The Briefly for July 9, 2020 – The “They Don’t Call it a Subway Doomsday for Nothing” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor’s plan for schools in September, the worst place in NYC, wait times for Covid-19 test results slip, frozen boozy drinks, and more

Today – Low: 76˚ High: 85˚
Humid throughout the day.

What’s the worst place in NYC? Seems there’s some consensus around Penn Station. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Despite what he may think, the president doesn’t actually have control over how the city’s schools operate. Mayor de Blasio’s plan, which is only a plan, is still subject to the state’s approval. Early August is the state’s deadline for approving or modifying the city’s plan. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s schools are facing $642 million in budget cuts. The city’s private schools received tens of millions of dollars from the federal government’s PPP program. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The mayor announced his plan for school openings in the fall. His plans call for a partial reopening this September. Classroom attendance would be limited to one to three days a week. While it’s a burden for children, teachers, parents, the economy, and everyone involved, it’s a burden that is not worse than death, which is what his plan is hoping to prevent. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

A deeper dive into the options already presented for the city’s schools for in-person learning. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Here’s a terrifying map of what the city’s subways could look like if the MTA doesn’t get any federal assistance and uses the Riders Alliance 2010 “Doomsday on the MTA” report. To accommodate the loss in revenues, the MTA would have to cut the 1, 2, 3, 7, B, D, F, M, G, J, Z, and Franklin Avenue Shuttle. They don’t call it doomsday for nothing. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Things were already projected to be bad for the MTA, but for each tax dollar the city doesn’t collect, the MTA is pushed further and further into the economic abyss. The MTA’s projected tax revenue for 2021 will be $1.4 billion lower than expected. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The subways shut down for four hours a day and that may seem inconvenient, but a transit strike in 1966 shut the subways down for two weeks. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A Queens driver hit and killed 64-year-old Richard O’Flaherty in Far Rockaway on Tuesday. The driver was not charged. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Governors Island will reopen on July 15th for “passive recreation” from 10 am – 7 pm. You’ll need tickets in advance and they can be reserved beginning on Friday. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Apartment Porn: It used to be a school, now it’s a $22.5 million penthouse with four bedrooms, a two-level terrace, and a double-sided marble fireplace. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos: Why the hell is the NYPD protecting statues of Christopher Columbus across the city 24/7? (Gerch Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Someone driving an SUV drove through a crowd of protesters in Times Square, sending at least one to the hospital. The driver was taken into custody, but not arrested or charged. If the NYPD can do it with initial mayoral support and no consequences, what’s to stop a citizen from doing the same thing? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

New York Attorney General Letitia James is calling for an “entirely new accountability structure” for the NYPD, including reducing Mayor Bill de Blasio’s role in overseeing the force. Under James’ recommendation, a commission of the City Council, Public Advocate, Comptroller, and the mayor would have control over the NYPD’s budget. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The development announced for the failed Amazon HQ2 site has hit a wall: City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. Without Van Bramer’s support, the project’s needed rezoning can’t happen. Long Island City’s newly constructed apartments are 60% empty. This plan would bring an additional 2,700 apartments to the area. Van Bramer’s idea for the land is simple: it’s public land and should be used by the public. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

8 tips for negotiating your lease renewal in NYC. (Localize.City)

In an article about how graffiti is on the rise during the Covid-19 pandemic, the Times starts by saying the conditions are perfect for “a new generation of graffiti writers.” The Old Gray Lady indeed. (David Gonzalez for NY Times)

The city’s oldest gay bar, Julius’ Bar, launched a GoFundMe campaign to keep the bar and it employees afloat until indoor dining comes back, which may be a while. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The availability for Covid-19 testing has increased across the city, but the availability of labs to process those tests hasn’t risen to meet the demand. As a result, wait times for test results have slipped from the three-day range to upwards of a week. Is your result still relevant if it’s been a week since the test? (Elizabeth Kim and Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Where to pick up food near Central Park. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The staff at Jack the Horse in Brooklyn Heights are accusing the owners of misusing thousands of dollars in donations intended for employees. The GoFundMe states (errors and all) “We still hoping to raise money to support our wonderful staff who are out of work due to COVID-19.” The owners paid food and alcohol vendors and insurance bills with the $15,000+ of donations to the GoFundMe. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A five-story building partially collapsed in Murray Hill on E 38th in Manhattan on Wednesday afternoon. One person was injured and was brought to the hospital. (Ben Yakas and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

What’s your favorite pre-pandemic food? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

A few NYC holy grail apartments: 2 bedrooms for under $2,000 a month. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

The story of how an Angela Davis quote ended up being displayed prominently towards the Barclays Center subway entrance. (Norman Oder for BKLYNER)

The Board of Elections in New York City turns Election Day into Groundhog Day—we see the same problematic deficiencies each cycle: despite a bipartisan cross-ideological desire to fix them, they reoccur like clockwork. The time has come to use the important expansion of vote-by-mail to finally fix these consistent problems.
– City Councilmember Carline Rivera, Voting by mail must be expanded to fix existing problems

Interactive Map: More than 13,000 Manhattan-based businesses secured loans of more than $150,000 from the federal government through the Paycheck Protection Program. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Major League Soccer announced the schedule for their summer tournament and NYCFC’s first game is today (Thursday) morning at 9 am. (Joe Pantorno for Bronx Times)

RIP Jane Walentas, the artist behind the three-decade restoration of Jane’s Carousel in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

Twenty places across the city to enjoy nature. (Jenna Fanelli for Bronx Times)

The city will only retain 50 of its 95 park rangers, thanks to the city’s budget cuts. In a budget of $88.2 billion, the cuts to the park ranger program are saving $10 million, or 0.01% of the budget. (Reuven Blau for The City)

13 places to get frozen boozy drinks in Astoria. (Claire Leaden for We Heart Astoria)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 26, 2019 – The “Nightmare NIMBY Neighborhood” Edition

The MTA’s $51.4 billion Captial Plan was approved, white New Yorkers are twice as likely to smoke marijuana, Facebook eyes the post office, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Working Families Party is accusing Governor Cuomo of creating a conspiracy to destroy them for daring to run Cynthia Nixon against him in his last primary. (NY Times)

Andrew Cuomo and his longtime girlfriend Sandra Lee have the world’s largest display of LEGO art” with classics like Michaelangelo’s David, Degas’s Whistler’s Mother, Munch’s The Scream and Van Gogh’s Starry Night interpreted in LEGO starting this weekend at the New York Hall of Science. (Time Out)

Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez and New York State Attorney General Letitia James sued ICE over the arrests that have taken place outside of the city’s courthouses. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Screaming, propaganda, shoving, conspiracy theories about the Department of Transportation, and accusations of taking money from pedophiles, just another day in the NIMBY-nightmare neighborhood of Park Slope. (Streetsblog)

A peek inside Michael Cera’s new $2.4 million Bed-Stuy home. (Mansion Global)

93% of people arrested for marijuana possession in NYC are black and Latino, but white New Yorkers are twice as likely to have smoked marijuana than anyone else. (Patch)

Operation DUMBO Drop 2019 is a go. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

We are a month away from early voting in this year’s elections, so it’s time to start educating yourself about the five ballot questions. (Gotham Gazette)

The $51.4 billion MTA Capital Plan for 2020 – 2024 was unanimously approved by the MTA’s board and has the support of Mayor de Blasio, with a few strings attached. The city is expected to pay $3 billion towards the plan, but during the current 2015-2019 plan the city was expected to pay $2.66 billion, but only paid $790 million. (Streetsblog)

Facebook is eyeing 740,000 square feet of office space at the the midtown post office. (6sqft)

Photos: Inside a 19th-century paint factory, before it becomes luxury loft apartments. (Untapped Cities)

A gold coffin at the Metropolitan Museum of Art will be taken back to Egypt after the realization that it had been stolen. (Patch)

If you were at Paul Simon’s last show in Queens, I have some news for you. He’ll be part of Live From Here with Chris Thile on October 26. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: Inside Long Island City’s new public library. (6sqft)

City schools were all set to have a one day work week this year on December 23, but logic has prevailed and students and teachers will get that day off as well, extending winter break from December 21 through January 2. (Patch)

If you’re a big fan of waiting in long lines to get food, Chinese rice noodle roll and congee restaurant Yin Ji Chang Fen has opened an outpost on Bayard St. (Gothamist)

If you define corruption as an illegal act that benefits an individual without punishment because of their office or position, the Brooklyn Borough President’s office is corrupt for their agreement with the Parks Department that allows officials to park wherever they feel in the park that surrounds Borough Hall without consequence. (The City)

Mapping the development boom transforming Crown Heights. (Curbed)

Hart Island’s been in the news a lot lately, today’s update is that there is a concern that it is running out of space as the city’s public burial grounds. Since the Civil War, over a million people have been buried there and in eight to ten years the city needs to find a new place to bury its dead. (6sqft)

As expected, the vape flavor ban is being challenged in court. (amNY)

The city’s grand plans to update and future-proof the Gowanus Canal cleanup have been killed by the EPA. (6sqft)

Enjoy 10 hours in Gowanus (but not in the Gowanus) with this guide. (Brooklyn Based)

It is a misdemeanor under the city’s Right of Way law to fail to yield to pedestrians or cyclists while making a turn after a state appeals court upheld the law as constitutional. (Gothamist)

Where to get drinks in the theater district. (amNY)

The Briefly for September 12, 2019 – The “Most Hipster NY Times Headline of All Time” Edition

Assaults on MTA employees are up, the Met’s facade gets an update, the L train can’t catch a break, get an engagement ring in a vending machine, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

For years, police officers used “I smelled an odor of marijuana” as an excuse to perform a search of any person or a vehicle without a warrant, but judges are finally catching on. (NY Times)

The Times, with the most hipster move of all time, highlights Dumbo before it was cool. (NY Times)

Gem Spa was transformed into a “Shitibank” over the weekend, playing on the rumor that CitiBank wants in on the corner real estate. A design firm created mock ads for the fake bank to highlight what could be if Gem Spa goes out of business. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

8 controversial works of NYC architecture. (Untapped Cities)

Supposedly completed in 1902, the exterior of the Metropolitan Museum of Art is getting its first updates in 117 with The NewOnes, will free Us, four statues that are sitting in niches that were intended to house sculptures but have always been empty. (Untapped Cities)

The Vend at Rockefeller Center might be the oddest collection of vending machines in the city. Red vines? Okay. An engagement ring? Check. Astronaut ice cream? Yes. Ruth Bader Ginsberg action figure? Got that too. (Untapped Cities)

It’s the Feast of San Gennaro starting today, and here’s a guide. (6sqft)

Three giant, terrifying horse statues have arrived at the southeast corner entrance of Central Park. (Untapped Cities)

What a tribute. Between beer ads, the company with the floating billboards on the city’s waterways displayed a 9/11 “NEVER FORGET” message. Thanks, but no thanks. (Gothamist)

That’s almost as weird and tasteless as the video Rudy Guiliani tweeted after the ceremony at ground zero. (Patch)

A bill Governor Cuomo signed into law on Wednesday will offer benefits to more people sickened from their work at Ground Zero and make it easier for responders to claim sick leave and disability pensions. (Patch)

The driver who hit and killed a 10-year-old boy in Brooklyn was allegedly suffering from a seizure when the crash happened. (Gothamist)

Sculptures of DJ Jam Master Jay of Run-D.M.C., Phife Dawg of A Tribe Call Quest, and Prodigy of Mobb Deep will be installed at the Queens Public Library’s Central Library in Jamaica Queens. (amNY)

Assaults on MTA workers are up 39% this year, and the union is using that stat in their contract negotiations. The MTA’s union has been without a contract since May. (amNY)

The L train can’t catch a break this week, with a major delay hitting the trains beleaguered riders every day. What could Thursday have in store? (Brooklyn Paper)

Sacrilege for southerners, but here’s a list of the best BBQ in the city. (The Infatuation)