begin previews in March. (NY Times)

Every year there are between 100 and 200 cases of Legionnaires’ Disease in the city. The latest was found in residential towers in the Bronx’s Bedford Park. (Norwood News)

One in 15 of the city’s middle schoolers is vaping. (Patch)

The L train doesn’t need to run any slower than it already does, so whoever the jackass was that put their bicycle on the tracks, you are not appreciated. (Brooklyn Paper)

The city is buying three more ferries to add to its fleet for a total cost of $126 million. Taxpayers subsidize each ride by $10.75 on top of the $2.75 fare. The New York City Economic Development Corporation calls this “smart planning.” Is there any wonder that the city’s comptroller’s office isn’t happy with this “smart” plan? (Gothamist)

Photos from Bushwig 2019. (Gothamist)

Photos from DragCon 2019. (Gothamist)

The first of a two-part interview from The Root with Mayor de Blasio was released, covering topics like the Daniel Pantaleo firing, stop and frisk racial disparities, decriminalizing marijuana, raising the minimum wage, and more. (The Root)

The helicopter company that was facing backlash for taking dogs on doorless flights around Manhattan will no longer allow animals on their doors-off flights. (Patch)

A video montage of non-consensual touching by costumed weirdos in Times Square, prepared by the Times Square Alliance. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is seeking $2 billion in restitution from opioid manufacturers, distributors, and pharmacy benefit managers to help New Yorkers who have paid too much in insurance premiums over the past decade because of the opioid epidemic. (amNY)

A driver on Ocean Avenue in Brooklyn killed a 10-year-old boy after his SUV jumped the curb. No arrests were made or tickets were issued at the scene. (Streetsblog)

According to workers, Chipotle is abusing its employees nearly as much as its abusing the stomachs of anyone who eats there. (NY Times)

22 hidden gem private dining rooms in NYC. (Eater)


The Times’ coverage of the anniversary of the September 11 attacks. (NY Times)

The six moments of silence to honor the 2,983 victims of the attacks. (amNY)

Traditionally, the skylight of the Oculus opens on 9/11, but this year it will remain closed due to repairs after it was found to be leaking earlier this year. (Patch)

Remembering 9/11 from the staff of the Windows on the World restaurant, which was located on the 107th floor of the North Tower at the World Trade Center. (Grub Street)

Honoring the Ladder 118/Engine 205’s lost. (Brooklyn Heights Blog)

The Briefly for July 10, 2019 – The “20,000 People Buried Under Washington Square Park” Edition

Today’s US Women’s National Team parade, a series of stabbings, here comes an express F train, the latest in the BQE rehab, Arcade Bakery is closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Saw Mill Playground in Mott Haven reopened with the added bonus of being outfitted with infrastructure that can handle stormwater runoff, up to 1.3 million gallons a year. (Bronx Times)

The cross-town rivalry has been rekindled, but replace town with the country. With DeNiro opening a new studio complex and Netflix expanding big in New York, we’re ready to challenge Hollywood. (NY Times)

Transit Alternatives held a “mass die-in” in Washington Square Park on Tuesday, protesting the street safety crisis that has lead to 15 cyclists killed by drivers in 2019. (amNY)

If you’re someone who gets creeped out at the idea of bodies being buried in common locations in the city, this story isn’t for you. Bone fragments that were found during construction in Washington Square Park were removed during construction will be reinterred at the park. Washington Square Park was once a potter’s field, a common mass grave, and there’s an estimated 20,000 who were buried there. (Downtown Express)

Everyone loves a sale, except when it comes to real estate. It’s counter-intuitive, but the numbers show that price cuts on homes in NYC don’t work in the same fashion as they do at Old Navy. (Street Easy)

If you’re looking for your first home to purchase, congrats, NYC is among the country’s worst places to buy your first home thanks to metrics like friendliness to first-time buyers, affordability, real estate taxes, and crime. (Patch)

8 no car needed day trips away from the city. (NY Times)

Take a look at the first section of Shirley Chisholm State Park that recently opened. (Untapped Cities)

You can live like a convicted felon! Two of Paul Manafort’s homes are for sale as he sits in jail for seven-and-a-half years. (Street Easy)

So, uh, maybe in 2019 it’s time for Big Gay Ice Cream to change the name of their “Salty Pimp” ice cream? (Eater)

The mayor is calling for more transparency and oversight surrounding taxi medallions after a 45-day review of what’s lead to the financial crisis in the taxi industry. Medallion owners and a portion of the city council were calling for a bailout, but the mayor’s plan falls short of including one. (Gothamist)

The Wing is expanding its women-only coworking empire with an additional outpost in Williamsburg and another in Bryant Park. (Curbed)

The mayor’s plan to close Rikers, explained. (Curbed)

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams isn’t having it, asking the city to reduce the size of the detention complex planned for Atlantic Avenue to 900 beds from 1,150. Adams also requesting for more health services in jails to reduce recidivism. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you never want your Stranger Things experience to end, Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein are performing music from the show in October at Brooklyn Steel. Tickets go on sale this Friday. (BrooklynVegan)

Has summer finally made the city feral? A New Jersey man crashed his car into a blockade near a federal building downtown claiming he had a bomb in his car. The bomb squad determined he did not. (Gothamist)

A woman was stabbed to death at the Sutter Avenue-Rutland Road 3 train station on Monday night. Someone was taken into custody, but no charges were files at publication. (amNY)

A woman was stabbed in the Gowanus Whole Foods parking lot on Monday night. A suspect, Rodney Robinson, was arrested and charged. The victim was treated at a nearby hospital. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s go-to spots for French pastries, Arcade Bakery, will be closing. Roger Gural cites rheumatoid arthritis as the reason he’s closing. (Eater)

Roger Gural’s and Karen Bornarth’s recipe for croissants. With 33 steps, it’s probably easier to experience them yourself at the bakery. (Serious Eats)

The NYPD wasted no time towing cars away from the newly demapped area of Willets Point, freeing up the area for redevelopment. (QNS)

It’s an alternative community art space that’s in the location of a former taxi cab garage. No, this one’s no in Bushwick, it’s in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

There are 114 uncounted votes in the Katz/Cabán primary that were rejected for errors by poll workers. The current vote separation is 16 and are hundreds of ballots that were rejected and with such a slim lead, each one will become a legal fight of its own. (The Indypendent)

Watch a time-lapse of the installation of Phenomenal Nature—Mrinalini Mukherjee at the Met Breuer. (Viewing NYC)

The BQE rehab panel won’t accept any new concepts and have hinted that they will be suggesting a less severe plan than the ones that would require the removal of the Brooklyn Promenade. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here comes DragCon. (amNY)

How to watch today’s U.S. Women’s National Team’s parade, which starts at 9:30 this morning. (Curbed)

Some Nike subway ads featuring Megan Rapinoe were vandalized in what the NYPD says is a potential hate crime. (amNY)

When the parade is all over, 350 sanitation workers and 19 trucks will begin their job of cleaning up the revelry. (amNY)

Pre-foreclosures are up 43% in the city, with the largest number of them coming from East New York. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The MTA is adding some F express trains in Brooklyn to the morning and evening commutes in an attempt to shave some commuting times down. (amNY)

9 great theater district restaurants for before or after a show. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for September 26, 2018 – Please Don’t Say Bed Bugs Have Infested the MTA

Are city buses infested with bed bugs? Placing values on individual trees in Prospect Park, the Museum of Pizza, another mini-L train shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

“How can the MTA get worse” you may ask? How about several buses were removed from service because of a possible BED BUG INFESTATION on a scale that is “unheard of.” Why is the MTA sanding down wooden subway benches? Is it bed bugs? Oh god, it’s bed bugs, isn’t it?

You have until October 12 to register for the November 6 general election.

Is there a more New York thing than putting a dollar value on the eco-friendliness of trees? The trees in Prospect Park provide the city with an estimated $1.5 million in eco benefits to the city, with the most valuable tree hitting $454 of value on an annual basis.

The decaying Parkway Hospital in Forest Hills will become 350 mixed-income apartments.

Can you resist the Insta-siren song of the pop-up Museum of Pizza in Williamsburg? However you get there, it won’t be on the L train during October weekends. The big shutdown is six months away, but October’s weekends are giving another preview.

Okay, you’ve decided to move because of the L train shutdown. Where are you going to go? Curbed breaks it down.

Brooklyn’s Democratic Party Committee meeting is on Thursday night, but leadership is already playing deceptive games.

If you’re someone who rants and raves about soup dumplings, here’s a list of 13 exemplary soup dumplings from Eater.

The raccoon accused of attacking humans on Columbus Avenue between 71st and 72nd has been released without bail and cleared of all charges.

Load up on carbs, bring your friends, it’s fun to share and let’s recommend…20 pasta destinations in the city from Eater.

DragCon is this weekend, and amNY has your guide on how to spend a day according to Trixie Mattel.

Take a look at the designs of the second phase of the Hudson Yards’ parkland, scheduled to break ground in 2020 and finish in 2023.

New York City has never sued under the 2004 law requiring landlords to test for lead paint. The purpose of the law was to end childhood lead poisoning by 2010. Over 62,000 children have tested positive for elevated levels of lead in their blood since 2010.

The MTA doesn’t have finding for Andy Byford’s mythical “Fast Forward” plan, but they’re hoping that proving they’re responsible enough to keep stations clean will show they can be trusted with the cash.

Which neighborhood has the highest percentage of sub-A grade restaurants?

Fyre Fest’s Billy McFarland is claiming that he has an undiagnosed mental illness and that’s why he defrauded people of over $26 million multiple times.


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