The Briefly for July 26, 2019 – The “A Green Wave is Declared” Weekend Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, Katz declares victory in the Queens DA recount (Cabán does not concede), a $1k meal, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway disruptions are pretty rough. Rider beware. (Subway Weekender)

Breaking down the city’s “Green Wave” plan: 30 miles of protected bike lanes per year, heavier enforcement on trucks, better intersection design, the bike lane crackdown becomes permanent, and “outreach” to motorists. (Streetsblog)

Part of the problem is the NYPD, which blames cyclists after drivers hit and kill them with their cars. Here’s a video of two NYPD officers incorrectly stating that cyclists should dismount their bikes and walk when crossing certain intersections. For clarification, there is never a situation where a cyclist has to dismount their bike in order to cross an intersection. (Gothamist)

The protests worked. Warren B. Kanders resigned as a vice-chairman of the Whitney after protests singled him out after his tear-gas grenades were used against migrants at the U.S./Mexico border. This follows the museums refusing gifts from the Sackler family, the family of billionaire monsters who were behind OxyContin. (NY Times)

A look at lower Manhattan’s privately owned public spaces and the politics that are slowly turning them from actual public spaces to food halls and retail. (Curbed)

The world’s smallest cinema? The Hoxton Hotel has made a big claim about a tiny movie theater they’ve located inside their elevator vestibule. (Untapped Cities)

Heard about the DoorDash scandal but haven’t gotten the details? Here’s what you need to know about it. Also, if you have a favorite restaurant to order from, consider ordering from them directly to better patronize them. (Grub Street)

Amtrak says they’re on pace with their infrastructure upgrades at Penn Station to be completed by Labor Day, which means fewer disruptions for the Long Island Rail Road. (amNY)

A Lime electric bicycle caught fire after exploding in Rockaway Beach this week. This wasn’t a malfunction, according to the company someone tried to break the bike’s lock and instead punctured the battery, which lead to the malfunction. Yikes. (Curbed)

The city started a Residential Loading Zone Evaluation pilot program, removing parking spaces from certain neighborhoods to give delivery vehicles and for-hire vehicles a place to temporarily stop instead of double parking or parking in bike lanes, which is a nuisance to other drivers but has proven deadly to cyclists. (Streetsblog)

The history of the city’s first drag landmark: the Pyramid Club. (GVSHP)

If you thought this summer is hot, wait until the end of the century, when almost a full month of the year will be over 105 degrees without global intervention against climate change. (Patch)

On election night, it was Tiffany Cabán that declared victory and Melinda Katz that refused to concede. As the results of the recount are imminent, it’s Melinda Katz has declared victory and Tiffany Cabán has refused to concede. (amNY)

No matter the outcome of the Queens DA recount, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s reputation has taken a hit as a result of the campaign juxtaposing her point-of-view against the much more progressive Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

The election results won’t be certified until Tuesday, but sources put Katz’s lead over Caban at 60 votes. Next stop: court. (Politico)

Got a love of Korean food and a thousand dollars you don’t want? Atomix’s ten-course tasting meal with wine pairings will take care of you with a cost of $928 after taxes but before tip. (Eater)

The social and cultural Puerto Rican history of the East Village in the wake of the governor of Puerto Rico resigning. (6sqft)

A needed change could be coming to the city’s elections, but it has to be approved as a ballot measure for November’s elections. A look at that and the other ballot initiatives coming our way. (Patch)

This is what Manhattan’s first public beach will look like. (6sqft)

The mayor and city council are pushing for two weeks of paid vacation for every employee, small businesses are pushing back. (Gotham Gazette)

A threat of gentrification can cause stress in a neighborhood. The story of a Sean Price mural and a kosher restaurant in Crown Heights illustrates that story and that stress perfectly. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 6th Annual Macaulay Culkin Show Summer Comedy Festival at The Bell House is bringing something to the festival that has never happened before. Macaulay Culkin. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The men who poured water on NYPD officers are facing a tougher punishment than the man whose chokehold lead to Eric Garner’s death. Why? (NY Times)

The place that gave the world rainbow bagels was seized by the state’s tax department for not paying almost a million dollars in taxes. (Eater)

Some of the city’s private schools are joining with yeshivas to fight the state’s demands that their students be taught basic English, math, and science. (Gothamist)

Who hasn’t had the dream of finding an expensive work of art in a thrift shop? A drawing in a Queens thrift shop turns out to be from Austrian Expressionist Egon Schiele and worth over $200,000. (Patch)

Eating weeds? Yup. Meet the former corporate lawyer supplying the city’s top restaurant with weeds to be used in dishes in the city’s top restaurants. (Viewing NYC)

Diving into the 40-year history of the Chinatown Ice Cream Factory. (amNY)

The most exciting restaurant pop-ups to check out, some of them end their run this weekend. (Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Lillia for the photo of Hellgate Farms!

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The Briefly for June 24, 2019 – The “In Defense of a New York City Summer” Edition

What was on and what was off the state’s legislative agenda, the summer forecast, the Mermaid Parade, pity the real estate investors, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions are over, just in time for late-night weekday disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Queens Democrats, you have the chance to vote for your next District Attorney primary on Tuesday. Last minute dropouts, endorsements, and ads are setting the candidates apart from each other. (Politico)

Candidate Tiffany Cabán is following the AOC playbook to a possible Queens DA election victory. It helps she’s also received AOC’s endorsement. (NY Times)

In 2017, lead was found in the water fountains in multiple city schools. In a small investigation in four schools, WNYC found high levels of lead-paint contamination in the city’s schools. (Gothamist)

When was your last true “what the hell” subway moment? How about this one caught on video with an argument between a man holding a gun and another holding a bat? (@SubwayCreatures)

The summer’s long-range weather predictions have been made for the city, and it’s gonna be a hot year. (Patch)

In defense of summer in the city. (Gothamist)

There is a small ring of people stealing the earnings from Lyft and Uber drivers across the city using the drivers’ own phones to take the money. (Gothamist)

The ten oldest theaters in Times Square. (Untapped Cities)

After about 200 shows, Broadway’s ‘Be More Chill’ is set to close on August 11. (amNY)

Stargazing isn’t impossible in the city you just have to know where to look. (Atlas Obscura)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health includes a Little Italy favorite, a USPS cafeteria (which is also this week’s winner for most violations), and multiple others. (Patch)

If you’ve got the bug and are looking to run for elected office in the city, here’s how it just got a little easier. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Cardi B was indicted from a fight in a strip club was last year. She rejected a plea deal that would have required no jail time and was paired with reduced charges in April. (amNY)

Your guide to summer in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s a look at 12 things the Democrat-dominated state’s legislature accomplished this year. (NY Times)

The list of accomplishments in the state legislature looks impressive, but here’s what didn’t make the agenda. (Gothamist)

One thing that was left off the legislative agenda was the mayor’s attempts to change the specialized high school entrance exams. Consider the effort dead, with multiple Democrats voting against it in committee and it never seeing a floor vote. (NY Times)

What happened to the automatic voter registration bill? A “typo” derailed the effort and it will have to be taken up in the next legislative session. (Gothamist)

Maybe electric bikes shouldn’t be allowed in bike lanes? Wait, what?This makes sense if you’re the mayor, the rest of us will be left to scratch our heads. (Patch)

A body was found floating off Pier 36 on the Lower East Side. The body wasn’t identified outside of being a male Asian in his 30s. (The Villager)

The 14th St Busway, scheduled to take hold on July 1, was hit with a lawsuit by residents of Chelsea and the West Village. The lawsuit says the city hasn’t properly studied how banning cars will impact the surrounding neighborhoods. (Curbed)

Here are the details about what’s changing about marijuana in New York after the state’s decriminalization bill. (amNY)

The MTA is reorganizing this summer, but since the governor didn’t put one of the mayor’s board recommendations to the state senate, the city will have one less representative during the discussions. It’s possible that it was a simple mistake, but it’s also possible that this is another part of the rich tapestry that is the feud between Cuomo and de Blasio. (Politico)

Video: You’ve ridden the subways, the buses, the ferries, but have you ridden the Roosevelt Island tram? Here’s the history behind the city’s unique travel option. (Viewing NYC)

If you savor a truly awful smell, the New York Botanical Garden’s corpse flower appears just about ready to bloom. It hits peak bloom for 24-36 hours, so if you’re looking to savor the smell of what is described as rotting meat, keep an eye on the flower’s status. (Gothamist)

The Nautilus, a new interactive art installation near the Seaport, is like a giant space-age musical instrument using light poles you can touch to produce sounds. The installation will be there through September 10. (Time Out)

The Coney Island Brewery, aptly located in Coney Island, will be expanding in August. (Brooklyn Paper)

This year’s Mermaid Parade in pictures. (BrooklynVegan)

and more pics. (amNY)

You can uncover your eyes. The Flying Wallendas successfully made the tightrope walk 25 stories above midtown. (NY Times)

Everyone pity the real estate investors, who have taken time out of their busy schedules to whine to any media outlet that will listen about how they won’t be able to deregulate rent-controlled apartments or unreasonably raise rents. (Splinter)

The city’s best cold noodle dishes. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for June 20, 2019 – The “Legal Marijuana is a Dead Cause in New York State” Edition

NY1 is hit with an age and gender discrimination lawsuit, the electric scooter and ebike bill passed, most Ricky’s locations are closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Port Authority’s plan to build an AirTrain to LaGuardia has one key flaw: the MTA. Comptroller Scott Stringer released a report that states the MTA simply isn’t ready, to no one’s surprise. (amNY)

It’ll be hard to go anywhere in the city towards the end of the month without spotting a rainbow flag. NYC & Co released a list of the buildings across all boroughs that will be lit with rainbows and their schedules. Some, like City Hall, will be lit from June 10 – 30, while some like Bloomberg’s Headquarters and MSG will be lit on June 30. (Curbed)

Five anchorwomen are suing NY1 for age and gender discrimination. The lawsuit betrays the image NY1 wants the city to believe. While Pat Kiernan’s 20th anniversary with the channel was celebrated on-air, while Roma Torre’s 25th anniversary was marked by nothing. Ms. Torre’s salary also happens to be half of Mr. Kiernan’s. (NY Times)

Legal marijuana is dead for this legislative session. According to Liz Krueger, the state senator who sponsored the bill, they “ran out of time.” (Gothamist)

The reimagining of Penn Station has begun with new entrances on 7th Ave. (Untapped Cities)

Did you know that subway elevator attendants still exist? The elevator ride at the St. Nicolas Ave station rides the same 181-foot route all night, non-stop. Gothamist rode shotgun for a full overnight shift. (Gothamist)

The Culinary Institute of America is starting an Anthony Bourdain scholarship. (Grub Street)

Following up on that “beach” Battery Park photo from earlier this week, meet Brian Shea, the master planner of Battery Park City. (Untapped Cities)

Ricky’s may be closing their NYC stores with the exception of two. Even the city’s innovator when it comes to wigs, hair dye, sex toys, makeup and more isn’t immune to the Amazon effect. (Jezebel)

17 tourist trap restaurants that are actually good. (Eater)

Get out into the world. That’s the advice from Wigstock founder Lady Bunny, who worries that the LGBTQ community is abandoning their safe spaces in favor of social media. (amNY)

10 essential tools every apartment should have. Time to hit your neighborhood hardware store. (StreetEasy)

Would it surprise you to learn that a confusing bar slash “>bar slash vegetarian restaurant was also a late night dance club is in Bushwick? (Gothamist)

If you met Giblet on the street in the East Village, you’d know. Giblet is a friendly, one-year-old pig that seems to melt everyone who sees it’s heart. (Bedford + Bowery)

Jennifer Lopez an Alex Rodriguez sold the apartment where A-Rod’s viral toilet photo was taken. They have since purchased blinds. (Curbed)

There were hundreds of summonses issued during the city’s crackdown on measles, but only one fine issued and that fine was the result of someone who skipped their hearing. (Gothamist)

The next artist to head for a Broadway residency is Regina Spektor. (amNY)

An argument for why Brooklynites should be voting for surrogate judges on June 25. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A guide to Tuesday’s Queens DA election. (Gothamist)

Does any New Yorker not have nightmares about an air conditioner falling on them in the sidewalk? Even if there’s only one record of a falling air conditioner in the last five years, you should be following directions putting that thing in your window. (Patch)

The legislature passed a bill to remove the electric scooter and bike ban, but don’t celebrate just yet. The city still has to write its own rules and regulations before they’re completely legal to ride. (Mashable)

Once the police and Walmart show up to support your cause, can you still claim to be part of the counter-culture? The Pride March is often criticized for the priority given to corporations, the party atmosphere, and police involvement. This is where the Reclaim Pride Coalition’s Queer Liberation March steps in, promising an attitude similar to the original Pride March. The Queer Liberation March happens 9am on the day of the Pride March and has banned floats, corporate involvement, and asked for minimal NYPD involvement with no barricades to allow people to join and leave the protest at will. The Pride March bans anyone from spontaneously joining. (NY Times)

Okay, so you’re in Downtown Brooklyn and, honestly, it can be difficult to know what the hell there is to do around there outside of walk around. Here’s a guide of what to do and eat. (amNY)

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