The Briefly for January 9, 2019 – The “Great Pizza Recipe Caper of 2019” Edition

The mayor wants to give healthcare to all, Corey johnson wants control of the subways and buses, $26 million was saved in rent thanks to the L train shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Threats of the L train shutdown saved renters in Williamsburg over $26 million in rent. A different version of this story could say “The L train shutdown cost landlords over $26 in rent. (Metro)

“Back of a taxi” is becoming a popular birth spot, with the second baby of the year being delivered while the meter was running. (NY Post)

The second large scale project Staten Island has lost in the last few months when the developers of the Riverside Galleria withdrew their plans after facing pressure from politicians. (The Real Deal)

For now, it seems like you can get a taste of Nolita uptown. The man behind Prince Street Pizza is suing a former chef for allegedly stealing the recipe for his famous spicy pepperoni slice and bringing it to the former chef’s new restaurant Made in New York Pizza on the Upper West Side. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio announce that the city will spend $100 million to provide health care for undocumented immigrants and others who cannot qualify for insurance. His vision is that the city would provide comprehensive care to everyone, including 300,000 undocumented New Yorkers. (NY Times)

The debate over Amazon’s HQ2 has unions squaring off with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union’s opposition at odds over the project with the Service Employees International Union and the Building and Construction Trades Council’s support. (The Real Deal)

The best coffee shops for meetings. (The Infatuation)

Welcome to 2019: the home of New York’s worst measles outbreak in decades. (NY Post)

It’s seemed inevitable that Willits Point was headed towards mega-development, but that inevitability has loomed overhead decades. A stadium for the Mets, a mall, and now the Queensborough Football Club have laid claim to the neighborhood, despite decade-old plans for mixed-income housing. (Gothamist)

SNL’s Michael Che is putting together “A Night for NYCHA” this Friday at Irving Plaza to benefit the Fund for Public Housing, featuring Jeff Ross, Michelle Wolf and a “top secret” lineup of comedians. There is a GoFundMe page for people who can’t attend but still want to donate (amNY)

A lawsuit was dismissed that claimed that Danny Meyer sat atop a New York restaurateur illuminati-esque group which sought to pocket tips intended for their staffs. (Eater)

Whatever happened to the toxic dust the MTA claimed would make a partial L train shutdown impossible? (Gothamist)

A Bronx pedestrian was killed by a driver of a city sanitation truck who was preemptively salting Willis Avenue at E. 138th Street. The driver was suspended and is cooperating with the NYPD. (Streetsblog)

What you need to know about the city’s special election for public advocate. (Curbed)

A dog museum? A dog museum. The AKC Museum of the Dog is opening on February 8 at 101 Park Avenue, bringing paintings, prints, sculptures, porcelain figurines, displays and more to two floors, including the first exhibition “For the Love of All Things Dog.” (USA Today)

Mario Batali, famous for orange Crocs, an apology that pairs with pizza dough cinnamon rolls, and being accused of sexual misconduct, will not be facing criminal charges for two sexual assaults that allegedly took place in 2004 and 2005. (Eater)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will reveal a plan to wrestle control of the MTA’s subways and buses from the MTA within the next two months. Will he shutdown the shutdown of the shutdown? (Streetsblog)

A judge blocked Mayor de Blasio’s attempt to move carriage horses inside Central Park instead of being alongside cars on the streets. A full hearing will take place February 8. (NY Post)

Politicians can’t constitutionally block critics on official social media accounts. Looking at you State Senator Kevin “Kill Yourself” Parker and City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. (Metro)

38 essential restaurants, winter edition. (Eater)

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The Briefly for October 24, 2018 – The “Evict Madison Square Garden in 2023” Edition

Fact checking the Molinaro/Cuomo debate, the 2020 census problem, Amazon is opening a cashless store to Manhattan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Watch Tuesday’s debate between Governor Cuomo and Marc Molinaro. (CBS) Fact checking and five takeaways from the debate. (NY Times)

How to vote. (Special Projects)

Is it possible for New York to evict Madison Square Garden in 2023? (Gothamist)

Amazon is opening an Amazon Go store in Brookfield Place near the World Trade Center, which is Amazon’s “no cash, no checkout” stores. What could go wrong? (Tribeca Citizen)

Get ready for a wet, wet, wet Halloween. (NY Post)

The Proud Boy who threw the first punch and triggered the fight on the Upper East Side was 26-year-old Maxwell Hare. The NYPD is conducting a criminal inquiry into the SPLC designated hate group Proud Boys. (Gothamist)

11 additive buffalo wings in the city. (Eater)

As more storefronts become empty throughout the city, something will have to be done. The Small Business Jobs Saving Act was a potential solution, but despite the backing of city council, the mayor is dead set against it and he has the backing of the Real Estate Board of New York. (Gothamist)

There are still hints of the original Penn Station sprinkled throughout the nightmare that sits underground on 34th St. (Curbed)

A tour of the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s New York City. (Vanity Fair)

The 2020 census presents a problem for the city and Brooklyn’s 2.6 million people to be specific. Without proper reporting, the city won’t receive proportional funding or representation in Congress, but proper reporting could put undocumented residents in danger. This is where #MakeItCountBrooklyn comes in. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This isn’t how an ambulance is supposed to find people who need to go to the hospital. (NY Post)

The Staten Island Ferris Wheel is dead. (Curbed) If you’re looking for puns, go no further than Rachel Holliday Smith on Twitter.

Another Brooklyn College professor is in trouble for what he posted online. This time it’s Dr. Rohit Parikh, who posted an anti-Latinx screed on Facebook. Students are demanding sensitivity training and a boost in funding to latino student groups. (NY Post)

The city has granted unlimited sick leave to workers who contracted illnesses from working at Ground Zero after 9/11. (amNY)

How the 1919 “Black Sox” World Series was fixed on 73rd and Broadway. (6sqft)

If everyone who thought James Dolan was an asshole wasn’t allowed into Madison Square Garden, it would sit empty every single night. (Observer)

What happened to the fire extinguishers in subway cars? (@s_nessen)


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The Briefly for September 4, 2018 – The Weirdest Moment in the Gubernatorial Debate, Explained

Sarah Jessica Parker was invoked by Governor Cuomo, a baby Mandrill is born, the Times Square bees have a new home, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Photos from J’Ouvert in Crown Heights.

Save the date! The first public hearing on the rezoning of portions of Governors Island is September 26. Due to a 2003 deal with the federal government, no condos, co-ops, or casinos can be built on the island.

An explanation of the weirdest moment of the gubernatorial debate between Cynthia Nixon and Andrew Cuomo that involved Sarah Jessica Parker and a teahouse in the West Village.

Say hello to the Bronx Zoo’s newest baby Mandrill!

The debate between Lt. Governor Democratic Primary opponents Kathy Hochul and Jumaane Williams is available on MNN’s YouTube channel.

Jem R. Ibrahimov was arrested for allegedly drawing swastikas on a fire house and several ambulances.

The OY/YO sculpture that called Brooklyn Bridge Park and the Williamsburg waterfront home is headed to the Brooklyn Museum from September 19 to June 30 of next year.

“In the afternoon, walking on Fifth Avenue, we were on the edge of a beautiful wind storm, the air full of dust and a sort of panicky terror in all the living things in sight.”

The complete failure of the city’s green cab program provided the exact opportunity Uber needed to thrive.

Franklin Ave gets a permanent Aretha tribute. The MTA Arts & Design and LeRoy McCarthy of Heterodoxx INC (the first person to spray paint the tribute at the same station) worked together for the tribute.

The week ahead in politics, from the Gotham Gazette. The speed camera bill, fist day of school, the first listening session about marijuana legalization, and everything ahead.

The Times Square hot dog bees have a new (and undisclosed) home, according to @NYPDBees.

Scenes from the West Indian Day Parade.

Chuck Schumer endorsed Andrew Cuomo for the upcoming Gubernatorial Democratic primary against Cynthia Nixon.

The Billion Oyster Project is looking to restore, yes, one billion oysters in New York City’s waters by 2035. Oysters can help clean the water, encourage greater biodiversity, and protect against storm damage.

Jasmine Robinson vs. incumbent Diane Savino answer questions from Streetsblog ahead of their 23rd Senate district Democratic primary.

Stop attacking the slot machines at Resorts World Casino in Queens.


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