The Briefly for October 4, 2019 – The “Should We Ban Cars in All of Manhattan?” Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, the flavor vape ban has been blocked in court, the hottest restaurants in Brooklyn, an idiot climbed into the lion’s enclosure at the Bronx Zoo, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Check out this weekend’s subway disruptions and scheduled closures before heading out. (Subway Weekender)

F&F Pizzeria is the city’s latest slice shop with a pedigree. (Eater)

The Hunters Point Library is finally open. (New York YIMBY)

The $41 million library has a flaw: lots of stairs and only one elevator. Not every part of the library can be reached if you can’t walk. (Gothamist)

Only 22 of Manhattan residents own cars. Is it time to ban cars? (Curbed)

The Red Hook Tavern’s burger is supposed to be New York’s best, but is it worth the two-hour wait? (Eater)

There’s an election this year and early voting starts October 26. (Gothamist)

12 historic Italian-American sites of the East Village. (6sqft)

If you’ve got $200 and a desperate need to get from downtown Manhattan to JFK in eight minutes, The 14th St Busway was in full effect on Thursday with the biggest complaints coming from Uber passengers that had to *gasp* WALK AN EXTRA BLOCK. The 18 months of the pilot program will be observed to potentially become permanent if successful. (Gothamist)

Who is this monster fishing in the Gowanus Canal? (Pardon Me For Asking)

What to do and where to eat in Carroll Gardens. (amNY)

A former aide to Robert De Niro accused the actor Thursday of sexually harassing her during her 11-year station of working for him. (Patch)

The Amazon HQ2 flop left a bad taste in Long Island City’s elected officials and was the center of conversation when discussing development in the area around the Anable Basin during a town hall this week. (LIC Post)

Six members of the “Mike’s Candyshop” alleged drug delivery service were arrested in connection with the fatal overdose of HQ Trivia co-founder Colin Kroll. (Gothamist)

72 of America’s richest billionaires live in NYC. (Patch)

After the NYPD friendly-fire killing of Officer Brian Mulkeen, all anti-crime units have been directed to undergo enhanced tactical training. (amNY)

A look at the history of Shiloh Presbyterian Church in Greenwich Village, which played a leading role in the abolitionist movement and a part of the underground railroad. (GVSHP)

+ POOL Light is an art installation in the East River, a fifty-foot glowing plus sign which is part art and part data visualization. The color changes based on the conditions of the water, giving a live water quality report. (Gothamist)

Under the Sanitation Department’s new proposed rules, any food establishment with more than one location will have to compost their food waste. (amNY)

The best restaurants over 59th St. (The Infatuation)

It’s October! Here’s everything you need to know about this year’s Greenwich Village Halloween Parade. (StreetEasy)

An idiot with a death wish climbed into the lion’s enclosure at the Bronx Zoo and had an up-close and personal experience with a male lion and managed to live to post about it on Instagram. The NYPD would like to have a few words with her. (Patch)

The flavored vape ban has been blocked by an appellate judge while the lawsuit works its way through the courts. (Patch)

The hottest restaurants in Brooklyn for October 2019. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 10, 2019 – The “A Horrifying Nightmare Trip on Columbus Ave” Edition

The tribute in lights is killing birds, $90k of stolen cake, a guide to apple picking, more details about the Charging Bull banjo attack, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

San Gennaro kicks off on Thursday, and amNY has a guide for what you need to know and what you need to eat. (amNY)

The May Room, an art installation from Shantell Martin, has taken over Our Lady Star of the Sea, the military chapel on Governors Island, through October 27. This is the first time the chapel is open to the public in twenty years. (Untapped Cities)

While the amusement area in Coney Island is larger than ever, its neighborhood storefronts are struggling with the third highest vacancy rate in Brooklyn and sixth in the city. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

There’s a jimsonweed bush growing on the Columbus Ave greenway at the corner of 93rd St. It’s an odd pick to be planted there, as jimsonweed is highly toxic when consumed. That’s not all. The plant can be made into a powerful drug that is easy to overdose on and if you survive you’re almost guaranteed a horrifying nightmare of a hallucinogenic trip that turns its victims into “zombies devoid of free will.” Avoid the plant. (Gothamist)

Is there nothing New York won’t add alcohol to? Taco Bell, ice cream, and now bubble tea. Bubbleology opens on the 16th in the East Village (Time Out)

A guide to picking apples near the city. (Patch)

This is such a bummer I’m surprised it didn’t come from Neil deGrasse Tyson. The Tribute in Lights, which takes place for a few days every year around the anniversary of 9/11, is killing thousands and thousands of birds. It seems that birds get confused by the light during their migration periods, essentially trapping them and preventing them from having the energy to finish their trip south. Since 2006, the tribute has ruined over a million birds’ flight patterns. (Splinter)

Think about cake. Now think about a lot of cake. Now think about $90,000 of cake. That’s how much cake a deliveryman stole from Lady M in Long Island City. (LIC Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer endorsed Elizabeth Warren for president. He joins City Councilmembers Brad Lander and Antonio Reynoso with his endorsement. Do you think it’ll get awkward when de Blasio finally fails out of the race and comes back to do his job in the city? (Patch)

Restoration on the World’s Fair Observation Towers in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park will begin next month. If you’ve ever been curious what’s at the top of the towers, there are some photos. (Untapped Cities)

We’re no Hawaii, but New York state is the 15th “happiest” state in the country. At least we’re not West Virginia, right? (Patch)

Good news for the asphalt area in Tompkins Square Park, which is known as the epicenter of NYC skateboard culture. The city had originally planned to turn over the area while East River Park gets rebuilt to prevent rising sea levels from destroying Manhattan, but the Parks Department has changed its plans after an outcry from the community and a rally promoted by City Councilmember Carlina Rivera. (Gothamist)

Is NYCHA ready for the next Superstorm Sandy? After the 2012 storm, nearly 80,000 residents were without electricity for weeks. Seven years later, Comptroller Scott Stringer is questioning the de Blasio administration’s preparedness. (Curbed)

More details are starting to emerge about this weekend’s banjo-wielding attack by Tevon Varlack from Dallas on the Charging Bull statue. Repairing the statue will cost around $100,000. (Gothamist)

FlyNYON is already under federal scrutiny for its fatal 2018 East River crash which left five people dead. Now it’s attracting even more negative attention for its recent promotion offering dogs a spot in its doors-off helicopter rides around lower Manhattan. (Patch)

Here are the street closures for the 9/11 ceremonies this year. (amNY)

Photos from the Coney Island Beard and Moustache Competition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’re yearning for the days of Mayor Bloomberg welcoming people into his administration with a handshake, an expectation of hard work, and a quiet “don’t fuck this up,” “The Many Lives of Michael Bloomberg” may be the book for you. (Politico)

The “where are people going out right now” guide. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for September 3, 2019 – The “Paying to Sleep in a Van in the East Village” Edition

Cuomo calls for a National Grid alternative, a giraffe corpse found in the water, the Boerum Hill chicken massacre mystery, fall foliage, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Brooklyn Detention Complex will close by the end of the year and its inmates will be transferred to Rikers Island. This is the jail that had a fire in the winter that robbed it of heat for days on end and struggled with the heat during the hottest days of summer. Mayor de Blasio’s community jail plan is set for a vote in city council this month. (The City)

Three illegal Airbnb landlords agreed to a $1 million settlement after making $21.4 million from illegal rentals. Seems like a good deal to me. (Patch)

$85 a night on Airbnb to sleep in a van in the East Village. (Airbnb)

Everyone’s talking about the end of summer, and even though it doesn’t end for three more weeks, here’s a map of when to see peak fall foliage in the city. (Patch)

Meet the Houdini Museum of New York’s 23-year-old director. (amNY)

The top 10 secrets of Madison Square Garden, although “they dress up the backstage area for artists” doesn’t seem like much of a secret. (Untapped Cities)

The restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including 3 restaurants ordered closed after 100+ point violations. (Patch)

The boiler room of the Chelsea Market is now an art space, with ARTECHOUSE taking over the space. The first show is Machine Hallucinations from digital artist Refik Anadol. (Untapped Cities)

The state finished the Kosciuszko Bridge early and the city’s Department of Transportation was caught with their pants down and the bike paths to the bridge weren’t ready. (Curbed)

Did you see the mystery Boerum Hill chicken massacre aftermath video? (Gothamist)

NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill has no plans to step down in light of the Police Benevolent Association’s vote of no confidence. (amNY)

If you’re thinking about a new look for the fall, you’re in luck because Cheetos and Forever21 are giving out free Flamin’ Haute Cheeto makeovers on Friday and Saturday. (Time Out)

NYC Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes will open next week. (amNY)

Just in time, they can investigate who vandalized the Silver Gull in Queens with anti-semitic, pro-Nazi, and racist graffiti. (NY Times)

National Grid has been refusing to serve new businesses as a tactic to get their gas pipeline approved by the state and the governor isn’t having it, making public statements that the Department of Public Service should consider alternative franchisees. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD’s leadership is very white. (The City)

This weekend was a particularly violent one when it came to shootings. The NYPD shot and killed a man in Jamaica, Queens who was the suspect in a bodega shooting. (Gothamist)

A shootout with the NYPD in Brownsville, Brooklyn has left a man dead. (amNY)

A shooting in Richmond Hill, Queens left one dead and two seriously injured. (QNS)

Smithsonian Museum Day is coming up on September 21, which means free admission to 30 of the city’s museums if you register in advance. (Time Out)

The Paris Theater, the city’s last single-screen movie theater, is closed. As John Waters comments in this Times piece Where will old art movie fans go to see rarified foreign films in the safety of a rich neighborhood?” (NY Times)

Cars were removed from Central Park last June but traffic signals and lines painted on the streets haven’t been changed, causing chaos and creating a wild atmosphere for pedestrians and cyclists alike. (Streetsblog)

Photos from the Electric Zoo on Randall’s Island. (Gothamist)

How the global diamond trade helped shape the city’s skyline. (The Real Deal)

An SUV driver hit and killed a man he suspected broke into his car on Monday, marking the 21st cyclist to be killed by a driver in the city this year. (Gothamist)

How did a giraffe corpse end up at the bottom of the Lower New York Bay? How about a piano in the Bronx River? These are the mysteries of Underwater New York. (Patch)

Photos from J’Ouvert 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want dinner to feel like going out. (The Infatuation)