The Briefly for Valentine’s Day, 2020 – The “Your Plant Stylist Appointment is Coming Up” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 12 places to smooch your Valentine, Bloomberg tries to distract from his record with memes, the 27 top burgers, Trump vs NY rolls on, and more

Today – Low: 18˚ High: 34˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 30˚ High: 47˚

12 places to smooch on Valentine’s Day. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

There have been no cases of coronavirus in New York City and despite this, the city’s Chinatowns are suffering. (Marina Fang for Huff Post)

A look forward on this frigid morning to the spring’s street festivals on the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

For $2,000 someone will come to your home and style your plants. Welcome to the world of plant stylists. (Steven Kurutz for NY Times)

About half the adult population of the city, roughly 3.4 million people, spent one of the last few years living below the poverty line, according to a new report from the Robin Hood Foundation and Columbia University. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Ready for a cocktail crawl? Here’s how to get it done on Atlantic Avenue. (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

Michael Bloomberg’s forceful push into meme culture is being lead by Mick Purzycki, who is the CEO of Jerry Media, famous for stealing content without crediting the original creators. Can the people who brought you the marketing for the Fyre Festival distract us enough from the negative headlines and quotes from Bloomberg’s past? (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

Roses are red, Violets are blue, Unlike the F train, I'll be there for you

The mayor signed a bill this week that will extend government-funded health care to families of all municipal workers, not just firefighters and police, who died in the line of duty or from 9/11 related diseases. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The annual tradition continues: Phil Collins Day is on Saturday. (Kate Hooker for Brooklyn Based)

The moment the state announced the end of brokers’ fees, rents jumped up about 6% across the board. Now that the fees are gone, it’s unlikely we’ll see a 6% drop back down. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

City Comptroller Scott String is calling for a Bill of Rights for NYC tenants to protect them from unscrupulous landlords. He has a proposal as well, including limiting security deposits to one month of rent, providing itemized statements of damage, a five-day gras period for late rent, requiring a court order for evictions, and much more. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

GZA played ‘Liquid Swords’ at the Blue Note Jazz Club in honor of the album’s 25th anniversary. (BrooklynVegan)

The top five potato dishes in the city, according to Robert Sietsema. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The governor is making a new push for legalizing compensated gestational surrogacy with a campaign called “Love Makes A Family.” New York is one of three states that hasn’t legalized the practice. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Real Estate Porn: Don Lemon is selling his Harlem condo. You can live like Don Lemon for only $1.75 million. The condo looks like a great place to get drunk on New Year’s Eve and make mistakes. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The story of a meander and 14 photos of central Park Slope. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

48 pictures of the beautiful Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Manhattan, we have to have a serious conversation. We know you’re not going to Brooklyn on the weekends, even if you need groceries and Brooklyn has the only Wegmans in the city. You want to veg out, binge the new season of Narcos and order some Seamless. That’s cool, because now Wegmans delivers to Manhattan. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

In a literal quid pro quo, the president said if New York stops suing the president, the president will restore New Yorkers’ access to Trusted Traveler Programs programs. This ban happened the day he was acquitted after being impeached. Letitia James has filed 35 lawsuits against the federal government since January 2019. (Xeni Jardin for BoingBoing)

A look into the illegal, but welcome, underground of street car washers. (Sandra E. Garcia and Stephen Speranza for NY Times)

Mayor Bill de Blasio and Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza came to a tentative agreement on a contract that gives increased pay and paid parental leave to principals and assistant principals. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Got furniture you want to get rid of but it’s too nice for the curb (note: nothing is too nice for @stoopingnyc)? Here’s where to sell used, vintage, and antique furniture in the city. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

Bronx City Council Member Vanessa Gibson is going to pay $5,000 for abusing her position on City Council to get out of paying a $50 ticket for driving while using her phone. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A developer in Crown Heights was ordered to remove all construction equipment from the potential site of two 16-story towers after they were discovered violating a temporary restraining order. Activists have targeted the buildings as part of an anti-gentrification campaign lead by Movement to Protect the People. The group claimed the buildings would block sunlight for the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, but this has been refuted by the BBG and should not be confused with the 39-story tower that the BBG is actively campaigning against in its “Fight for Sunlight” campaign. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

27 top burgers in the city. (Eater)

Thank you to my valentine Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for February 11, 2020 – The “Brokers’ Fees Are Unbanned” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The subway mascot Cardvaark, the hottest restaurants in Queens, a sleepover at IKEA, the plastic bag ban, an Oreo slide, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 48˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.

Congrats to the Barclays Center subway stop, which has the city’s worst privately owned subway elevator functioning for only 74.2% of 2019, out of service for a total of three months of the year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Video: Go behind the scenes and back in time with this Metropolitan Museum of Art behind the scenes tour from 1928. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Remember when brokers’ fees were banned? Brokers’ fees have been unbanned, temporarily at least. The Real Estate Board of New York sued the state and the judge put a temporary restraining order on the rule. Snip snap. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hulu is taking over Rough Trade this weekend in an installation to promote the new Hulu version of High Fidelity. (Grant Lancaster for amNewyork Metro)

New York is the ninth most dangerous state for online dating, which takes into account internet crime rates and STI transmission rates. The safest site for online dating is Maine and the most dangerous is Alaska, which has the country’s highest man to woman ratio. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best bars on the Upper West Side. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

Aldea, which arrives a Michelin star, is closing on February 22. Chef George Mendes cites plans to “take a break, recharge creatively, and refocus,” with no other reason given for the closure. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Pizza Rat won Gothamist’s poll for the new subway mascot, but let’s not forget the subway’s previous mascot, Cardvaark, who looks like everyone’s least coolest cousin wearing a homemade Halloween outfit, who was supposed to help us all transition from tokens to MetroCards. Fun fact, the same person who brought us Cardvaark also brought us Poetry in Motion. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Okay, so you’re moving from Manhattan to Brooklyn. Here are 19 answers to common questions. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

The NYPD is reporting 2019 saw the first rise in the number of Stop and Frisks since 2013, up 22% from 2018. An NYPD spokesperson, who must think that we’re all stupid, said that it’s “unlikely to be a true increase in stops but rather more accurate and complete reporting.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

With a history of racist and victim-blaming comments, does the Sergeants Benevolent Association’s Ed Mullins really speak for the actual NYPD? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

Take a deep breath in and release that tension in your body. The Yankees have reported for spring training, which means actual spring is coming. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Everything you need to know about NYC’s citywide ferry. (Tanay Warerkar for Curbed)

What you need to know about the state’s plastic bag ban, which kicks into gear in less than three weeks. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Manhattan’s community boards are older than the borough’s population, homeowners hold a disproportionately high number of seats and Hispanic people are underrepresented. Not a great representation. (Rachel Holliday Smith and Ann Choi for The City)

Oreo is building a giant inflatable slide in Herald Square that will open February 21st, so when you’re in Herald Square and your friends see the slide and ask what it is, you can look effortlessly cool by telling them “Oreo put it up.” (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

If you’ve always wanted to sleep in the Red Hook IKEA, here’s your chance. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

After an ICE agent shot Eric Diaz in the face, it’s time to ask if New York City really a sanctuary city? (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

The Reckless Driver Accountability Act will require drivers who rack up five red light tickets or 15 school speed zone violations within a one year period to take a safe driving course or they’ll lose their car until they do. The bill is expected to pass City Council this week. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: Cupid’s Undie Run, kind of like a street version of the No Pants Subway Ride but for charity, hit the streets last weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Video: ‘Commute’ by Scott Lazer is a beautiful film, shot on 16mm, even if it’s focused on Penn Station in rush hour. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

1 Dot = 1 Person. Explore how racially divided the city is using 2010 census data. (Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service)

Feds to the Hudson River rail tunnel: Drop Dead. (Ryan Hutchins for Politico)

Another day, another water main break. This time the water main on South Street near Pike Slio broke, flooding the area. (Bowery Boogie)

R40, La Rotisserie du Coin, La Mian Lounge join the hottest restaurants in Queens.

Featured photo sent in from reader @mfireup

The Briefly for May 10, 2019 – The “Harlem’s WWI War Heroes Who Who Brought Jazz to France” Edition

Closing the Kusher Loophole, OMNY is coming, the officer whose chokehold killed Eric Garner’s disciplinary trial is moving forward, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The subway diversions are minimal this weekend, but when the bar is already so low, it’s hard to get underneath it. (Subway Changes)

Here’s a crazy idea. Is the L train slowdown going okay? (Bklyner)

NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo’s disciplinary trial in the death of Eric Garner will go forward, a New York State Supreme Court judge ruled Thursday. (880 WCBS)

Declawing your cat may soon be illegal. Manhattan Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal’s 2015 bill is gaining traction again thanks to the newly formed Domestic Animal Welfare Committee formed this year. The bill has the support of the Humane Society and Black Sabbath bassist Geezer Butler. (Politico)

The Harlem Hellfighters spent 191 days on the Front during World War I and in their time there, they helped introduce jazz to France and were some of the war’s most decorated soldiers. (6sqft)

It seems like the city shouldn’t have to deter people from parking on sidewalks, but here we are. City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer is pushing to put traffic cameras specifically looking to catch drivers who block bike lanes and sidewalks as a part of Transportation Alternatives’ #TechforSafety campaign. (LIC Post)

Scrap the SHSAT test for the city’s elite high schools. That’s the message from Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network chapter in the city. (Politico)

The murder trial of the man accused of killing Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz began with opening statements from the prosecution saying the murder was pre-meditated. (NY City Lens)

Some information about the OMNY system, the new system to replace MetroCards, and how they will work. They’re scheduled to be rolled out at the end of the month, but MetroCards will be around until 2023. (amNY)

The New York Aquarium has four new black-footed penguins, which are endangered. Of course, there are photos of baby penguins. (amNY)

Stop telling people things you heard at parties and actually learn about the city’s tap water. (StreetEasy)

The Soho Grifter was sentenced to 4-12 years, fined $24,000 and ordered to pay back $199,000. The only thing the fake German heiress will inherit is a prison jumpsuit. (NY Times)

The cheapest one-bedroom apartments in the city are, unsurprisingly, in far-flung neighborhoods, but who can argue with a one-bedroom for less than $1500? (Patch)

Here’s a quiz on what you can or can’t do on the subway. If you fail, you have to move to Hoboken. Sorry, those are just the rules. (Gothamist)

As it fights to contain the measles outbreak, the city’s attention is starting to turn towards schools with less than 90% vaccination rates, like the Brooklyn Waldorf School, which 24% of students are unvaccinated. (NY Times)

If you’ve never had the, uh, pleasure of driving in Manhattan, here’s a video to give you an idea of what it’s like. (Viewing NYC)

Here are the neighborhoods where it takes the NYPD the longest to respond to a 911 call. (Patch)

Where to pick up your picnic vittles near to the city park of your choice. (amNY)

Del Posto was named the best Italian restaurant in the nation by The Daily Meal. Eleven restaurants in the city made the top fifty. (Patch)

Take a look inside the TWA Hotel at JFK Airport one week before its opening day. (Curbed)

2019: After the Fall of New York. Imagine an 80s b-movie version of Children of Men, Escape From New York, Mad Max and Beneath the Planet of the Apes, but shittier and you’ll end up with this Italian movie. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s 17 new approved bills is aimed at closing the “Kushner loophole,” which allowed landlords to falsely claim the number of rent-regulated tenants in its buildings. (6sqft)

Shakespeare & Co is opening a bookstore in Brookfield Place in Battery Park, where Amazon just opened a new store. (amNY)

21 of the best LGBTQ bars in NYC to party at right now, depending on the time of day you read this. (amNY)

The mayor is calling the NYC Care card a “new health coverage option,” but it’s more of a public awareness campaign for pre-existed public services form the city. It’s a public awareness campaign that can improve public health, but the mayor is clearly misrepresenting it as health insurance because of his delusional idea that anyone wants to see him run for president. (Gothamist)

A mini-Smorgasburg is coming to Hudson Yards. Heaven forbid that people who live there have to go to Brooklyn for anything. (6sqft)

Rene Samaniego, an NYPD vice detective, admitted to participating in a prolific prostitution ring and gambling enterprise throughout Queens, Brooklyn and Nassau County. (QNS)

Chartwell Booksellers, the world’s only Winston Churchill bookstore, has been nearly hidden for 36 years on E 52nd St. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to rooftop bars and outdoor drinking in 2019. (Grub Street)

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