The Briefly for November 15, 2019 – The “Why Do Tourists Love the M&M Store?” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA will pay $250 million to get $200 million back, the next great pastrami sandwich, Hart Island will become a park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s planned subway disruptions are non-existent on the numbered lines, but hits the E, R, L, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The MTA is considering a restructuring “transformation plan” that will end up firing thousands of administrative jobs in an effort to save money, but will still end up with a $426 million deficit in 2023. (amNewYork)

While the MTA fires thousands, they’ll be making way for 500 police officers. The cops will cost $250 million and are theoretically partially financed by the $200 million they will be saving through anti-fare evasion efforts, or to put it another way over 18 million subway rides. What a deal! We only have to spend $250 million to get back $200 million. (Streetsblog)

This is the real question. Why do tourists love the M&M store so much? (/r/AskNYC)

How can you make ordering lunch worse? Ask Sweetgreen, whose “3.0” location manages to lower the bar even further while you pay $15 for a salad. (Eater)

The story that started with the most questionable Halloween decorations has a surprise ending of honest conversation. (NY Times)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency Plan, which will protect the Lower East Side from the rising ocean and storms like Superstorm Sandy passed City Council, but there is already a lawsuit planned to try to stop the phased construction along the 2.4 miles of shore. Leading the charge is Arthur Schwartz, the same lawyer who tried to sue the 14th St busway out of existence. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball signed a deal with Nike that would have shut out multiple businesses surrounding Yankee stadium from selling Yankees gear, effectively killing them completely, but after an rallying effort from the Yankees’ front office, places like Stan the Man’s will be included in the MLB deal. (amNewYork)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite for early AIDS patients, stillborn children, the disenfranchised, the unknown, and Veterans that dates back to the Civil War, will be transferred from the Department of Corrections to the Parks Department. As part of the bill passed by the City Council, the Department of Transportation will be charged with creating transportation to the 101-acre island. (Curbed)

In response to the candy and churro-related arrests happening in the subways, the mayor asked the MTA to consider designated “vending areas” in subway stations. Could it be that de Blasio’s never-ending feud with Governor Cuomo actually spurs the mayor to stand up for the people of the city? (Politico)

The mayor has asked some 18,000 city employees, 15,000 of them FDNY, to be a part of the new Outreach NYC program. The program will report unsheltered homeless people in an attempt to connect them with voluntary outreach programs. (amNewYork)

An 85-foot mural by Keith Haring that once adorned the halls of Grace House, a youth organization in the Upper West Side, sold for $3.9 million. The church who owned the land sold the building and removed the mural in worry that it could have been destroyed in renovations. (NY Times)

Facebook is moving into 1.5 million square feet of office in Hudson Yards next year. While this isn’t mentioned in the article, I assume that means that Apple won the bidding war for space in the Farley Building inside the post office on 34th. (amNewYork)

Via is now offering $15 rideshares from LaGuardia to Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn and $20 rides to Staten Island and the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Our airports are the most expensive in the country, from the flights to parking to coffee. (Patch)

Why not add ice skating to that list? The TWA Hotel will be installing an ice skating rink at JFK airport. (amNewYork)

Photos: A first look inside the Waldorf Astoria’s historic conversion. (6sqft)

Attorney General Letitia James is suing B&H Photo for failing to pay $7.3 million of taxes when offering instant rebates. When offering an instant rebate, the law says you are taxed on the pre-rebate price, but B&H had been collecting taxes on the post-discounted price. (amNewYork)

A teenager was arrested and charged with three counts each of hate crime assault, aggravated harassment, and harassment for throwing eggs as a synagogue and Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers. (Gothamist)

Comings and goings from Broadway: Going is Tootsie, coming is Woman in Black, KPOP, and cuts to West Side Story. (amNewYork)

Scooter and Pete are two adorable new Red Panda fur babies making their at the Prospect Park Zoo. There are photos and video. (Gothamist)

What’s going on with chicken parm and horny singles? (Eater)

There’s a deadly drug-resistant fungus called Candida auris. More than 800 cases have been reported in the country and half of them have been in New York. A list of hospitals, long-care nursing homes, and hospice units that have been exposed is available. (amNewYork)

The mayor held a town hall and you can be sure that for any criticism levied against him or his administration, he had someone else to blame and in a few occasions it was the audience. (Gothamist)

The NYPD arrested and charged Michael Hall with attempted murder, two counts of arson, one count of criminal possession of a dangerous weapon, two counts of attempted assault, one count of menacing and harassment in connection to a series of fires at the NYCHA complex, the Louis Pink Houses, that occurred over a span of six months. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s next great pastrami sandwich is from Hometown Bar-B-Que in Industry City. (Eater)

The 16 most exciting Caesar Salads in the city. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for November 13, 2019 – The “Staten Island Revisits Secession from New York City” Edition

The city’s first hair discrimination case is settled, Penn Station is about to get worse, a 22.5-foot arm appears in Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Queens has a new Boulevard of Death, and it’s Jewel Ave. (Streetsblog)

The first hair discrimination case in the city has been resolved. Sally Hershberger and partner Sharon Dorram lost a $70k lawsuit after former workers were told that their hairstyles didn’t fit a dress code, specifically that “afros and box-braid hairstyles did not reflect the upscale image of the neighborhood.” (The Root)

Staten Island wants to secede from NYC. (Gothamist)

Penn Station’s multi-year renovation means that the already depressing station will become even more dour when it loses about 17 businesses including Shake Shack, Magnolia Bakery, two Starbucks, a Pretty and Godiva. (Eater)

Can an opinion be wrong? In the case of the “Can We Talk About Womanspreading?” opinion piece that ran in the Daily News, the answer is yes. Claire Lampen read it, so you don’t have to. (Gothamist)

Last night’s sunset was spectacular. (@mikiodo)

What’s the point of adding 500 cops to the subways to police fare evasion? Rationally minded folks aren’t the only ones asking that question, the MTA’s board is also starting to ask that same question. (Gothamist)

More cops of better service? The number of crimes on the subway are down, no matter what fantasy Governor Cuomo wants to create to justify spending more than half a billion dollars on new subway cops. The governor if you ask 100 people on the subway if they want more cops on the subways, 75 would say yes, so amNewYork went down and started asking. (amNewYork)

Dr. Sun Yat-sen received a monument in Chinatown at Columbus Park, adding Dr Sun’s name to the park’s plaza as well. He was a pioneer in the reform of China in 1911 and the monument has “All Under Heaven Are Equal” inscribed on the pedestal. (amNewYork)

This week is the best week for forest bathing. What’s forest bathing? I don’t really know. It’s kind of like taking a walk in the trees but different? (Gothamist)

The East Side Costal Resiliency (ESCR) project is headed for a full City Council vote on Thursday, which will decide the future of the East River Park and how the Lower East Side is protected from storms and the rising sea. (Curbed)

There are 40 NYCHA developments without gas, some without gas since April. City Comptroller Scott Stringer argues that if gas is not supplied for an extended period of time that the NYCHA should be offering food reimbursement and monthly bill abatements to compensate. (amNewYork)

Is the one minute you can spend inside the “Infinity Mirrored Room” at David Zwirner in Chelsea worth the potentially very long wait? (NY Times)

Looking for restaurants serving Thanksgiving dinner this year? (Patch)

How to choose an apartment based on the school district. (StreetEasy)

With the help of Lin-Manuel Miranda and some Hamilton collaborators, the Drama Book Shop will be opening its new location on W 39th in the spring and operated by the company that operates Hamilton’s gift shop. (NY Times)

Third Ave in Sunset Park between 20th and 30th Streets underneath the Gowanus Expressway is becoming a hub for RV parking. (amNewYork)

A rezoning in Woodside was given the thumbs up by Community Board 2 that will bring 60 apartments to 52nd St near Queens Blvd with parking, a community facility, and commercial space. (Sunnyside Post)

Last weekend saw a spike in hate crimes reported in Brooklyn, most anti-Semitic in nature. (amNewYork)

The National Grid / Governor Cuomo war of words hasn’t ended. The governor once again raised the threat of revoking National Grid’s license to operate in the southern part of the state. (NY Times)

Someone broke into the conductor cab on a 1 train and bean screaming “I have a fucking gun!” into the train’s PA system. Chaos ensued, as you might expect, but no one was found with a gun and no injuries were reported. (Gothamist)

RIP Charlie Gordon. Astoria’s Sandwich King, who established Sal, Kris & Charlie’s Deli in Astoria. (LIC Post)

Unity is a 22.5-foot bronze sculpture of an arm pointing towards the sky in Downtown Brooklyn by Hank Willis Thomas. The piece is “in homage to, and celebration of, the unique and multifaceted character of the borough of Brooklyn. There is one finger raised, but it’s not the Brooklyn salute you might assume. It’s the index finger. (Untapped New York)

Hall & Oates is hitting the road and MSG is on their list for February 28. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Single-Story Project,” from Adam Friedberg on view at the Center for Architecture captures 100 one-story buildings in the East Village and Lower East Side. It seems almost impossible that with the city as dense as it is that there are that many one-story buildings remaining. (Curbed)

Take a look inside Norah Jones’ $8 million circa-1843 Cobble Hill home, which includes a master suite terrace and a hot tub and pool in the backyard. (Curbed)

Are your neighbors’ security cameras spying on you? (NY Times)

The hottest restaurants in Queens this month. (Eater)

The Briefly for October 3, 2019 – The “Really Screwed by the Hudson Yards” Edition

The 14th Street busway begins today, NYC schools ban bacon, RIP Ming the tiger, the East River Park renovation plans changed, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

New York Comic Con starts today, so get ready for the subways to get more weird and awesome through Sunday. (amNY)

Say goodbye to bologna, salami, pepperoni, or bacon in city schools as they have banned all processed meats. (Grub Street)

If you think you understand the challenges of driving a city bus, see the world through their eyes. (amNY)

These are the Forever 21 stores expected to close in NYC. (Patch)

If you’ve felt screwed by the Hudson Yards, now you can make it a reality. Wolfgang & Hite has released a series of sex toys shaped like the buildings in the Hudson Yards. Yes, there’s a Vessel, and yes, it’s a butt-plug. (Curbed)

Today is the first day of the 14th St busway. Let’s find out if this makes the buses of 14th St any more tenable. (amNY)

New York state is on track to meet its goals to end the AIDS epidemic in the state by 2020. (NY Times)

The Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade is safe for 2019, thanks to the Heart of Chelsea Veterinary Group’s sponsorship. Let’s all look forward to seeing all those adorable pups in their cute outfits! (Bedford + Bowery)

Where did all those pedal-assisted Citi Bikes go? (Gothamist)

Staten Island Democratic Congressperson Max Rose has announced that he supports the impeachment inquiry, ending a week-long moment of indecision. (Politico)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez announced her opposition to Mayor de Blasio’s Riker’s Island community jail replacement program. (Politico)

It’s hard not to see the Greater New York Hospital Association’s donations of a million dollars the New York State’s Democratic Party and a Medicaid reimbursement increase of $140 million as quid pro quo. (NY Times)

The mayor wants to take credit for the decline in poverty in the city, but the truth isn’t as easy as he wants to believe it is. (Politico)

14 chefs give their opinion on where to eat on a day off. (Grub Street)

What if instead of spending on police preventing fare evasion, more money was spent on subsidizing low-income New Yorkers’ subway rides? (Gothamist)

Kevin Dennard hit and killed a homeless man who went by “Pops” with his car on Tuesday morning. Dennard has two previous convictions for drunk driving and admitted he had a few beers before hitting and killing Pops. Pops was the 83rd pedestrian to be killed by drivers this year. (Gothamist)

For those of you who love apartment-porn, here’s a $12.5 million townhouse with a 40-foot pool, a terrace, and a two-car garage on the Upper East Side. (6sqft)

Seeing sukkahs in Williamsburg around the time of the Jewish holiday Sukkot isn’t strange, but seeing them built in the middle of the street is very out of the ordinary. (Streetsblog)

A woman committed suicide by subway in Bensonhurst on Tuesday morning at Bay Parkway and 86th Street. Due to the elevated tracks, the FDNY was involved in washing down the street below. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

RIP James Robinson, who saw a gap in ambulance coverage in Bed-Stuy in the 80s and filled the gap with his own volunteer service. (NY Times)

The plans for renovations at East River Park as part of the East Side Coastal Resiliency project have changed and the park will not close completely for three years in favor of slower work that will only require portions of the park to close at any moment. (Gothamist)

A deep look at Rafael Espinal Jr’s story from an English Language instructor for a GED program to City Council to a run at the Brooklyn Borough President’s office. (Kings County Politics)

Home prices are skyrocketing near these five subway stops. Four in Manhattan, one in the Bronx. (Patch)

Did you know America’s oldest public golf course is in the Bronx? (Welcome2TheBronx)

Schneps Media is buying amNY from Newsday. This won’t change my inclusion of their stories in The Briefly, but as Schneps Media continues to buy local news outlets, we will continue to lose what made those publications unique. Schneps owns amNY, QNS.com, the Brooklyn Paper, Brownstoner, Gay City News, Carribean Life, El Correo NY, Bronx Weekly, The Villager, Chelsea Now, Manhattan Express and over a dozen smaller neighborhood-focused outlets. 33 newspapers, 28 magazines, and 20 websites. Media consolidation of this nature is not healthy for the city. There has been no announcement that newsroom jobs are safe, as was made in the New York Magazine and Vox merger.

Now you can read the same stories on even more websites. (Brooklyn Paper, amNY, The Villager, and QNS.com)

Finally, the MTA will install netting underneath the raised subway tracks in Queens that seem to be regularly falling apart as part of the $51.5 billion MTA Capital Plan. (QNS.com)

Ming, the 400-pound tiger who lived in a Harlem housing project and discovered in 2003, has died at the age of nineteen. (NY Times)

The best places in Central Park to see fall foliage. (6sqft)