The Briefly for June 24, 2020 – The “Operation Righteous Cowboy Lightning” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The possible end of the to-go cocktail, fighting white supremacy in museums, Ample Hills finds a buyer, the City Council move to open beaches, and more

Today – Low: 74˚ High: 83˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Tired of waiting for the mayor, the City Council is set to introduce a bill this week that would force the beaches open. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Last night’s primary and election results. It’s still too early to declare winners due to the high volume of absentee voting, but Donovan Richards is leading for Queens Borough President, Jamaal Bowman has a sizable lead over incumbent Eliot Engel, Ritchie Torres is leading the pack in House District 15, AOC is cruising to victory, Yvette Clarke has a large lead, and Jerry Nadler is winning. (NY1)

How did the Democratic primary and election go yesterday?

Over 229,806 absentee ballots distributed in Manhattan for the Democratic primary, only 13% had been received before June 23. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Mayor de Blasio is tackling the city’s biggest problem. Obviously, that problem is Alternate Side Parking. For some reason, the mayor is making ASP more difficult to understand, only demanding that cars be moved once a week instead of multiple times. Of course, this doesn’t apply on streets where cars are only moved once a week. If this sounds complicated, it’s because the mayor took a subject that only pertains to 45% of households in the city and made it complicated. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Kudos to the people who chose to protest the mayor’s inaction on the amount of fireworks regularly being set off by sitting outside Gracie Mansion all night while laying on car horns. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Where are the illegal fireworks? Take a look at a map of the ballooning complaints across the city through the month of June. (Sydney Pereira, Clarisa Diaz, Jen Chung, Jake Dobkin, and Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

The mayor announced a crack down on fireworks, but don’t expect any relief on the nightly displays across the city. The mayor’s approach is mostly supply chain based and not enforcement based. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

In the hall of fame of bad ideas, this may be the king. The mayor announced that instead of a July 4th fireworks display, Macy’s will set off fireworks for five minutes, unannounced, on a nightly basis for every night next week and a highlights package will air on July 4th. This is the literal plot of the 30 Rock episode “Operation Righteous Cowboy Lightning” and it ends poorly. This truly is the Mayor de Blasio of fireworks displays. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Layleen Polanco, the trans woman who died in a Rikers Island solitary confinement cell last year, was pushed there by jailers over a doctor’s objections and despite her seizure disorder, according to a new report from thecdty’s Board of Corrections. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The complaint history of Daniel Pantaleo, whose illegal chokehold caused the death of Eric Garner, has been released and, surprise surprise, Daniel Panteleo was a piece of shit with seven misconduct complaints before using an illegal chokehold on Garner in 2014. (NY1)

The NYPD Tasered George Zapantis to death. Video was taken of Zapantis being taken from his home with hands tied behind his back has surfaced while four or five officers tased him and screamed at him not to resist arrest. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

The city’s criminal courts have a 39,200 case backlog right. The city’s justice is on hold and people waiting for trial are sitting in jail cells. (Alan Feuer, Nicole Hong, Benjamin Weiser and Jan Ransom for The City)

Museums can open their doors, if all goes according to plan, on July 20. The Metropolitan Museum of Art has plans to open on August 29. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

The Met Breuer will be closing for good in July, with The Frick moving in while its home on the Upper East Side gets renovated. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The Museum of Jewish Heritage is laying off over 40% of its staff due to the Covid-19 pandemic. (Colin Moynihan for NY Times)

“We write to inform you that your covert and overt white supremacy that has benefited the institution, through the unrecognized dedication and hard labor of Black/Brown employees, with the expectation that we remain complacent with the status quo, is over.”
An open letter to New York City’s Cultural Institutions

A look at the heroic efforts of the people who step in to help the pets of New Yorkers who become seriously ill with coronavirus. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Over a quarter-million of the city’s food jobs were lost since March, with only about 14,000 returning to work so far. It’s the lowest level of hospitality employment since before 1992. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The city’s cocktail-takeout law expires this weekend. Without action from Governor Cuomo, this is the end of the to-go cocktail. (Erika Adams for Eater)

There are only two kinds of people in the world, according to Serena Day, those who like Van Leeuwen and those who like Ample Hills. Which are you? (Serena Day for Eater)

Ample Hills was sold to Schmitt Industries for one million dollars. They were the only company to submit a qualifying bid. Technically the sale is pending with a court hearing set for June 30. (Erika Adams for Eater)

85 restaurants where you can eat outside today. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for June 9, 2020 – The “A Real Reason for the City’s Curfew” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: City Council investigates the police union, Mayor de Blasio’s staff protests him, what you can expect if you take the subway, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 84˚
Clear throughout the day.

The state Assembly passed the Eric Garner Anti-Chokehold Act. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Times goes deep on the backgrounds and possible motivations of Colinford Mattis and Urooj Rahman, who were arrested for allegedly throwing a Molotov cocktail into a police vehicle. (Nicole Hong and William K Rosenbaum for NY Times)

Bronx’s District Attorney Darcel Clark found “no criminality” in the death of Layleen Polanco, the 27-year-old Afro-Latina trans woman who died in her cell in Rikers Island a year ago. Polanco was in Rikers because she was unable to pay a $500 cash bail. Adding insult to injury is DA Clark’s use of Polanco’s deadname rather than her chosen name. (Harron Walker for Jezebel)

Video: A man drove his car through on the sidewalk through a group of peaceful protesters. After a week of beating the shit out of protesters all across the city for an entire week, watch the NYPD civilly confront him while arresting him. Yes, he was white, how did you know? (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

I hope you’re sitting down. The city’s police watchdog on Monday released its first-ever report on the NYPD’s treatment of young people, ages 10 to 18 — and found that boys who are black or Hispanic are disproportionately victims of cop misconduct. (Eileen Grench for The City)

A federal judge has ordered the NYPD to incorporate their formerly secret lists of police officers with dishonesty issues into an early intervention system, which will use data to identify officers exhibiting disturbing behavior. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

When the dust settles, remember who publicly defended the NYPD. Department of Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg said she would not commit to reducing or eliminating her agency’s partnership with the NYPD. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

“In a critical time of vicious income inequality and racial disparity, he has shown New York City he is not an ally to progressives. Real New Yorkers take firm stances on tough issues…And it’s high time the Mayor decides whether or not he’s in favor of the NYPD’s aggression or people’s dignity.” -Nicholas Tamborra, the vice president of the Lambda Independent Democrats (LID), an LGBTQ political club in Brooklyn. (Duncan Osbourn for Gay City News)

The mayor may not be comfortable with defunding the police, but he’s 100% comfortable with defunding affordable housing. It’s an issue that he supposedly cares about, but in his proposed budget he cuts over a billion dollars from the Department of Housing Preservation and Development. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Let’s check in with the latest progress on the L train construction. It’s not terrible, so there’s some good news today. (EV Grieve)

A guide to the city’s reopening. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The MTA wanted 60 miles of new busways for phase one of the city’s reopening. The mayor, never one to completely rise to any occasion, provided 20 miles of new busways on Jamaica Ave, Manhattan’s Fifth Ave, Brooklyn’s Jay Street, and E 181st St for car-free roads and four more for dedicated lanes. He also made the 14th St busway permanent. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The mayor said in an interview that it was his fear of Governor Cuomo taking over the situation that led him to institute the city’s curfew. Did all of this happen because Mayor de Blasio and Governor Cuomo can’t see eye to eye on anything? (NY1)

While this piece is about Mayor de Blasio defending the detaining of protesters for over 24 hours, there’s a tidbit about a rumor of NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea and Chief of Department Terence Monahan resigning. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The mayor won’t commit to a number when it comes to defunding the NYPD, but he’s made the smallest of changes. A small portion of the budget would be diverted to youth and social services for communities of color, the dollar amount is unknown. The NYPD won’t be responsible for overseeing street vendors, giving instead to a civilian agency. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

“We have been fighting for this for years now, and this is just the bare minimum.” The reaction to the NYPD not overseeing street vendors wasn’t exactly met with a huge reaction. The NYPD had previously written 18,000 tickets per year to vendors. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The City Council’s Oversight and Investigations Committee is calling for an investigation of the NYPD union that released personal information on Chiara de Blasio’s arrest. The SBA, which City Councilmember Richie Torres called a hate group, tweeted her height, weight, and address, which is a violation of the city’s charter. SBA president Ed Mullins is already under investigation for declaring “war” on the mayor in February. (Brigid Gergin for Gothamist)

You can no longer hide behind your black wife and children, you are exposed now. We are in a time when we need your leadership and it’s not there.” -NYC Public Advocate Jumaane Williams about Mayor de Blasio. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

Looking for a safe space while protesting? The city’s theaters and museums are opening their lobbies to help you. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Hundreds of current and former Mayor de Blasio staffers gathered for a protest of the mayor for his failure to protect Black and brown residents of the city that he swore he would shield from racist policing. (Terrell Jermaine Starr for The Root)

Photos: The Green-Wood Cemetery tribute to New Yorkers lost to Covid-19. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Workers in Amazon’s Staten Island warehouse are suing the company to ask for safer working conditions. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

14 notable NYC restaurants and bars that have now permanently closed. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Here’s what you can expect the next time you take the subway. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Governor Cuomo announced the city can resume elective surgeries and ambulatory care. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Say hello to Scott Wiener, the owner of the world’s largest pizza box collection and the founder of Slice out Hunger and Scott’s Pizza Tours. How many boxes you ask? 1,550. (Anne Ewbank for Atlas Obscura)

Video: Rep. Carolyn Maloney, Suraj Patel, Pete Harrison, Lauren Ashcraft debate ahead of the primary for New York’s 12th Congressional District. (Gotham Gazette)

The Columbus Circle Target is expected to open this fall instead of its original July 19th date. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Child abuse cases are down 51%, this is worrisome. (Nikita Stewart for NY Times)

35 restaurants supporting the Black community. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Chelsea for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 1, 2020 – The “Sworn to Protect” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Photos and video from the city’s George Floyd protests, Letitia James will be investigating, the city and state legislature’s reactions, and more

Today – Low: 52˚ High: 70˚
Clear throughout the day.

“When will it end? Amadou Diallo. 42 shots. Police officers found not guilty. Sean Bell. 50 shots. Police officers found not guilty. Eric Garner. Choked to death. Police officers let go by the Grand Jury. ” –Congressman Hakeem Jeffries (D-Brooklyn/Queens) on the floor of the House of Representatives

Video: The NYPD attempting to drive over a crowd of protestors. (@chieffymac11)

If those protesters had just gotten out of the way and not created an attempt to surround that vehicle, we would not be talking about this situation.” -Mayor de Blasio (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Video: An NYPD officer grabs a mask of a peaceful protestor whose hands are in the air and pepper sprays him. (@AJRupchandani)

I really believe that the NYPD knows how to handle protests and respect whoever is protesting but I want to see a light touch because people are undeniably angry for a reason.” -Mayor de Blasio (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

2021 mayoral candidate Dianne Morales’s children were pepper-sprayed outside the Barclays Center. “The violence and brutality the NYPD unleashed on protesters was staggering. So much rage targeted toward the very people they are sworn to protect.” (@Dianne4NYC)

I’m not going to blame officers who were trying to deal with an absolutely impossible situation.” – Mayor de Blasio (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

Video: An NYPD officer calls a protestor a “stupid f*****g bitch” and shoves her to the ground (Olivia Niland for BuzzFeed News)

“I want you to know that I’m extremely proud of the way you’ve comported yourselves in the face of such persistent danger, disrespect, and denigration” -NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea

Photos: State Senator Zellnor Myrie was pepper-sprayed by the NYPD. (@zellnor4ny)

“If you or anyone else was inside that police vehicle surrounded by people, you would’ve had a really tough decision to make” -Mayor de Blasio (Ja’han Jones for HuffPost)

Video: An officer from the 44th precinct purposefully coughing on people in the Bronx. (@biggaballa__)

“Anyone who starts off without acknowledging the righteousness of the protest and how do we address the concerns being raised is having an honest conversation.” -NYC Public Advocate Jumaane Williams (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)


“New Yorkers need a police department that respects them as citizens and human beings. Until then, this city that has suffered so much will suffer more.”
The Nation’s Largest Police Force Is Treating Us as an Enemy by Mara Gay for NY Times

“He should resign because his comments on Saturday night were brazen and disgusting lies. Two New York Police Department vehicles were filmed ramming into protesters behind a barricade. The mayor said the video was “upsetting” but claimed that it was “inappropriate for protesters to surround a police vehicle and threaten police officers,” adding that the officers had to “get out” of that “impossible” situation.”
Bill de Blasio Needs to Resign. By Defending Police Violence, He Has Betrayed New Yorkers by Mehdi Hasan for The Intercept.

“After years of disrespect and opprobrium, how did you expect things to turn out? By ignoring it, did you think it would just go away? That’s not how the world works.” – George Floyd protests are no time for us to ‘stick to sports’ by Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro

“Hitting police officers in the pocket and having them truly face prison time will in fact lead to less killings at the hands of the police. Let’s all make it a point to bring this discussion to every person we know and let’s put political candidates on the spot by asking them how they feel about this concept.” – Suing NYPD Officers Personally and Their Police Union for Violating Rights of Citizens Is The Change We Need by Kamal Smith for East New York News


The city remains on PAUSE, with 5/7 metrics met.

Here is how to report police misconduct. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The mayor’s first term started with his taking credit for the beginning of Mayor Bloomberg’s ending of stop-and-frisk, followed by the death of Eric Garner. He campaigned on reforming the NYPD and finds himself at the end of his second term defending the NYPD beating, ramming, and pepper spraying his citizens. (Dana Rubenstein and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

In 2014, after the murder of Eric Garner, Mayor de Blasio vowed to veto a bill that would make a chokehold illegal. The City Council is planning on calling the mayor out on his bullshit by putting the bill forward along with a bill that would require the NYPD to create a disciplinary matrix for all officers that would create a disciplinary standard. The City Council should put the bill forward, regardless of the threat of a veto by the mayor. If Mayor de Blasio doesn’t want the chokehold to be illegal, he should be forced to show it. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The NYPD’s Internal Affairs Bureau is recommending that Officer Francisco Garcia face internal charges for punching and tackling Donni Wright during a social distancing stop on the Lower East Side earlier this month. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Photos: The Times’ most striking photos of the weekend’s protests. (Photos by Chang W. Lee, Gabriela Bhaskar, Stephanie Keith, Kirsten Luce, Demetrius Freeman, and Hiroko Masuike for NY Times)

As the NYPD attempted to make arrests at the Barclays Center protest, they loaded people onto an MTA bus. The bus driver refused to drive it and walked the bus. HE has the support of the Transport Workers Union of America and they will act “in solidarity” with the bus drivers of Minneapolis. (Hillary Hanson for HuffPost)

State Attorney General Letitia James will lead an independent investigation into the NYPD’s actions while responding to Friday night’s protest outside Brooklyn’s Barclays Center. (Robert Pozarycki for Brooklyn Paper)

“I’m telling them that if that review looks at those videos and finds that there was improper police conduct there will be ramifications.” – Governor Cuomo (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Staten Island’s protest was led by Al Sharpton and Gwen Carr, Eric Garner’s mother, who finds herself mourning George Floyd, some of whose last words echoed those of her son. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

“I’m tired. I’m tired of seeing it, I’m tired of living it, I’m tired of being in fear. Something has to change.” Nearly a thousand protesters took to the streets of Jackson Heights and Woodside Saturday. (Angelica Acevedo, Jeffrey Harrell, Grant Lancaster, and Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The NYPD didn’t force every push in the city towards violence, as officers in Queens joined the Jackson Heights protest peacefully. (Zachary Gewelb for QNS)

A timeline of the nationwide George Floyd protests. (Derrick Bryson Taylor for NY Times)

Photos: Burnt out cop cars, graffiti, and anger. Sunday morning around Union Square. (Photos by Stacie Joy for EV Grieve)

The mayor has appointed two of his own commissioners — Corporation Counsel Jim Johnson and Department of Investigation Commissioner Margaret Garnett — to investigate the police response. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Two Brooklyn residents and a Greene County resident were charged in connection with the use of Molotov cocktails in an attempt to destroy NYPD vehicles during city-wide protests early Saturday morning. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The mayor edited a statement from the City Council’s Black, Latino and Asian Caucus, in a fashion that would suggest they took a neutral stance on police violence. Let’s be clear, they are not okay with the NYPD’s unnecessary reaction to this weekend’s protests. Read their full statement and their reaction to our cowardly mayor’s placation of the NYPD. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The state is ready to repeal a law known as 50-a, which protests police personnel records from public view. The state’s legislature has Governor Cuomo’s support to repeal the law. To quote Assemblymember Danny O’Donnell from Manhattan, “the pendulum swings both ways.” (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

Chiara de Blasio, the mayor’s daughter, was arrested Saturday night in Union Square amid protests. (NY1)

A palate cleanser: Video of the two baby guars that were born at the Bronx Zoo during the Covid-19 pandemic. We almost got through a full email without a mention of Covid-19. (Emily Davenport for Bronx Times)