The Briefly for May 15, 2020 – The “Quarantining with a Ghost” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Understanding the state’s reopening plans, what rooftop bars may look like on reopening, make a real NYC bagel, the best hospitals, and more

Today – Low: 62˚ High: 79˚
Drizzle in the morning and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 54˚ High: 75˚

A beginner’s guide to understanding New York’s reopening plan. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The City Council’s bill capping fees restaurant delivery apps can charge tops out at 20% and it’s waiting for Mayor de Blasio’s signature. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Let the true 2021 mayoral race begin, as Scott Stringer makes an off-handed remark about Corey Johnson’s predilection for dancing in public. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Happy 100th birthday to Louise Ceci Jacobson, who celebrated with a drive-by parade. (Carlotta Mohamed for amNewYork Metro)

45% of U.S. adults believe in ghosts, but how many of us believe we are quarantining with a specter ? (Molly Fitzpatrick for NY Times)

asian-veggies.com a new Asian produce delivery service in Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan. (Cathy Erway for Grub Street)

Over 100 city kids have PMIS, the pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome, which may be linked to Covid-19. Seventeen total states and six European countries have reported cases and there have been three deaths from PMIS in New York state so far. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

President Trump’s playbook seems to be ‘Ford To City: Drop Dead’ (Paul Blumenthal for HuffPost)

Video: There’s the National Debt Clock, there’s the actual clock in Union Square, and now add the Trump Death Clock in Times Square to the city’s list of infamous clocks. (HuffPost)

Paulo Pinho and Clelia Pinho, the couple charged with a hate crime for allegedly attacking a group of Hasidic men, argue that they are the real victims because the men the allegedly attacked were not social distancing. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Let’s take a moment to celebrate anything that brings us an inch closer to the way life was before mid-March. Dunkins across the city have begun reopening. (Give Me Astoria)

What will dining look like once we’re back? A look to California may provide some answers. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

An unnamed “famous Upper East Side bar and lounge” and a “trendy downtown hotel” have both supposedly held speakeasy parties this week. A risky move, considering the Post already found out, so city officials can’t be too far behind. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Video: Another disturbing NYPD arrest, this time it’s a 22-year-old mother being violently arrested while walking with her toddler. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

You’d be surprised how NYC hasn’t changed int he last century from this aerial photograph from 1933. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Broken machines, staff shortages, a lack of bilingual interpreters, and polling locations that weren’t accessible to the disabled. A report released Thursday by City Comptroller Scott Stringer found “widespread mismanagement and lax recordkeeping” by the city Board of Elections in last year’s general election. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

NYU Langone Medical Center and NYC Health + Hospitals – Metropolitan came out on top of Leapfrog’s list of the best and worst hospitals in NYC. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Twenty community clinics will now make free coronavirus testing available to all people showing symptoms, with an additional 12 clinics scheduled to be added to that list. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Followup to the story about Dr Oxiris Barbot, the city’s health commissioner, and a comment she made to Terence Monahan, the NYPD Chief of Department, Dr Barbot has already apologized. Ed Mullins, the head of the NYPD’s union who is the subject of an NYPD Internal Affairs probe, continues to push on Twitter, having called Dr Barbot a “bitch.” It’s time to move on Ed. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Will rooftop bars still be a thing this summer? Here’s a what they could look like. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

This is NYC’s biggest asshole, who thought dumping a Rubbermaid container of cereal and milk on the subway would be funny. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

Shopsin’s is back at Essex Market. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The schedules for virtual Brooklyn and Queens Pride Month events have been released. (Matt Tracy for amNewYork Metro)

Community health centers in the city will receive $22 million in emergency funds from the federal government to bolster coronavirus testing capacity. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Ahead of expected budget cuts, CUNY is looking to cut its budget by $10 billion, with adjunct professors first on the chopping block. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The meat shortage,” as explained by the city’s meat suppliers. (Kitty Greenwald for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio appointed at least 80 donors to advisory groups that were formed to help shape New York City’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. There are a total of 330 people appointed to the groups. (Anna Sanders for NY Daily News)

As the city creeps towards a reopening, beauty salon owners don’t feel like they have a seat at the table. Maybe they should have donated more to the mayor? (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Frozen on Broadway is closed. The show will not reopen once Broadway returns. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The head of the city’s contract tracing program is the same person who gave Mayor de Blasio advice in March that there was “no proof that closures will help stop the spread,” and believed that large events should have continued as planned. This was happening while the mayor’s top health officials were threatening resignation in protest if the mayor didn’t listen to them. (William K. Rashbaum, J. David Goodman, Jeffery C. Mays and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

10 ways for adding more plants in your NYC apartment. (Localize.City)

This weekend’s project? Make real New York-style bagels at home. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Flo for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 14, 2020 – The “Your Reservation for The L Train is in 45 Minutes” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 12 miles of new open streets, the NYPD take aim at Dr Oxiris Barbot, the possible end of the Staten Island Yankees, a brunch delivery guide, and more

Today – Low: 58˚ High: 62˚
Possible light rain overnight.

I haven’t been tested this whole time.” -Mayor de Blasio (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city is adding 12 additional miles of open streets today/Thursday. Some protected bike lanes that have been long-planned were also announced for opening throughout the month. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The MTA is looking into “everything” when it comes to crowd control and reducing packed subway cars once the city starts reopening, including reserving space on subways and buses. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The chaos at Elmhurst hospital exposes the city’s lack of a cohesive healthcare system and shows that all we have are a series of hospitals that are ill-equipped to work as a team. (Jim Dwyer for NY Times)

The police union is calling for the head of Dr. Oxiris Barbot after she denied an NYPD request for 500,000 surgical masks during the height of the pandemic. Her response was that she “didn’t give two rats’ asses about your cops.” Okay, maybe that’s not the best response, but the NYPD’s total headcount is 55,000, why do they need 500,000 masks during a PPE shortage? (NY1)

It must be fun to be NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea because he seems to exist in a reality that the rest of us don’t inhabit. According to Shea, the problem with the NYPD’s selective and racially biased enforcement isn’t the NYPD, the problem is the people the NYPD are enforcing the rules on. No one doubts that being an NYPD officer is one of the toughest possible jobs in the city, but to argue that when a cop with a violent history beats the shit out of an NYCHA groundskeeper with no criminal history, it’s the groundskeeper’s fault? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It was only a few months ago that I linked to a story about Brian Quinn, aka Q from “Impractical Jokers” on TruTV reviving the Rubsam and Horrmann name for brewing company in Staten Island. Covid-19, like with most things, pumped the brakes on his places. Now their unused beer is being used to create hand santizer, working with Kings County Distillery in Brooklyn. (Roger Clark for NY1)

State Senator Julia Salazar earned Bernie Sanders’s endorsement in her re-election campaign, along with financial support from his followers. State Senator Mike Gianaris also earned Sanders’s support for his beating back of Amazon in Queens. (Andrew Karpan for Bushwick Daily)

82 kids are being treated for pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome. Fourteen states and five European countries are investigating the syndrome. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The move by Major League Baseball to downsize minor league teams is still moving forward, and the Staten Island Yankees are still on the chopping block. Game attendance was at its lowest last season and its games are the third-lowest attended games in the league. This could be the last season for the team if the season ever gets started. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

There’s a commissioned new mural at Atlantic Terminal by Brooklyn artist Jason Naylor which adds a splash of bright color, titled “Hope,” to the city. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

Governor Cuomo added a sign language interpreter to his daily press conferences after being sued by Disability Rights New York for not including one. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

Crews at Green-Wood Cemetery have been working seven days a week with shifts that can be longer than 17 hours to keep up with the demand for cremation and burials. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

In a sign of good news, healthcare workers now have a lower rate of infection than the general population, which points at being careful and taking precautions actually working. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Are we ready for in-person shopping to look very different? (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

David Chang is closing Momofuku Nishi for good. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The City Council passed a package of legislation to help small businesses on Wednesday that aims to protect commercial tenants from harassment by their landlords and restrict the fees that third-party apps such as Grubhub and Uber Eats can charge businesses during states of emergency. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

The New York Times has discovered something new during the pandemic: the outside. (Alexis Soloski for NY Times)

The city is supposed to be stepping up to help New York’s homeless when the subways close at 1 am. NY1 followed the trains to the end of the tracks to find a city that was not equipped to help the people that need it the most. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

Plan your weekend, here’s a brunch delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Karen for today’s featured photo of a new way to get car-free streets in the city.

The Briefly for April 7, 2020 – The “No, We Are Not Burying Dead Bodies in City Parks” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor ends his open streets program, a guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery, the hardest temp job in the city, weird things people are doing, & more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 64˚
Light rain overnight.

Punk Island, one of the city’s best DIY and free music festivals, is postponed from its usual June date. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Video: A beautifully shot montage of a barren city, titled “The New Normal Quarantine.” (Matt Chirico)

No matter what you read, the city does not have plans to bury the dead in public parks. The rumor originated by Mark D. Levine, the Chair of New York City Council health committee, who spent the entire day on Twitter walking back the mess that he created. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s official body count from COVID-19 of 2,738 is likely a vast undercount. On a “normal” day, about 20-25 New Yorkers die in their homes, but in our new reality, about 200 people are dying at home on a daily basis. Those bodies are not tested for COVID-19, so they are not listed as a confirmed case. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

City schools will continue remote learning on Passover and Good Friday this year, completely removing spring break from the calendar. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The June Regents exams are canceled. The state is trying to figure out graduation requirements since the Regents is a requirement. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

If the June Regents are canceled, does the June SAT and ACT date stand a chance? (Benjamin Mandile for QNS)

A look inside the slow collapse of the city’s catering industry. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

If you’re having trouble understanding what being six feet apart looks like, the city is installing signs showing you how far to stay away from your fellow New Yorker. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I don’t think that when Acting Queens Borough President Sharon Lee accepted a temporary job that she’d be imagining she’d be overseeing the worst-hit county in the country with an election date that was already postponed once. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

If you’re looking for the slightest bit of good news, it seems like the growth of the novel coronavirus outbreak in New York City might be slowing down. (Ann Choi and Yoav Gonen for The City)

Three cheers to the landlords across the city choosing to not demand rent this month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The first jail inmate to test positive for COVID-19 at Rikers Island, Michael Tyson (not the one you’re thinking of), died on Sunday while awaiting a hearing on a parole violation. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

The New York Public Library and WYNC are teaming together to launch a virtual book club, the club is virtual, the book is real. The first book is James McBride’s Deacon King Kong. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Yes, a tiger in the Bronx Zoo has COVID-19. Your pet is probably okay. Just treat them as an extension of yourself. Keep distance from other people and dogs. (James Gorman for NY Times)

Tuesday night will be a pink supermoon, climbing to its highest point at 10:35 pm. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What’s harder than finding a good one-bedroom in a great neighborhood that doesn’t break the bank? Trying to order groceries for delivery. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Your best bets for grocery delivery in the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New York is on PAUSE through April 29, a two-week extension. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Video: It’s a touch of history from the end of World War I in Woodhaven. The Memorial Trees were planted after the first world war and were mostly forgotten to time until a few years ago. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

It seems that we’re not good at staying home, according to our location data. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Maybe that’s why 311 received over 4,000 complaints about a lack of social distancing in its first week of receiving complaints. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York Cliché, a favorite of The Briefly, is looking for pitches and is paying for posts. She wrote a great piece about getting tickets to late-night talk shows, but then the world went to hell so I never posted it. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

Reimagined NYC road signs for our new lives by artist Dylan Coonrad. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A list of NYC restaurants raising funds to feed healthcare workers. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art released a new lineup of free digital programming. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Satire: NYPD Razes Central Park Hospital Tents For Violating Outdoor Encampment Laws. (The Onion)

Performance activist Billy Talen was arrested after planting a rainbow flag on Sunday in protesting Samaritan’s Purse, the anti-gay religious group behind Central Park’s field hospital. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor is ending his “open streets” program after it wasn’t popular enough to justify the heavy NYPD presence at each closed street. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A running list of Mayor de Blasio’s coronavirus response missteps. (Elizabeth Kim, Jen Carlson, and Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 major proposals not included in the state’s new budget. #1? Marijuana legalization. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve done in quarantine? (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The pandemic guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Lisa Rosenblum for submitting today’s featured photo!