The Briefly for September 27, 2018 – 4,800 CitiBikes are Missing, Kids Don’t Read English too Good, and More

CitiBikes are on short supply, the city’s supply of low-rent apartments is declining, the MTA refutes claims of bed bug infestations, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

There are 12,000 CitiBikes in the city, but only 7,166 are on the road the shortages are becoming noticeable.

The MTA calls the bed bug reports are false and “irresponsible.” MTA employees say otherwise.

Stop, close your eyes and ask yourself “What area has the highest population of millennials?” What’s your answer? Don’t over think it, because Williamsburg and East Williamsburg have the highest population of millennials in the country.

The city’s 16 top tapas bars, according to Eater.

Nick Cavy the guinea pig, was rescued in Prospect Park and needs a good home, preferably far away from red-tailed hawks.

The NYCLU launched Equality Watch, an online tool for victims and witnesses of discrimination.

The mayor set out to create or preserve 300,000 units of affordable housing by 2026, but the number of low-rent apartments is declining.

A preview of the new Brooklyn skyline in Prospect Heights as the Pacific Park complex near the Barclays Center enters its next phase.

What’s it gonna cost to live like Dana Barrett in Ghostbusters? Property Shark analyzed the premium you’ll pay to live within one block of Central Park.

The man who attacked two gay men outside a bar in Bushwick is allegedly 25-year-old bigot and homophobe Brandon McNamara from Middle Village, Queens.

Uber will spend $10 million to help develop more efficient transportation policies, reduce congestion, and vehicle emissions, which is a problem partially created by Uber.

Oscar Guevera isn’t a dentist, but that didn’t stop him from putting braces on a 16-year-old girl at his wife’s dental office. He and his wife are being charged with multiple crimes.

City Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, chairman of the Committee on Transportation, announced the second annual 24-hour Riders Respond Transit Tour. Rodriguez and other city officials will ride the subway from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Oct. 3 and 4. Totally lame to split it into two days, right?

Williamsburg cafe Sands’ is closed temporarily after owner Guy Sands was tied to racist, white supremacist groups like The Proud Boys in a 2016 Vanity Fair article. Sands denies the claims.

The 80 Flatbush mega development continues to march forward, getting City Council approval. The next step is mayoral approval and construction may begin.

With fall’s arrival it’s time to tell yourself that you’ll get a flu shot next week, or the week after that, or the week after that… There were 45,368 confirmed cases of the flu in NYC last year.

The “Dear Future New York City” challenge is offering a $30,000 to connect youth with local businesses to find jobs. The challenge is open to 18-24 year-olds and is sponsored by Liberty Coca-Cola.

Express bus route changes with the intention of shortening commute times in Staten Island has resulted in longer wait times and crowded buses.

Drones strapped with explosives is the latest worry for the NYPD during the United Nations General Assembly.

Mayor de Blasio met with Cuban President Miguel Díaz-Canel, seeking to increase relations between the city and Cuba, despite the Trump administration’s decisions.

The results are in. After a recent standardized state exam, 46.7 percent of kids in grades 3 to 8 in public schools were proficient in English and just 42.7 percent were proficient in math. The same results in charter schools were 57.3% and 59.6%. The mayor remains opposed to expanding charter schools saying “I think the answer is to improve the schools we have.”

City Councilman Rory Lancman announced his candidacy for Queens District Attorney in 2019. The mothers of Sean Bell and Cory Garner have both endorsed Lancman. He also targeted over-policing of marijuana and other crimes referred to as victimless offenses.

Electric scooters are gaining support from the City Council, who believes they have the authority to make the legal in New York City, but the de Blasio administration wants to punt on the idea altogether, saying it’s a matter of state law.

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The Briefly for September 25, 2018 – 60,000 Delayed Trains Last Month, MTA Says Its Service is Getting Better

The MTA is “turning a corner” on providing better service, according to the MTA, four John Jay professors accused of misconduct and drug dealing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

All 216 of the city’s public libraries will have voter registration drives today, which happens to be National Voter Registrations Day. Today is the perfect day to register to vote if you haven’t already.

Every day is a gridlock alert day this week due to the U.N. General Assembly. Avoid midtown more than you already do.

More than 60,000 trains were delayed last month. The ceiling collapsed at Atlantic Avenue last week. The MTA says that service is getting better. Can’t get much worse.

Police are looking for this homophobe who allegedly assaulted two men leaving a gay bar in Williamsburg.

The Palace Theater in Times Square is getting a renovation…and 46 floors of retail, entertainment and hotel.

JFK is getting a $10 billion makeover that won’t be complete until 2035, but that doesn’t include new runways, and as a result, does not increase the airport’s capacity.

A group of four John Jay professors are under investigation for sexual misconduct and drug dealing that goes back to 2014. Anthropology chair Anthony Marcus is accused of rape, anthropology professor Rip Curtis is accused of dealing drugs and sexual harassment, professor Barry Spunt and adjunct professor Leonardo Dominguez are accused of harassment. They are all currently under administrative leave.

The Nightlife Mayor Ariel Palitz is holding town halls in all five boroughs. Much like the job of the night mayor itself, the purpose of the town halls are…yet unknown.

Rates of gonorrhea and chlamydia are up in the city from last year but syphilis is down. Be safe.

The 7 train schedule will get beefed up during the L train shutdown with 14 additional weekday trips in April of 2019. The 6 train will also see two new trips a day. Are we getting legal electric scooters as a result of the shutdown too?

Southern Brooklyn residents can call 311 starting October 1 to coordinate curbside electronic waste recycling pickup.

The Housing Rights Initiative revealed that many landlords across the city allegedly lied about rent-regulated apartments in their buildings, and still got approvals from the city’s Department of Buildings. City Councilmember Richie Torres introduced legislation that calls for building inspections and calls for the DOB to find false statements by landlords. Te HRI report is based on 10,000 permits, which represent three percent of the permits issues over the last two years.

NYC subway station bathrooms in Manhattan, reviewed by Thrillist.

Brooklyn City Councilman Justin Brannan announced plans to introduce a bill that would require pet stores to only sell animals from shelters and rescue centers. New York state has a similar bill, but it has gone nowhere (which should not be a surprise) and the councilman is tired of waiting.

The E doesn’t stop at the 2nd Ave F station, unless Google knows something that we don’t?


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The Briefly for August 31, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, J’Ouvert, Electric Scooters, and More

The weekend’s subway changes (the L train is running), the Brooklyn-Queens streetcar project is a long way from starting, “Jewtropolis” in maps, moving Central Park’s horse carriages away from cars, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Everything you need to know about subway changes this weekend and Monday.

The official information on J’Ouvert on Monday. Get a preview of someone of the elaborate preparations.

Gothamist looked at all the New York State Senate campaign websites so you don’t have to.

Meet the rebellious women of NYC in the 1800s.

For a few hours in Uber, the Weather Channel, Snapchat, and others, New York City’s name was changed to Jewtropolis. Whoops.

Dockless electric scooters from Bird have made their debut in the city with the first program taking place in Bed Stuy.

The Mayor’s lack of response to the hit and run that a killed four-year-old in Bushwick compared to everything that he has publicly done in response to the crash the killed a one and four-year-old in Park Slope tells the tale of two Brooklyns.

Some questions for the Governor after his debate against Cynthia Nixon.

The Department of Transportation proposed moving horse carriage pickups in Central Park to five spots within the park to decrease the amount of time they spend alongside cars.

The history of Brooklyn’s Caribbean carnival.

An evening in Washington Heights is documented with a photo essay by The Village Voice.

The plan for the BQX streetcar has been revised. The new plan would connect Astoria on one end to Red Hook and Gowanus on the other end has gotten smaller in scope (stops in Sunset Park were completely removed), will be more expensive ($1.3 billion more) and take longer (won’t be completed until 2029) than the original proposal in 2016.

Today’s NYC Ferry won’t make the trip, but one September day in 1910 and again in August 1911, Rose Pitonof swam the 17 miles from E 23rd St down to Steeplechase Pier in Coney Island.


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