The Briefly for May 15, 2019 – The “Carlos Danger Is At Large” Edition

A Queens city councilmember admits to sexual harassment and keeps his job, answering Broadway’s mysteries, Pride by the numbers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Welcome to Trump Tower, one of NYC’s least desirable luxury buildings. (Bloomberg)

The expanded Statue of Liberty museum is opening on Thursday featuring the original torch and other artifacts and exhibits highlighting the statue, island, and history. Only 20% of the people who step foot on the island visit the current museum. (amNY)

Amnesty International U.S.A. was set to sign a new lease at 88 Pine St until the new landlord said no. That landlord? The Chinese Government. (The Real Deal)

NYC Pride by the numbers on the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots. (amNY)

Carlos Danger is at large after serving 18-months in prison for sexting with a minor. (NY Times)

Uh oh. This is the start of talk of a subway strike. (NY Times)

Six historic LGBTQ sites may become NYC landmarks. (6sqft)

The trial of NYPD’s Daniel Pantaleo, accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal choke, continued with Pantaleo’s lawyer blaming Eric Garner’s death on Eric Garner. (Gothamist)

Can a chef who’s earned a two-star Michelin rating change school lunches for the better? (NY Times)

A wine and artisanal food festival at Industry City was interrupted by anti-rezoning protest, specifically aimed at the commercialization of the industrial sector. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci is bringing his masterpiece St. Jerome Praying in the Wilderness to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Time Out)

Council Member Barry Grodenchik has resigned as chair of the Committee on Parks and Recreation after admitting to paying improper attention to a Council staff member, including blowing a kiss to her across a table at a meeting. Gross. (Politico)

Don’t worry, he is “deeply sorry,” and he will not be losing his job on the City Council. (Gothamist)

There was a worry that if New Jersey passed marijuana legalization that New York would have to follow quickly. New Jersey legalized electric bikes and scooters, maybe this will be the kick in the pants that New York finally needs? (Streetsblog)

Photos from inside the Whitney’s Biennial. If you make your way to the Whitney, expect protests against board member Warren Kanders, who has ties to a manufacturer of tear gas canisters used against asylum seekers at the US-Mexico border. (Gothamist)

Rockaway Beach will be fully open this summer after a $10.7 million renovation to prevent catastrophic erosion. 348,000 cubic yards of sand were added to the beach. (Curbed)

Meet Liz Thomas, the professional long-distance hiker who is about to set out on a 175-mile, 100+ park, five borough hike across NYC. (Patch)

If you’ve seen groups of people camping near Central Park for a week, it’s not a protest or a performance art piece or anything like that. BTS is coming to Summerstage. (Gothamist)

The best parks for outdoor grilling. (amNY)

Are Summer Fridays a New York thing, or does it exist everywhere? (StreetEasy)

Today is the first hearing for the proposed fur ban, which pits activists against the fur industry. If New York enacts the ban, it would be following in the footsteps of San Francisco and Los Angeles. (amNY)

Video: A tour of the most expensive neighborhood in New York City. Take a guess on what you think it is before clicking. (Eric Conover)

Congrats! NYC is one of the worst places in the country to try and start a career. (Patch)

Congratulations to City Councilmember-elect Farah Louis on her victory in the special election to fill the vacant 45th City Council district seat. Louis received 41.81% of the vote, which was enough to win. (Kings County Politics)

Answers to the six biggest questions asked on Broadway each night. (NY Times)

The Wednesday Walk: “A Saturday afternoon circuit for some fatty food, but also when you want to seem a little cultured” (GoRoam)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 9, 2019 – The “Ignoring the Most Serious Health Violations” Edition

The NYPD demands an exemption to congestion pricing, wildlife BINGO, a chubby cat needs a home, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Want to play NYC wildlife BINGO? (Gothamist)

14 places to view cherry blossoms trees. (Untapped Cities)

73% of the most serious restaurant health violations go unchecked. Just cook your own food from here on out. (Eater)

The NYPD is demanding they should be exempt from congestion pricing. Not the cop cars, their personal cars. (Streetsblog)

Watch this NYPD officer run a red light on an illegal dirt bike without a helmet in front of a bunch of other cops cheering him on and crash, hitting the pavement HARD while trying to avoid getting hit by traffic. (@_scottjohnson)

Some of the most reckless NYPD drivers in the city are in Canarsie. (Streetsblog)

Take a look at the Tokyo neighborhood that inspired Hudson Yards. (6sqft)

The 9/11 Memorial Glade section of the 9/11 Memorial, dedicated to people with 9/11-related illnesses, will open at the end of May. (Curbed)

The estranged husband of the Staten Island teacher found dead and burnt inside a storage unit last week was formally accused of killing her along with his girlfriend. (Gothamist)

Is it time to finally look into extending the 4 train past the Utica Ave station? $5 million was allocated to a study in 2015 and the MTA just got around to getting it started. (Curbed)

Trying to discover the best burger in NYC. (Food Insider)

The five best picnic spots in the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez is open to the decriminalization of prostitution and would be open to a law that would legalize sex work. This is the same man who decriminalized marijuana in Brooklyn. (Gay City News)

Save this photo of old Penn Station from 1910 just in case you ever have to step foot in the dilapidated toilet that sits underneath Madison Square Garden. (Viewing NYC)

The mayor’s plan to turnaround schools with the Renewal program had a statistically insignificant effect on the targeted schools, but it was great at spending money. $773 million to be precise. The mayor said the results would be “fast and intense.” Half of the schools closed. (Chalkbeat)

Were #1! #1 in Lyme disease infections. (Patch)

This chubby cat needs a home. All 41 pounds of him. (Gothamist)

RIP Bob Slade, the creator and legendary radio host of the call-in program “Open Line.” (NY Times)

The mystery of why “1922 HYATT” was found on a nearly century-old subway wall has been solved. (amNY)

The street corner in Brooklyn where impaling pumpkins is de rigueur. (Atlas Obscura)

Add it to the list of deadly New York nightmares. A construction worker died on Monday morning after a piece of the building he was working on broke off and struck him on the head. (Gothamist)

The city ordered yeshivas to bar students who have not received the measles vaccine. (NY Post)

The reason electric bikes and scooters aren’t legal in New York? Blame Manhattan. (Streetsblog)

Here’s where to BYOB. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 3, 2019 – The “Ghosting Capital of the World” Edition

The plastic bag ban may birth a paper bag fee, New Yorkers disapprove of congestion pricing, Irving Plaza will temporarily close, and more in today’s daily NYC newsletter.

Bay Ridge’s greatest Italian hero is vegan? Sacrilege! (Eater)

With the eventual plastic bag ban taking place next year, the city is also considering a $0.05 fee for paper bags to benefit the NYC Environmental Protection Fund and go towards giving low-income New Yorkers and the elderly reusable bags for free. (Gothamist)

New York City is the capital of ghosting. 41% of New Yorkers say they’ve been ghosted, higher than any of the other 48 cities surveyed. (Time Out)

The Zagat guide book is coming back for New York City and your vote matters, much like participatory budgeting. You voted for participatory budgeting, right? (NY Times)

Here’s how the new mansion tax will affect luxury real estate. (Curbed)

The 10 best spots for plant classes. (6sqft)

We’re #1! #1 in the highest chunk of our paychecks that go towards taxes. (Patch)

Chanel Lewis is guilty of the 2016 killing of Karina Vetrano. It was Lewis’s second trial. (Gothamist)

Yesterday was one of six Gender Pay Gap days, and in New York, the gap has only gotten worse. (Gothamist)

The Tony Luke’s Philly cheesesteak has arrived in New York. Is it any good? (Grub Street)

So maybe escape rooms are dangerous if you, you know, can’t actually escape? (Gothamist)

Tracy Morgan got a key to Brooklyn, so what did he do with it? (amNY)

Governor Cuomo got an 11.7% raise this year and will get a 12.5% raise next year and an additional 11% in 2021. Not a bad job to have. (NY Post)

There’s a new chairman and CEO of the MTA, but it’s a little weird the state approved Pat Foye for the job on Monday morning at 2am. (Gothamist)

Governors Island’s 2019 season starts in a month and will have expanded hours and an additional ferry from Manhattan. (Curbed)

The Regional Planning Association has a suggestion to reduce traffic on the section of the BQE that needs repairs: reduce the number of lanes. (Curbed)

Missing from the state’s budget? No, not legal weed. No, not a pied-à-terre tax. No, not a ban on bump stocks. No, not increased oversight. Electric scooters. (Gothamist)

A Quinnipiac University poll shows that 54% of New Yorkers are against congestion pricing. The opposition is highest in the Bronx, where 62% disagree with the passing of the new rules. (NY State of Politics)

Also in the poll is that 57% of those surveyed favor changing admissions to the city’s specialized high schools. (NY Post)

Three alleged MS-13 members have been indicted on murder charges for the shooting death of a man on the 7 train platform on February 3. (Jackson Heights Post)

If you’ve ever stepped into the wrong car assuming it was your Lyft or Uber, you’re not alone. After the death of Samantha L. Josephson, who stepped into the wrong car in South Carolina, City council Speaker Corey Johnson says a bill requiring all for-hire drivers to have illuminated signs in their windows makes sense for NYC. (NY Post)

What’s behind the spike in murders in Brooklyn? (NY Times)

We’re just about to get Webster Hall back and now Irving Plaza announced it will close for eight months later this year for renovations. (BrooklynVegan)

The NYPD’s Inspector General’s Office recommended 42 reforms in a report. Of the 42, six have been implemented, 16 have been outright rejected and the rest sit in limbo. Must be nice to make your own rules. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio has suspended the proposed cuts to the FDNY, agreeing to meet with the department and unions to figure out a new deal. (NY Post)

Reports of rapes in the city have seen a slight decrease since last year, the second decrease in the last 18 months. Before December of 2018, the last time reported rapes had decreased was August 2017. (Patch)

The state budget called for a reduction of Special Olympics funding by $50,000, but after the federal government pulled all of its funding the state has reversed its decision. (NY State of Politics)

Where to eat and drink with your human (when you’re a dog). (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.