The Briefly for July 19, 2020 – The “Phase Four Starts Monday” Sunday Edition

Today’s NYC news digest: A look at phase four, Governor Cuomo’s new rules for bars, how to see the comet Neowise before it disappears, Metro-North has an awful new superhero & more

Hey! The Briefly is still a one-man hobby, and I overslept on Friday!

Phase four will start on Monday, but it’s been modified. Initially, phase four was supposed to include indoor venues, building on phase three’s indoor dining. No indoor activities are included in phase four. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The official list of what qualifies for phase four: Higher Education, Pre-K to Grade 12 Schools, Low-Risk Outdoor Arts & Entertainment, Low-Risk Indoor Arts & Entertainment, Media Production, Professional Sports Competitions With No Fans, and Malls. The indoor arts and entertainment is pertaining to museums and galleries and not seeing your favorite band play for a dozen people. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1)

New York City has public-drinking laws, of course, which include the regulation of open containers. Some New Yorkers have treated the city’s temporary takeout-cocktail laws as a cause for celebration, an opening of the streets. New Orleans meets Manhattan. But not me. While bars and restaurants reopen, the lines between which people get to enjoy these laws and which people do not are clearer than ever before. There are no alfresco dinner parties in the projects.
– Christian Rodriguez, Who Really Gets to Drink Outside in New York? for Eater

The rollout for Governor Cuomo’s new rules for bars and restaurants was a bit shaky. There’s a new three-strike system, where noncompliance with to-go alcohol mandates or social distancing will earn an establishment up to three strikes before having its liquor license suspended, but also egregious violations could mean an immediate suspension. The new rules will mean that you’ll likely see a few small bullshit food items handed out alongside a to-go drink. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Coverage of closing restaurants:

An ode to Odessa. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

What to order from Angkor before it closes on August 1. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Hunky Dory is reopening, but without tipping. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Lilia is reopening for outdoor dining in Williamsburg and there’s already a multi-week wait. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Dirt Candy is back with takeout and outdoor dining. (Scott Lynch and Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Smorgasburg is coming back too, with takeout only. Does takeout exist from an outdoor tent? (Erika Adams for Eater)

Grand Central Terminal’s food hall is open again. With no possible way to participate in outdoor dining at Grand Central, is it the only place in the city with indoor dining? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

20 Michelin-starred restaurants that are open for outdoor dining. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The Bronx’s Little Italy on Arthur Avenue, aka “Piazza di Belmont” is taking over the street for most of the weekend over the summer. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

The 9 best streets for outdoor dining in NYC this summer. Glad to see Arthur Ave is at the top of this list. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

How to see the comet Neowise in the city. You’ve got about a week to try to see it before it leaves for 6,000 years. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The mayor is calling for all 1,349 curfew protesters to face charges. Curfew violations are a Class B misdemeanor and punishable with up to a $500 fine and three months in jail. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

One bad take deserves another. Here’s a bad take from Governor Cuomo, who opposes a billionaire’s tax because he says the ultra-rich will just leave New York. New York has 118 billionaires who increased their wealth by $77 billion over the four months of staying at home. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

A review of Brooklyn Noosh on Atlantic Ave in Brooklyn and it’s “secret garden” for outdoor dining with a recommendation for the Flamin’ Hot Cheeto Wings. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

How to order takeout from Rao’s Italian food in East Harlem since landing one of the restaurant’s ten coveted tables is out of most of our grasp. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A fascinating question. Without food service jobs to subsidize their lives and art, what will happen to New York’s creative class? (Deepti Hajela for AP)

Metro-North now has its own extremely lame superhero. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The New York Botanical Garden is opening up on July 28. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to eat outside in the West Village. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for June 12, 2020 – The “Mr Mayor, Unlock This Playground” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The “blood in the streets” protest, the NYPD refuse to be interviewed online for the CCRB, a call to stop the Gowanus rezoning, and more

Today – Low: 62˚ High: 83˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 58˚ High: 73˚

Has the pandemic and protests made you think about starting getting involved on a hyper-local level? Maybe you’ve thought about starting a neighborhood association? The Times breaks down how to do it. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

Do you know the Muffin House? The Muffin House? The Muffin House. The roots of the nooks and crannies of Thomas’ English Muffins are in New York. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Governor Cuomo says that pools and playgrounds across the state can reopen. The city’s pools and playgrounds remain closed. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

In the 1970s, the NYPD’s unions distributed a flyer called “WELCOME TO FEAR CITY” meant to keep tourists out of New York City, teaching them how to survive with the city’s crime. A new version of “WELCOME TO FEAR CITY” has begun to be distributed, but with the twist of how to survive the police when protesting in New York. (Jeremiah Moss for Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The City has created a searchable memorial of nearly 1,000 New York City victims of Covid-19. Right now it only covers a little over 4% of the city’s victims, but they are working with journalism schools to expand the memorials one person at a time. (The City)

Governor Cuomo is deciding to use the political capital he earned on defending statues of Christopher Columbus, saying Columbus represents Italian-American pride. This argument seems to pop up more and more often, making me think it’s not a matter of if but when the statue of Columbus in Columbus Circle is taken down. (Zack Fink for NY1)

People are calling for Police Seargeant Terri Napolitano to be fired for sharing a racist message on Facebook which showed President Obama being lynched with Hillary Clinton next in line for hanging. The Office of Court Administration suspended her for 30 days without pay, took away her gun, and launched an investigation. Napolitano has since deleted her social media accounts. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

It shouldn’t be a surprise, but Manhattan’s rental vacancy rate is the highest it’s been in fourteen years. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

“Unless people are interfering with a Barclays Center event, or there are safety concerns, we would not take action to have someone removed from our plaza.” Unfortunately, the NYPD has had a different opinion about how people should use the plaza outside the Barclays Center. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Jahmel Leach is a teenager who was tasered in the face by the NYPD. After the NYPD tasered and arrested the minor, they never notified his family he was in custody because he was tall and they thought he was an adult. The mayor says he’s “really troubled” by what happened to Leach but hasn’t vowed any specific actions he’s going to take to get answers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

America has historically sought to arrest and prosecute its way through community issues that could be dealt with by understanding the history of this nation, our states & our community. Frustration comes from a lot of these things being ignored in impoverished communities: education, finances and health services. COVID-19 has exposed these inequities. So what will the city do beyond policing? We should build a comprehensive plan that addresses these shortfalls and provide the community with a say in how it defines the safety of its own neighborhoods.
– Taylonn Murphy Sr. for Gothamist, New York City Must Actually Invest In Black Communities—Right Now

How to celebrate Pride in quarantine. (Gabrielle Lenart for Brooklyn Based)

Phase one of reopening has begun, but there has been an uptick in Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations, which trails about two weeks behind New York City’s massive protests. We are still under the threshold for phase two. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Politicians in Queens are calling to make a 1.3 mile stretch of 34th Avenue in Jackson Heights permanently car-free. (Steven Vago for Streetsblog)

Render Stetson-Shanahan was found guilty of manslaughter for brutally killing Carolyn Bush, at their apartment on Sept. 28, 2016. He avoided murder charges by testifying that he had a mental lapse. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

If you’ve wondered why there hasn’t been a leader to step up and speak for all of the city’s protesters, it because there isn’t one. The city isn’t being led by one voice, but by the voices of many. (Jan Ransom and Annie Correal for NY Times)

“The commissioner held a Twitter Q&A on Thursday morning, but took no questions.” Great job Commissioner Shea, great job. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The award for most questionable headline and lead image combination goes to “Gay Pride embraces its roots by teaming up with U.S. black activists” by amNewYork Metro.

Congressmembers Max Rose and Yvette D. Clarke along with Mayor de Blasio ar asking the military to rename General Lee Avenue in Brooklyn’s Fort Hamilton army base. (Michael Gold for NY Times)

The city will spend $3 million to helping 100 restaurants in the city forced to close by the novel coronavirus pandemic subsidize paying 1,000 furloughed or fired workers at $20 per hour for at least six weeks and serve 53,000 free meals to people in communities hardest hit by the virus. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

A dumpling automat is opening in the East Village, confusingly named Brooklyn Dumpling Shop. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The city will spend $3.65 million to give roughly 3,300 young people in paid 6 to 8-week online summer youth programs this year. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

As a resident of New York City, I am writing to demand that a moratorium be placed on proceeding with the Gowanus Rezone Proposal, which incorporates parts of Boerum Hill, Park Slope, and Carroll Gardens, until the city’s needs can be reassesed. In the wake of COVID-19, with both the city and state budgets in crisis, the economy in free fall, and as many as 20% of Americans having lost their jobs—including a disproportionate number of people of color— this plan is woefully out of step with what the city needs right now, or what it can afford.
– Voice of Gowanus, Demand a Moratorium on the Gowanus Rezone

The Alliance for Quality Education and The Dignity in Schools Campaign NY today denounced the mayor’s comments and refusal to remove NYPD officers from public schools. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

The Yankees are distributing $50,000 in scholarships among five different college-bound seniors, at $10,000 apiece, with one student coming from each borough through The Stonewall Scholars initiative. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Demonstrations and protests continue into week three as protesters spilled red paint to represent “blood in the streets” on Thursday, symbolizing “the blood militant forces such as the police cause black people to shed.” It created a powerful image. (Debora Fougere for NY1)

How to calculate how much rent you can afford right now. (Localize.City)

1,109 Civilian Complaint Review Board investigations are awaiting police officer interviews, but the police union will not allow officers to be interviewed online. What bullshit. (Eileen Grench for The City)

Where to get a restaurant-made picnic spread in the city. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Thanks to reader Jenny for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 29, 2020 – The “Cherry Blossom Drone Footage Will Relax You” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The MTA attack Mayor de Blasio over the city’s homeless, large crowds violate social distancing at a rabbi’s funeral, the beer delivery guide, and more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 56˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Unemployed, A Brooklyn Bartender’s Lament. (Hope Morawa for New York Cliché)

The best bike rides in Brooklyn according to Jacqueline VanDusen, who has biked them all. (Nicole Davis for Brooklyn Based)

If you were trying to successfully reopen the state, would you think to invite James Dolan or Jeff Wilpon to the panel, the geniuses who have given us the modern Knicks and the Mets? (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A drones eye view of the Brooklyn Botanical Garden’s cherry blossoms. (Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

The MTA is changing its policies to be more strict when it comes to the homeless population. It will no longer allow shopping carts in stations and no one will be allowed to spend more than an hour on the platform before they are asked to leave. Clearly whoever wrote these guidelines has never tried to leave Greenpoint at 3 am on a Wednesday night. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The Mayor should get out of his car and into the subways so he can see what is really going on and solve the problem of his own making.” -MTA spokesperson Abbey Collins. The mayor has failed to live up to his own standards and has blown his own self-imposed deadlines to place 2,500 of the city’s homeless population into hotel rooms by April 20. He missed that deadline by 1,500. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Add Nathan’s to the list of companies who returned their federal small-business loans. Nathan’s had received $1.2 million. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

RIP Tina Girouard, a 1970s SoHo art scene pioneer. (Randy Kennedy for NY Times)

New York’s unemployment offices are backlogged and 400,000 New Yorkers are still waiting for their MArch unemployment checks. The state has a 3,000 person staff who have delivered $3.1 billion to about 1.5 million people so far. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

It hasn’t been an easy road, some errors from the unemployment office resulted in personal information, including social security numbers, being mailed to the wrong people. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Rough Trade NYC shut down music sales when the store was shut down. A month later and they’re back to selling music, online only. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Worried that your fluffy buddy may have COVID-19? Here comes the NYC COVID-19 Pet Hotline. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

What’s open? Here are a few maps showing what’s open in a few neighborhoods across the city. (6sqft)

Veniero’s and Veselka in the East Village will be open for delivery starting Friday. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

RIP Dr. Lorna Breen, medical director of the emergency department at New York-Presbyterian Allen Hospital in Manhattan, who died by suicide. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

At the East end of Delancey St there’s an N95 mask vending machine. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Half of NYC knows someone who died from COVID-19, according to a new Siena Research Institute poll. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

Nancy Blum, whose beautiful mosaic work adorns the 28th St station n the 6 line is releasing ornate coloring book pages for free. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Mayor de Blasio’s special councils to help reopen the city are small businesses; larger businesses; public health and healthcare; arts, culture and tourism; labor; nonprofits and social services; faith-based; and education and vocational training. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Apartment Porn: Inside Sister Parish’s $3.5 million Fifth Avenue Maisonette. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

Every student in kindergarten lower and middle schools will either meet standards/need improvement system when it comes to grades this year, essentially a more polite pass/fail. If you “need improvement” you’ll be receiving it in summer school. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Squibb Bridge, which connects Brooklyn Bridge Park to the Brooklyn Promenade, will be op en on May 4, after replacing the previous incarnation, which was structurally flawed. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

CityMD Urgent Care is now offering walk-in tests for COVID-19 at all of their locations across New York City. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

Photos: The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds flyover. (Photos by Dean Moses)

Not everyone was a fan. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Is New York City a city full of idiots? The flyover, which was supposed to be in tribute to the region’s medical workers, must have been so spectacular that a whole lot of New Yorkers forgot social distancing guidelines. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Brooklyn parents say underground yeshiva classes are flourishing in Borough Park — but cops closed a 311 grievance about one in just 16 minutes in the middle of the night. (Reuven Blau and Yoav Gonen for The City)

The NYPD had to disperse a crowd attending the funeral of Rabbi Chaim Mertz. The mayor appeared in person to oversee, as multiple funerals in Brooklyn’s Jewish communities have required NYPD intervention in the last two months. I give the mayor a lot of shit on a regular occasion, but attempting to enforce social distancing without being called an anti-Semite in this situation was absolutely impossible. This kind of gathering and what happened with Tuesday’s flyover are both completely preventable, but no one called the NYPD or mayor nazis or compared them to Wilhelm Frick for dispersing crowds after the flyover. (Liam Stack for NY Times)

Photos of the funeral’s crowd size and density are very different from the photos of the flyover crowds. (@ReuvenBlau)

The signs are still pointing to an Andrew Yang mayoral bid in 2021. (Matt Stevens for NY Times)

The beer delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thank you to reader JoAnn for today’s featured flyover photo!