The Briefly for September 7, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, Hurricane Florence is On the Way, and More

The usual chaos of trying to get anywhere on the subway over the weekend, there is a chance that Hurricane Florence will hit New York on Primary Day, and more in today’s daily New York City new digest.

This weekend’s subway changes from 6sqft, including no G train between Bedford-Nostrand and Court Square and there’s no D train between Herald Square and Atlantic Ave. In addition, the Manhattan bound 1 train at 238th is closed through winter 2019.

Don’t look now, but there’s a chance we’re getting hit by Hurricane Florence on Primary day.

If you left a few inert grenades behind in a Staten Island storage facility, check to see if the bomb squad has a lost and found.

As expected, Governor Cuomo unveiled a revamped LIRR concourse and entrance to Penn Station with bigger hallways and higher ceilings. The project is still about two years from completion. The LIRR is currently running with the worst delays in nearly 20 years.

Senate candidate Julia Salazar was accused of having an affair with Mets legend Keith Hernandez. Wait, what?

During the last debate between the four Democratic primary hopefuls for Attorney General, Zephyr Teachout was the obvious target.

A 26-year-old woman was shot in the face outside an illegal club in Brooklyn late on Wednesday/early on Thursday. She survived the shooting and no arrests have been made.

Refinery 29 is thirsty for your Instagrams with Room29.

An expansion to Hudson Yards Park expansion will cost a staggering /$374 million for 3 acres.

The financial District will be the home of the first Alamo Drafthouse in Manhattan. It’s expected to open late 2019.

Current Attorney General Barbara Underwood subpoenaed every catholic diocese in New York as part of a broad sex abuse investigation in light of the Pennsylvania grand jury report.

Sex offenders will be able to vote at schools in the upcoming election, but only after 7pm. Correctional Services created a special condition that will allow offenders on school property, where they are otherwise banned.

Special edition Paul McCartney Metrocards are available at Grand Central. They’re already selling on eBay for $15-$40.

Brooklyn Democrat Carlos Menchacca introduced a bill that would prevent the city from being a part of any contract with any entity involved in immigration enforcement. The de Blasio administration has already stated it supports the goal, but won’t support the bill.

Don’t sit on train tracks. Bad things will happen.


Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for September 6, 2018 – A New Entrance to Penn Station, Ice Cream Noise Complaints, and More

Is Governor Cuomo’s endorsement toxic? Ice cream trucks generate over 1,000 noise complaints/year, Staten Island’s ferris wheel’s future is in question, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

A ballot initiative in November will give voters the option to lower the maximum donation in city elections from $5,100 to $2,000.

There were 1,279 ice cream truck noise complaints in the last year.

Does New York City needs the BQX? Curbed asks if the $2.7 billion streetcar project is worth the price after the recent revision to the plan.

The governor is rumored to announce a new entrance to Penn Station on Thursday morning. 650,000 use Penn Station on a daily basis and that number is expected to double in the next 15 years.

A flight from Dubai to JFK touched down with multiple people sick with flu-like symptoms. One of the people trapped on the “flu plane” was Vanilla Ice.

The World Trade Center/Cortland St subway stop opens this Saturday.

The culture is double parking!” Inwood’s bike lane drama is getting complicated.

“Equal Pay for Equal Work” has an origin story in NYC classrooms.

Landlords in the city owe more than $1.5 billion in fines. Kushner Companies owes the city over $500,000 alone.

The New York Wheel, Staten Island’s giant ferris wheel, may never be built. The contractor walked off the job in May and the whole project has become a series of lawsuits. The original plan had the wheel opening in October 2016 and costing $250 million. The current estimate is $600 million and it’s unknown if it will ever be built.

The Supreme Court decision that allowed government workers to not pay union dues is costing the city’s unions over $100,000 a week.

Will Governor Cuomo’s endorsement hurt Leticia James’s bid for Attorney General?

This year’s cronut is Duck’s Eatery’s smoked watermelon “ham.” Each costs $75 and they’re sold out through November.

The largest state park in New York City will open next summer in Brooklyn and will be named after Shirley Chisholm, the first black woman elected to Congress.

LIRR delays are the worst they’ve been in over 18 years. The MTA is fine.

Passenger service ended sixty five years ago on Staten Island’s North Shore Branch and there are still ghosts of the rail line marking the island.


Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for Labor Day 2018 – The City Has A New Pot Policy

The NYPD will issue summons instead of arrests in most cases involving smoking pot in public, but critics point out the new policy may continue to allow for racial profiling in arrests made.

There’s a new pot policy in the city, which started September 1. Anyone caught smoking marijuana in public will receive a summons instead of being arrested. There are exceptions to this rule, the most notable being that police can “exercise discretion” on how best to proceed.

The Village Voice has ceased publishing new stories, as reported by the re-animated corpse of Gothamist. The owner, Peter D. Barbey, is going to continue to make the paper’s archives available online. Gothamist suffered a similar fate, but was brought back to life by WNYC.

Less than a month after Inwood’s rezoning, the first 30-story rental tower is planned. The purpose of the rezoning was to encourage 5,000 new apartments in the neighborhood.

The city, working with Legal Aid, is working to get the 6,000 eligible people in Rikers Island registered to vote. The deadline to vote in the general elections on November 6 i October 12.

Another chapter in the long and complicated story of 85 Bowery has come to an end. On Thursday, tenants returned to their renovated homes almost two years after they were vacated from the building due to deteriorating conditions. In 2016, the owner filed a lawsuit to evict (rather than vacate) all tenants of the building, which spurred a legal argument about rent stabilized apartments. The story of the struggle between the tenants and the landlord isn’t over, but tenants once again have their homes.

Despite big promises about Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero, the NYPD has investigated less fatal collisions between pedestrians and cars. Investigations are down 19% and there are two fewer officers in the unit since 2013 (a promise was made to add more).

1,160 kids in NYCHA housing tested positive for lead poisoning since 2012. That number started as 19, then was revised to 820 and has ballooned to over 1,000. On the radio on Friday Mayor de Blasio made attempts to deflect the blame, insisting that the city hadn’t violated the CDC’s instructions, rather they hadn’t adhered to its guidance.

The Leave Behind Naloxone Program will leave a drug overdose kit with overdose survivors. Friends and family of survivors can also request a kit. Naloxone is used to block the effects of opioids in an overdose.

It’s been ten years since Coney Island’s Astroland closed. The Coney Island History Project is celebrating the lost amusement park throughout this month.

What is going on with The Michelle Obama Political Club that is in no way affiliated with Michelle Obama and why did this oddly named and seemingly newly formed group endorse State Senator Jesse Hamilton against Zellnor Myrie?

After declaring he would stop balancing the Sisyphus Stones, Uliks Gryka has stated he will return to Fort Washington Park to balance the stones after the stones were vandalized.

Melissa and Michelle Jones have become the NYPD’s first ever black twin-sister detectives.

Here it is, the dumbest opinion about bike lanes in history.

Juliio C. Ayala, an 18-year-old believed to be affiliated with MS-13, was arraigned on Sunday that he raped an 11-year-old girl in Brooklyn.

At 8.4%, Queens had the highest year-over-year rent hike in the country in August.

Another account of the Central Park West ghost bus, which the MTA says does not exist… but it does.

The man who sprayed a mystery substance on NYC buses was 46-year-old Andre Chandler and the mystery substance was bear repellant (twice as strong as pepper-spray). He faces 20 counts of assault and as far as we know there were no bears aboard those buses.

Please stop feeding the squirrels in Madison Square Park!


Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.