The Briefly for February 12, 2020 – The “Maybe You Have A Better Idea for This?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest on brokers fees, can you ever actually leave New York, a 10 layer sandwich to behold, Bloomberg doesn’t want you to hear this, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 45˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.

Thursday is the deadline for you to change political parties in New York state. (NY1)

A draft of Citi Bike’s Bronx expansion, mapped. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

A water main breaks in New York City literally every day. There gas been more than 400 recorded water main breaks every years since 1998. It’s rare, but becoming decreasingly so, that they cause subway delays. (James Barron for NY Times)

The city, having given up on the idea of fixing the Brooklyn Bridge’s promenade, is asking you, yes you, to help come up with “creative improvements.” For being a finalist and solving a problem the city has been plagued with for years, you’ll earn yourself $13,000 and you’ve only got until April 5. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Video: The locksmith working out of Manhattan’s smallest building. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Thinking about moving? A guide of where to live in NYC• in 2020. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Victor Calise could be the MTA’s first disabled board member. The mayor nominated Calise to fill the seat made vacant in April 2019 and still has another nomination to make. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Is J.G. Melon’s burger still among the city’s best burgers? According to Eater’s Ryan Rutton, it’s a simple answer of “no.” Order the chile con carne instead. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Nothing to see, just a car engulfed in flames in Crown Heights. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Photos and Video: Inside the home of Denny Daniel, which doubles as The Museum of Interesting Things. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re someone who has to conquer the biggest and the baddest challenges out there, maybe this 10-layer Mexican sandwich is your speed with hot dogs, ham, refried beans, beed Milanese, and more. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The REAL ID law is going to cause nightmares for everyone. Come October, you won’t be able to get on a domestic flight using your drivers license unless it’s a REAL ID license. The only way to get it is to physically go to the DMV, which is bound to cause a rush towards the end of the summer. Here’s what you need to know. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Where to eat in Manhattan’s Chinatown. (Eater)

It’s not common that a speakeasy and its cover story are both useful, but the newly opened The Little Shop near the South Street Seaport is a fully functioning bodega and speakeasy all wrapped into one. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Five legends of the Upper West Side. (Edgar Catasus for I Love the Upper West Side)

Get ready for a hand-painted Alice in Wonderland pop-up to dominate your Instagram feed starting next month. Behind the pop-up is Alexa Meade, the artist behind Ariana Grande’s “God is a Woman music video (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

What happens when you leave New York City?” Easy answer, you fall of the face of the earth. (David Crook for StreetEasy)

The Tavern by WS at Hudson Yards is “better than it should be.” Two stars. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

First you didn’t have to pay a brokers fee and now you have to? Here’s what’s going on with the brokers fee system. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Whoops, someone released a clip of Mike “please don’t say anything bad about me, I’ve spent a quarter billion dollars on this doomed presidential run” Bloomberg saying “The way you get the guns out of the kids’ hands is to throw them against the wall and frisk them,” in defense of Stop and Frisk. Bloomberg apologized for Stop and Frisk last November and maybe he thinks that’s all he’ll ever have to say on this subject? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The First Avenue L train station in Manhattan has a second new entrance on Avenue A. The entrance is not yet handicapped accessible and the MTA hopes elevators will be open by June. (Muhammad Rahman for Gothamist)

Meet the young district leader candidates looking to challenge Brooklyn’s democratic party’s status quo from the literal bottom up. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

13 bars to find a shot and beer combo for $5 or less. Unsurprisingly, I’ve been to all of these bars. (Erik Helin for Thrillist)

Thanks to my beautiful wife Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for November 1, 2019 – The “You Can’t Stop the Christmas Juggernaut” Edition

The weekend subway disruptions, everything about the 2019 NYC Marathon, MLB and Nike are screwing the Bronx, photos from Halloween, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend the clocks turn back an hour. Make sure to remember that on Sunday when looking at all your non-internet connected devices.

Getting around this weekend will continue to be tricky with the 3, 4, 6, 7, D, E, F, N, and R all with diversions. Maybe it’s best to follow the lead of the marathon and run where you need to go. Check the subways before you go. (Subway Weekender)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 NYC marathon. (Time Out)

Use this custom marathon subway map to find your way around the city on Sunday. (6sqft)

10 fun things to look for along the NYC Marathon route. (Untapped New York)

The best places to watch the marathon. (NY Times)

The corpse of Halloween isn’t even cool yet and the Winter Village at Bryant Park is officially open. (Time Out)

12 new public art installations to see in November. (Untapped New York)

Photos: The Village Halloween parade. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: West 69th St is a nice block that is very into Halloween. (Gothamist)

These political pumpkins spell out a simple message in the Village. (The Villager)

The story of how a sewing machine repair shop in the garment district run by a man with a penchant for collecting has become a trove of forgotten treasures and how he fights back the tourists that have no idea what his shop does. (NY Times)

There aren’t enough apartments in NYC. While that statement seems like the ramblings of a lunatic, it’s true according to “The Geography of Jobs” report, which shows that the city needs more housing to keep up with its explosive job growth. As a result, housing stock is increasing in Connecticut and New Jersey and more people are commuting. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball and Nike are working together to screw the Bronx. After city taxpayers paid $1.2 billion for Yankee Stadium, MLB and Nike cut a deal that only allows officially licensed MLB merchandise to be sold at “premium distribution points” near a stadium, which would freeze out nearly every business near Yankee Stadium from selling anything MLB-related. The Yankees’ COO has been working with MLB to resolve the issue, but as it stands right now eight businesses may find themselves up River Ave without a paddle. (amNewYork)

publicly said “something doesn’t fit” when it comes to Epstein’s death, stoking the interest of a million YouTube conspiracy theorists. (Politico)

It only took the mayor a day to roll back the heavily supported news that sidewalks on Fifth Ave would be expanded to make way for holiday window onlookers, saying that he hadn’t signed off on the idea yet. (amNewYork)

RIP Barneys. Sold for $270 million in bankruptcy court. (The Real Deal)

This is not how you play Untitled Goose Game. It is, however, how you capture a goose named Calista in Central Park with lead toxicity. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The city’s foie gras ban is, of course, going to be challenged in court. (Grub Street)

Say hello to New York, and the world’s, richest billionaires. (Patch)

Cultural Affairs Commissioner Tom Finkelpearl is leaving his job with coincidental timing after the Mother Frances Cabrini statue embarrassment. (Patch)

New data shows the NYPD rarely ever does anything with the honesty findings from the Civilian Complaint Review Board. 61 False Official Statement findings, which determine that an officer lied to investigators, were submitted and only five were substantiated. Another good reason to vote yes on question 2 in this year’s election. You can vote early through Sunday. (Gothamist)

Is a Wegmans a Wegmans without a Sub Shop? No serious, I don’t know the answer because I’m not someone who is insane for Wegmans. (Grub Street)

Take the stairs. More than 1,000 New York City elevators still need new inspections after faulty contractors gave them sub-par checks. (Patch)

The Times, always a few steps behind, has descended down the story of the Joker stairs between Shakespeare and Jerome Avenues. (NY Times)

10 raw bar picks. (Grub Street)

thanks to reader Mary for today’s fetured image!

The Briefly for August 26, 2019 – The “This Comes With A $10k Toilet” Edition

The US Open owes $300,000 in rent, Corey johnson writes for food access, New York’s red flag gun law goes into place, new restaurant openings and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Monday means another week of late-night subway changes and disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Queens Public Library’s Hunters Point branch is opening on September 24, after 4 years of construction. (Curbed)

All the big tech companies in the city, mapped. (The Real Deal)

Would you expect anything less than a $10,000 toilet in a $29 million home? (Architectural Digest)

The U.S. Open generates more than $750 million per year in “direct economic impact” to New York City and employs over 7,000 people each, but it also owes the city $300,000 in rent. (amNY)

Welcome to the weirdest office in the city. (Untapped Cities)

New York’s “red flag” gun bill went into effect over the weekend, which allows removal of their guns if a family member, law enforcement officer or educator successfully petitions the court. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Pacific Park, which was previously named Atlantic Yards, is the epicenter of the latest city vs state battle. The state gave approval for a massive underground gym to be added to the development and local officials are outraged that no concessions were made, especially since the developers are already behind in their commitment to creating affordable housing. (Brooklyn Paper)

Via for Schools will give parents and students the ability to track their bus’ locations in realtime. Last year thousands of kids experiencing multi-hour bus rides home from school. (Gothamist)

A federal appeals court upheld a rule that bans for-hire vehicles like Uber and Lyfts from having ads inside and on top of the vehicle.

New York’s license plates are changing, but the way they’re made will not be. License plates are made by prisoners earning $0.65/hour at the Auburn Correctional Facility. (Gothamist)

There have been no new measles cases reported in August and with the number stopped at 654, this may signal the end fo the measles outbreak that started in September 2018. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Department of Corrections at Rikers Island cannot legally put an 18 – 21-year-old in solitary confinement, but that doesn’t mean they haven’t found a new form of extreme isolation, this one without any restrictions. (Gothamist)

The Spotted Pig has been in trouble since owner Ken Friedman was accused of groping his female staffers and other sexual misconduct. Foot traffic is down because a declining number of people want to support a business owned by that kind of monster. Now, with foot traffic and revenue down, Ken Friedman sees the writing on the wall and is open to selling. (Eater)

Here are the buildings in the city with the most elevator complaints. (Curbed)

She’s been making breakfast on the city’s streets for over 35 years. Meet the woman behind Mama Jo’s Breakfast Cart and self-proclaimed oldest street vendor in New York City, Mama Jo. (Viewing NYC)

You may not be invited over to Meryl Streep’s townhouse, but you can see what it looks like on the inside through this $18.25 million real estate listing. (Curbed)

It’s late August and someone on the corner of First Ave and third Street just put their Christmas tree on the curb. Amazing. (EV Grieve)

Photos from the Official Animal Rights March. (EV Grieve)

6 ways to celebrate National Dog Day in New York City. (amNY)

Be careful with your children and dogs in Central Park, Prospect Park, and Morningside Park. Deadly, toxic algae blooms have been found in all three parks. The Prospect Park Dog Beach is still safe. These blooms are likely side-effects of the recent, intense rains which have been linked to climate change. (NY Times)

A look back at Mayor David Dinkins, 30 years after his historic 1989 election to become the first black mayor of New York City. (Gotham Gazette)

Corey Johnson’s latest op-ed argues that access to adequate, nutritious food is a human right. (Chelsea Now)

7 new restaurant openings. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to Leah Bassity for today’s featured image.