The Briefly for June 13, 2019 – The “A New Subway Villain Has Emerged” Edition

The governor will sign the rent reform laws, the mayor looks to further restrict Uber and Lyft’s operations, the best veggie burger in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the city’s top ten public high schools. (Patch)

The city’s new mansion tax is hitting on July 1, and sellers are already trying to price their way out of it. (StreetEasy)

New York City has a new subway villain. On different incidents, a man threw a bag of concrete, a fire extinguisher, Christmas lights, and a shovel. (Gothamist)

10 buildings connected to NYC’s maritime past. (Untapped Cities)

The best restaurants of 2019, according to Eater’s Ryan Sutton. (Eater)

“There’s a daunting task ahead of us on this,” is an understatement by the chair of the committee overseeing the $4 billion reconstruction of the BQE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed the mannequin children strewn across the city in small cages? No Kids in Cages is responsible for the 25 protest installations across Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Outside of San Francisco, Brooklyn has the country’s most booming tech sector, growing 356% in the last ten years. (amNY)

Where to eat near the Boardwalk in Rockaway Beach. (Eater)

While the Governors Island “urban camping experience” isn’t exactly camping by most stretches of the imagination with miniature cabins, 1500 thread count sheets, wifi, electricity, a spa, and room service, but it does look nice (6sqft)

In the last year, the city ensured a minimum wage for Uber and Lyft drivers and prevented any new drivers from being added to the pool of e-hail vehicles which already makes up 29% of all cars below 60th in Manhattan. The mayor’s next restriction will be limiting the amount of time e-hail vehicles can cruise below 96th in Manhattan without a passenger. Currently, e-hail vehicles spend 41% of their time without passengers. That rate would have to drop to 31% under the coming rule, or companies would face fines or potentially have their licenses to operate revoked. (amNY)

Here is the horseshoe route for the World Pride Parade on June 30, which is expected to be the largest Pride Parade in history. (6sqft)

The DOT unveiled plans for a protected bike lane on Central Park West. The Community Board and City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal had called for a two-way bike lane, similar to Prospect Park West, but the DOT called that idea “psychologically unrealistic.” (Gothamist)

A guide to (responsibly) day drink. (The Infatuation)

I’m bullish on anything that brings more joy and delight to the city in a near-invisible fashion. See Me Tell Me is playing hide-and-seek with her art on Instagram. Right now the has under a thousand followers, but let’s see if we can’t change that. (Bedford + Bowery)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds” may be the creed of the postal service, but in the city, it’s the food delivery person that follows that creed to the letter and City Comptroller Scott Stringer is adding his voice to those calling for the legalization of electric bikes with an op-ed for Streetsblog. (Streetsblog)

Take a ride on the 3rd Ave El in a film from 1955, documenting Manhattan’s last elevated subway line. (Viewing NYC)

The governor supports the rent reform bills that are working their way through the legislature and has voiced that once they’re on his desk he will sign them into law, which hasn’t always been a guarantee. (amNY)

When the rent reform bills become law, it will be the signal that the influence that New York’s real estate industry holds over the state’s politics is not untouchable. (NY Times)

Yoko Ono’s ‘The Reflection Project’ is moving into unconventional spaces in lower Manhattan, encouraging you to “rally the collective consciousness towards heightened awareness, hope and action.” Just don’t do it in someone else’s way. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Gem Spa on St Mark’s and Second Ave is in danger of closing. A combination of rising rents and a former employee selling cigarettes to a minor have threatened the iconic store’s 80-year existence. It’s likely the best place you can buy egg creams and fedoras and coffee and candy in the city. (Vanishing New York)

Another detainee died in the custody of the Department of Corrections two days after the death of Layleen Polanco on Rikers Island. The cause of death and name haven’t been released. (Patch)

This new IKEA robotic furniture looks right out of The Fifth Element. (6sqft)

The governor is pushing for the state to extend the statute of limitations for rape victims and change the legal definition of harassment. (Politico)

The new status symbol for performers is a Broadway residency and the latest name to make their way is Dave Chappelle. Dave Chappelle Live on Broadway will happen from July 9-13 with tickets going on same June 18th. (Gothamist)

A guide to Pride in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The House Judiciary Committee passed the bill to reauthorize and fund the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund for about seven more decades after being publicly shamed by Jon Stewart. (Patch)

How did Jon Stewart become the voice of the ongoing victims of 9/11? (NY Times)

“It’s another entertainment show beginning with an overwrought speech of a shaken host.” The first Daily Show with Jon Stewart after the 9/11 attacks is still worth watching. (Comedy Central)

A first look at the new DUMBO library. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Drone photos and videos from high above Green-Wood Cemetery. (Gothamist)

The city’s best veggie burgers. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for June 11, 2019 – The “The Pizza Wars of New York Are Getting Saucy” Edition

14th St will become a busway in July, the mayor’s nemesis is a 16-year-old teen, New Yorkers support ending the measles religious exemption, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Two Bridges towers are at the center of a legal battle, centered around the developers’ attempts to work around the city council and the land use review procedures. (Curbed)

Respect to whoever was able to cover an entire Q train with graffiti extremely quickly without being caught. (@JMartinezNYC)

Welcome to Soho, or as the Times puts it, “CBD stores and face-mask pushers are going to destroy us all.” (NY Times)

The Brooklyn Pizza War of 2019 has only just begun. L&B Spumoni Gardens is opening up a DUMBO outpost mere steps from Grimaldi’s and Juliana’s. May the best slice win. (Eater)

It appears that Robert De Niro is on the verge of building a movie studio in Astoria. (QNS)

A correction from yesterday (thanks Harry!), the apartment building planned for the former Hell’s Angels clubhouse will be 22 apartments, not 22 stories. (Curbed)

Tiffani Torres is 16, a twice-caller on “Ask the Mayor” on WNYC, an activist with Teens Take Charge, and a thorn in the mayor’s side. She’s correctly criticized the mayor for his DOA presidential run distracting him from city business and has been vocal about the systemic issues facing the city’s schools. Is it too late to elect her mayor? She sat down for an interview with the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Does Times Square need a 24-hour, multi-story “immersive” Krispy Kreme with a theater and, no I’m not kidding, a goddamn “glaze waterfall?” Of course it does. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s Pride Parade took over Park Slope last weekend with heavy splashes of color, celebration, politicians, and remembrance of the Stonewall Riots half a century ago. (Brooklyn Paper)

Layleen Polanco, a 27-year old transgender woman, was found dead at Rikers Island on Friday. Polanco was a member of the House of Xtravaganza (get yourself up to speed on Ball Culture) and was arrested in April for assault and possession of a controlled substance. (Patch)

The city council scheduled a hearing to look into accusations against Grubhub (who owns Seamless), as well as Uber Eats, Doordash and the like, from restaurants accusing the company of charging fees for customer calls that never resulted in orders. (Eater)

10 of the best running spots in New York City, even if I think saying the High Line is a great place to run is like saying the Brooklyn Bridge is a great place to bike. (6sqft)

A helicopter crashed into AXA Equitable Center in Midtown, killing the pilot. Have you noticed how many helicopters are constantly flying around Manhattan? Manhattan has three public heliports and this was the second crash in less than a month, but that doesn’t seem to slow down the $800 trips to the Hamptons or the new service to take people to JFK Airport. (NY Times)

“Oh, you’re a girl, I thought you were a guy,” is an auspicious way to start a job somewhere. A chef is suing Hudson Yards Spanish food hall Mercado Little Spain, claiming she was fired for being a woman. (Eater)

With the Stop Violence in the Sex Trades Act, New York has a path to become the first state to decriminalize sex work, even in the face of criticism from the governor, the mayor, and Corey Johnson. (Patch)

The NYPD are arresting turnstile jumpers. The officers have wide latitude to decide who they arrest and who they ticket, so it should become obvious very quickly that people of color will be arrested at a higher rate. In 2019 people of color represent 87% of people arrested for farebeating. exact numbers aren’t known because the NYPD is refusing to comply with a court order demanding them to disclose these numbers. (Gothamist)

The conversation about rent control has gotten so muddy and opaque it’s hard to know if this article which says that mom-and-pop landlords may decide to sell their buildings if rent reform passes, is steeped in the truth or has roots in one of the many astroturfing campaigns from larger landlords and developers. (amNY)

New Yorkers overwhelmingly support the end of religious exemptions for the measles vaccine. Overwhelming is 85%, which includes more than 80% support from the Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant populations polled. There’s a bill in the state’ legislature as you read this, but there is only a week left in the legislative session until summer recess. (Patch)

St. James Place in Bed Stuy is now Christopher “Notorious B.I.G.” Wallace Way. (amNY)

Congrats to Gothamist on their site redesign. (Gothamist)

The perfect time for a sci-fi radio show is after midnight when everything is quiet and your imagination is ripe for exploration of its dark recesses. The “Hour of the Wolf” has aired between 1am – 3am on Thursday mornings since 1972. Helmed by Jim Freund, the show has had nearly every writer of importance on the show, the first U.S. broadcast of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, and whose website was originally a collaboration with Tim Berners-Lee, the literal father of the world wide web. A living piece of broadcasting history on Atlantic Avenue. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 14th St busway will arrive on July 1, drastically changing traffic and (hopefully_ speeding up the buses. (amNY)

32 great places to eat something kind of healthy for dinner. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for April 11, 2019 – The “Not the Best Place to Live, Not Even Close” Edition

A Y2K-like bug brought down some of the city’s GPS systems, Pat Kiernan has a new podcast, MTA workers fight the upcoming L Project, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

New York’s favorite news anchor, Pat Kiernan, has a new podcast. (NY1)

The state senate unanimously passed the Religious Garb Act, which will allow the wearing of “any attire, clothing, or facial hair” protected under the Human Rights Law for religious purposes. (QNS)

US News & World Report released the 2019 best places to live and we’re… not #1. Are you insane? We’re 90 out of 125. If you want #1, go move to Austin. (NY Post)

Maybe traffic cameras should, you know, police traffic regulations. That’s what State Assembly Member Michael DenDekker is proposing by adding bicycle lane violations to what traffic cameras enforce. (Sunnyside Post)

Murderinos, this one has your name written all over it. An 80-year-old Queens man was arrested for a Virginia double murder from 1973. (Gothamist)

Turns out those protective sidewalk covers don’t do much when the whole damn building collapses on top of them. No one was hurt when it happened in Williamsburg, except a few cars and maybe a penny-farthing bicycle or unicycle. It’s Williamsburg after all. (Gothamist)

A pizzeria shakedown straight out of a Jon Stewart comedy routine, but it’s real and the “mobsters” are facing up to 20 years in prison. (Brooklyn Paper)

These marijuana entrepreneurs have HIGH hopes for legalization. Get it? HIGH HOPES! Ugh. (Gothamist)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

A guided dumpling crawl through Queens. (Eater)

After 35 years, bookbook on Bleecker Street will be closing. In order to stay open, the store would need a rent reduction and in 2019, that ain’t happening. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The five best grilled cheeses in the city. (Thrillist)

Foreclosures in the Bronx are up 28% in the first quarter of 2019. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s shortest bike lane has been found. (Brooklyn Paper)

This weekend’s “Blessing of the Rides” in Coney Island is a New York City annual tradition. Here’s what to expect from the egg cream christening to the blessing itself. (amNY)

A group of transit workers is calling the L Project’s (the new and crappy name for the non-shutdown) air quality into question with flyers saying the silica dust in the air is a danger to anyone who breathes it in. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez’ office broke up a gun trafficking ring after an undercover detective purchased three dozen guns, including automatic weapons. (amNY)

The Harlem School of the Arts will undergo a $9.5 million renovation that will begin in August and update the brutalist style exterior of the building with a glass wall, and make other welcome improvements. (NY Times)

There is no law dictating that your apartment be 80% covered with rugs, but most leases include it in a clause. What are the consequences for not complying? Well, that’s a little harder to define. (StreetEasy)

A look inside Manhattan’s first Ikea. It looks a lot like an Ikea, but you’re gonna look anyway. (Curbed)

The inevitable lawsuit over the city’s vaccine mandate has arrived. (Gothamist)

Why is there a 3,000 square foot bounce house in Dumbo? Because art, of course. (Time Out)

NYC is being afflicted by a Y2K-esque bug in some of its GPS systems. This is a once every twenty year GPS reset and city officials are being very tight-lipped about it. (NY Times)

What’s going on with the smoldering anus in Union Square? (Gothamist)

Saturday is Record Store Day, the most important holiday for the vinyl obsessed and for record store owners across the city. (amNY)

A look at City Hall Station, the unused subway station where the 6 train turns around which shows the grandeur of how the subways could have been. (NY Times)

The best neighborhoods for college grads. (Localize Labs)

Is removing stops the right way to make a bus route faster? Consider the case of the M14. (Bowery Boogie)

An interview with Carlo Scissura, the head of the new BQE expert panel. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The best Easter brunch spots.

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