The Briefly for November 15, 2018 – The “These Preparations Are Snow Joke” Edition

The best slices of pizza, the MTA’s new vacuum train, a lawsuit to stop de Blasio’s school admissions changes, NY’s library rivalry continues, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Amazon deal was a “hard bargain,” according to Mayor de Blasio. Anyone want to play poker against the mayor? (Politico)

The city is going overboard and is not kidding around with these snow preparations. (Gothamist)

10 of the best slices of pizza in NYC, according to Pete Wells. (NY Times)

The MTA has a new 600 horse power “vacuum train” to clear the tracks. Look for the VAKTRAK when you’re desperate for a train to come. (Gothamist)

If the city had an additional 1,000 ballot scanning machines that were not in use during the election, what the hell were they doing with them? (Gothamist)

“I want it to be real New York. I want it to be the local bridges, the local subways, the streets.” Here’s why Stan Lee’s superheroes lived in New York and not a fictional city. (NY Times)

Is WeWork, the city’s largest tenant, too big to fail? (The Real Deal)

The birth of mass transit in the city started with a horse-drowned “omnibus.” (GVSHP)

The MTA’s “Fair Fares” program, which provides discounted MetroCards to New Yorkers living below the federal poverty line, is finally launching. What’s the hook? There will be no single ride discounts. (Gothamist)

The amazing story of a cross-country book sorting rivalry between New York and Seattle. (Atlas Obscura)

The federal government’s plan to take over the NYCHA has been rejected due to a lack of sufficient funds ($2 billion didn’t cut it) and poor planning. (NY Post)

What does the NYC public advocate do? (amNY)

The NYPD arrested a man accused of fishing 346 checks out of mailboxes. Travis Everett is accused of fishing about $400,000 worth of checks from Queens boxes. (NY Post)

New Yorkers have always preferred the “worse” subway map compared to the “perfect” one. (Cheddar)

The Brooklyn Army Terminal stop on the NYC Ferry is temporarily closed while a new barge is built. It’s elected to re-open in three to four weeks. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Parent groups are getting a federal lawsuit ready to stop Mayor de Blasio’s plans to change specialized high school admissions. (NY Post)

An art historian is offering paid tours of street art. Yes, it’s in Bushwick, how did you know? (Brooklyn Paper)

Realistically speaking, what can be done to stop the Amazon deal? Spoiler warning: Not much. (NY Times)

Never underestimate the allure of Nutella. The Nutella Cafe had over 100 people waiting in line for the grand opening. (Eater)

Meet App-App. It’s like Netflix, but for appetizers. Seriously. (Viewing NYC)

Eight neighborhoods that will feel the hurt when Amazon comes to town. (StreetEasy)

Get a load of this! The largest chocolate waterfall in North America (45-foot-long, 10-foot-high) is now in Union Square. (Eater)

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The Briefly for November 12, 2018 – The “Your Shawarma Cart Has A C Rating” Edition

Out compost is trash, Williamsburg is booming, student walk out over a Facebook education, the Rockefeller Tree is here, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

What week is complete without being unable to get around at night? No overnight L or 3 trains, changes to the Q, E, 1, 2, and D lines. (Subway Changes)

Get ready for your favorite street meat cart to have a health department grade. (NY Post)

Live-shooter trainings inside synagogues. Armed guards inside churches. This is what NYC’s religious services look like in 2018. (NY Post)

The 72-foot-tall Rockefeller Center Christmas tree has taken her place at 30 Rock. You can visit Shelby before she gets lit up on November 28th at 7pm. (NY Post)

The RFK Human Rights Foundation’s mass bail out is shining light on the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice and Department of Corrections. Should a man who was caught on video assaulting a guard have been allowed bail one week after the incident? (NY Post)

Does New York’s blue wave mean that the golden era of charter schools is over? (NY Times)

High school students organized a walkout in protest of a Facebook-backed curriculum. After a week of self-teaching, each student gets somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes of “mentoring.” (NY Post)

How is it possible that Ice-T has never eaten a bagel in his life? (Gothamist)

Having completely fixed the subways and buses, the MTA Chairman Joe Lhota has resigned. (Streetsblog)

The city’s best ice skating rinks. (Curbed)

People struggling to cross the street during the NYC Marathon is exactly what you need on Monday morning. (Gothamist)

Michael J. Ryan, the man in charge of last week’s election, on what went right and what went wrong. (Gothamist)

If Seoul and San Francisco can get it right, why can’t the city’s composting program get off the ground? (NY Times)

Even the L train can’t stop Williamsburg’s development boom. Take a look at the map. (Curbed)

Dr Kurt Salzinger, an 89-year-old scholar who escaped the Nazis in Austria, died after being shoved onto the 3 train’s subway tracks in Penn Station. (NY Times)

The city’s 40 best brunches. (Eater)

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The Briefly for November 8, 2018 – The “No One Wants to Be On El Chapo’s Jury” Edition

Albany’s new faces, an investigation into Eric Garner’s death starts today, the elections aren’t over yet, a jury has been chosen for El Chapo’s trial, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Meet the five new faces headed to Albany to represent the city in the State Senate. (amNY)

The jury has been selected for the El Chapo trial, despite an “open rebellion” against the idea of being on the jury. (amNY)

Low-level marijuana enforcement is down 58% and arrests are down by 90% in one year’s time, thanks to Mayor de Blasio’s policy change in the spring. While the overall numbers decreased, it did not change the racial disparities of who is being policed. (Politico)

This is a different type of defense. A Columbia University student is claiming that he couldn’t have raped another student because he was “too drunk.” He claims to have drank enough to black out and claim he has a blood ties to Nazis. He sounds like a real winner. (NY Post)

10 memorable art installations at the Brooklyn Bridge, past and present. (Untapped Cities)

Of 142 garbage trucks from private companies inspected during the city’s one week crackdown, only ten were allowed to stay on the streets. During the week the city issued 1,070 summons. (NY Post)

You thought we were done with elections? With Letitia James becoming Attorney General on January 1, the city will schedule an election for Public Advocate. Anyone who can get enough signatures will be on the ballot. (amNY)

Not to be outdone by Shakespeare in the Park, Central Park’s SummerStage will also be getting an upgrade and will be ready for the 2019 season. (6sqft)

Is the Museum of Pizza “fine art”? (NY Post)

It’s time to go to The New York Botanical Garden, we’re almost at peak foliage. (amNY)

A guide to our current elected officials. (Curbed)

WFAN’s Craig Carton from “Boomer and Carton” is guilty of securities fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy to commit fraud. He could be going to prison for 45 years. (NY Post)

Rudy Giuliani divorce is shining a light on his peculiar spending habits. (Gothamist)

The NYPD blames the “current atmosphere” for the rise in hate crimes across the city. Don’t forget the NYPD blamed the increase in reported rapes on the #MeToo movement earlier this year. (Gothamist, amNY)

Eric Garner died on July 17, 2014. Four years later, the Civilian Complaint Review Board is beginning an investigation. (NY Times)

7 of the city top chefs share their favorite bodega food. (NY Post)

The average salary in NYC is $68,992. (TitleMax)

The Board of Elections can’t promise that the 2020 election will be better than 2018’s. In 2016, the BOE rejected a city offer of $20 million to find and fix systemic problems. (NY Post)

Not to be outdone by Amazon, Google is planning on hiring thousands of new employees and adding 1.3 million square feet of office space on the West side of Manhattan. (NY Times)

A restaurant where you dine alone and don’t speak to, or see, your waiter. (NBC New York)

All the free museum days across the city. (Time Out)


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