The Briefly for July 23, 2019 – The “Maybe Hackers Can Run the Subways Better” Edition

The In-N-Out Burger mystery, the city’s power outages continue, the subway commuting disasters continue, in pursuit of the perfect ice cream sundae, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Department of Sanitation’s trash museum is only available to be seen once a month when Nelson Molina, the man behind the collection, gives tours, but a few hundred items of the collection is on display at the East Harlem Gallery as part of the “What is Here is Open” exhibition. (Curbed)

The MTA’s proposed express F service is, surprise surprise, opposed by the neighborhoods that don’t have express stops. (Brooklyn Paper)

Transit President Andy Byford hasn’t said what caused Friday’s monumental screw up with the subways, but he has said that it was not the result of outside tampering. At this point, maybe Russia can run our transit system better than the people in charge. (amNY)

Another day, another commuting nightmare. Monday night’s 2, 3, 4, and 5 trains were mostly out of service in Brooklyn fur to faulty signals. Combine that with a storm that provided limited transportation alternatives and it’s just another day on the subways. (Gothamist)

The closest In-N-Out Burger to NYC might be in Texas, so how did a pristine Double-Double end up on the street in Jamaica, Queens? (QNS)

The Department of Education says that they “successfully completed remediation work” or removing lead from the drinking water at many Bushwick schools, but three schools are showing higher levels of lead in the drinking water after the work was complete. (Bushwick Daily)

How far would you go to protect your view? The residents of a building in Chelsea bought the air rights to a neighboring property for $11 million so their views of the Empire State Building remained disturbed. (Curbed)

Photos from Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story remake. (Untapped Cities)

A new city council bill with 22 co-sponsors will fine businesses $1,000 for not accepting cash or charging cash-paying customers more, with a few exceptions, if it is approved. (amNY)

I am the left.” The governor has never been shy about talking shit when it comes to his fellow Democrats. (NY Times)

Despite their performance as of late, including the sky-lighting incident in Astoria and the pipe-explosion in Flatiron, ConEd wants to raise its rates for electricity. What do they think they are, the MTA? (The Indypendent)

50,000 New Yorkers were without power on Sunday and as of Monday morning, there were still 19,000 that were left in the dark. A portion of the blackout was intentionally caused by ConEd in a supposed attempt to prevent wider outages. (Curbed)

The mayor is calling for an investigation to whether the city needs a new entity to provide electricity. The governor has already made direct threats towards replacing ConEd. (Politico)

Why did ConEd choose the neighborhoods that it did in Southeast Brooklyn to intentionally blackout? What was it about Bergen Beach, Mill Basin, Flatlands, and Canarsie made them different than Park Slope, Sunset Park, Clinton Hill, Carroll Gardens, or Dumbo to have their power intentionally shut off? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you lost power, you can fill out a form on ConEd’s website to get some money back. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

In pursuit of the perfect sundae. (Grub Street)

10 suggestions to fix the lighting in your dim apartment. (Street Easy)

Declawing cats is officially illegal in New York state. Technically “declawing” is an amputation surgery which removes the first bone of the cat’s toe and also takes with it tendons and muscles. Unnecessary declawing carries with it a fine. (Gothamist)

Remember the 7 train’s falling debris problem? Never ones to be accused of anything that has the appearance of being timely, the MTA is finally testing new netting to prevent future impalings of anything that dares travel below a 7 train. (amNY)

Ever wonder what a manhole explosion looks like? Here’s a video. (Greenpointers)

The attorney general’s office is invoking the “Son of Sam Law” to prevent the Soho Grifter Anna Sorokin’s profit off the sale of her life rights to Netflix. The Son of Sam Law prevents offenders from profiting off their crimes. (Gothamist)

If you had to do your job using faulty video conferencing systems, you’d be frustrated. If your job was a court interpreter at immigration hearings, it’s orders of magnitude larger than simple frustration. (Gothamist)

Two lawsuits have accused the governor of trying to diminish their power by changing the state’s fusion voting system. (NY Times)

15 secrets of The Frick Collection. (Untapped Cities)

The first report from the federal monitor in charge of overseeing the city’s lead problems in NYCHA developments isn’t very encouraging. (amNY)

The state is considering banning the sale of your phone’s location without your express permission. The bill will be introduced on Tuesday. (NY Times)

“Where should we eat?” says your friend/family member/rando on the street who is visiting New York for the first time. Suddenly you freeze because your collection of restaurants that you visit regularly don’t seem adequate for someone visiting for the weekend and may never return. The first timer’s guide to eating in NYC. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for July 10, 2019 – The “20,000 People Buried Under Washington Square Park” Edition

Today’s US Women’s National Team parade, a series of stabbings, here comes an express F train, the latest in the BQE rehab, Arcade Bakery is closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Saw Mill Playground in Mott Haven reopened with the added bonus of being outfitted with infrastructure that can handle stormwater runoff, up to 1.3 million gallons a year. (Bronx Times)

The cross-town rivalry has been rekindled, but replace town with the country. With DeNiro opening a new studio complex and Netflix expanding big in New York, we’re ready to challenge Hollywood. (NY Times)

Transit Alternatives held a “mass die-in” in Washington Square Park on Tuesday, protesting the street safety crisis that has lead to 15 cyclists killed by drivers in 2019. (amNY)

If you’re someone who gets creeped out at the idea of bodies being buried in common locations in the city, this story isn’t for you. Bone fragments that were found during construction in Washington Square Park were removed during construction will be reinterred at the park. Washington Square Park was once a potter’s field, a common mass grave, and there’s an estimated 20,000 who were buried there. (Downtown Express)

Everyone loves a sale, except when it comes to real estate. It’s counter-intuitive, but the numbers show that price cuts on homes in NYC don’t work in the same fashion as they do at Old Navy. (Street Easy)

If you’re looking for your first home to purchase, congrats, NYC is among the country’s worst places to buy your first home thanks to metrics like friendliness to first-time buyers, affordability, real estate taxes, and crime. (Patch)

8 no car needed day trips away from the city. (NY Times)

Take a look at the first section of Shirley Chisholm State Park that recently opened. (Untapped Cities)

You can live like a convicted felon! Two of Paul Manafort’s homes are for sale as he sits in jail for seven-and-a-half years. (Street Easy)

So, uh, maybe in 2019 it’s time for Big Gay Ice Cream to change the name of their “Salty Pimp” ice cream? (Eater)

The mayor is calling for more transparency and oversight surrounding taxi medallions after a 45-day review of what’s lead to the financial crisis in the taxi industry. Medallion owners and a portion of the city council were calling for a bailout, but the mayor’s plan falls short of including one. (Gothamist)

The Wing is expanding its women-only coworking empire with an additional outpost in Williamsburg and another in Bryant Park. (Curbed)

The mayor’s plan to close Rikers, explained. (Curbed)

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams isn’t having it, asking the city to reduce the size of the detention complex planned for Atlantic Avenue to 900 beds from 1,150. Adams also requesting for more health services in jails to reduce recidivism. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you never want your Stranger Things experience to end, Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein are performing music from the show in October at Brooklyn Steel. Tickets go on sale this Friday. (BrooklynVegan)

Has summer finally made the city feral? A New Jersey man crashed his car into a blockade near a federal building downtown claiming he had a bomb in his car. The bomb squad determined he did not. (Gothamist)

A woman was stabbed to death at the Sutter Avenue-Rutland Road 3 train station on Monday night. Someone was taken into custody, but no charges were files at publication. (amNY)

A woman was stabbed in the Gowanus Whole Foods parking lot on Monday night. A suspect, Rodney Robinson, was arrested and charged. The victim was treated at a nearby hospital. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s go-to spots for French pastries, Arcade Bakery, will be closing. Roger Gural cites rheumatoid arthritis as the reason he’s closing. (Eater)

Roger Gural’s and Karen Bornarth’s recipe for croissants. With 33 steps, it’s probably easier to experience them yourself at the bakery. (Serious Eats)

The NYPD wasted no time towing cars away from the newly demapped area of Willets Point, freeing up the area for redevelopment. (QNS)

It’s an alternative community art space that’s in the location of a former taxi cab garage. No, this one’s no in Bushwick, it’s in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

There are 114 uncounted votes in the Katz/Cabán primary that were rejected for errors by poll workers. The current vote separation is 16 and are hundreds of ballots that were rejected and with such a slim lead, each one will become a legal fight of its own. (The Indypendent)

Watch a time-lapse of the installation of Phenomenal Nature—Mrinalini Mukherjee at the Met Breuer. (Viewing NYC)

The BQE rehab panel won’t accept any new concepts and have hinted that they will be suggesting a less severe plan than the ones that would require the removal of the Brooklyn Promenade. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here comes DragCon. (amNY)

How to watch today’s U.S. Women’s National Team’s parade, which starts at 9:30 this morning. (Curbed)

Some Nike subway ads featuring Megan Rapinoe were vandalized in what the NYPD says is a potential hate crime. (amNY)

When the parade is all over, 350 sanitation workers and 19 trucks will begin their job of cleaning up the revelry. (amNY)

Pre-foreclosures are up 43% in the city, with the largest number of them coming from East New York. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The MTA is adding some F express trains in Brooklyn to the morning and evening commutes in an attempt to shave some commuting times down. (amNY)

9 great theater district restaurants for before or after a show. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for June 6, 2019 – The “We Can’t Stop The Ratpocalypse or Rising Sea Levels” Edition

The MTA discrimination disability lawsuit can move forward, ThriveNYC is failing the city’s schools, Uber will helicopter you between Manhattan and JFK, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Uber is offering helicopter rides between lower Manhattan and JFK Airport. Uber Copter kicks off on July 9 and will be available during afternoon commutes. (NY Times)

The Department of Housing Preservation and Development is pushing a new program that would name a “Tenant of Record,” which would end succession rights, which allows relatives to take over their homes after the primary resident dies or moves out. (Patch)

We are headed for a ratpocalypse. Is climate change to blame? (Grist)

Before steam, NYC homes were heated with coal. If you look carefully on some sidewalks you can still find “coal holes,” which allowed for easy delivery. (Ephemeral New York)

After 20 years and two locations, Park Slope’s gay bar Excelsior will close on July 31. This is the second closure due to rising rents. (Brooklyn Paper)

A sealed arrest record is supposed to reduce the unjust and disproportionately burdensome effect of those records on minorities. The NYPD has decided to have its own interpretation of the law. (Gothamist)

Congrats to this year’s Excellence in Design winners, which “reflect the very best of design in public works, housing, and libraries, parks, and public art.” (Curbed)

Notice something new floating around the city this week? The Sing for Hope pianos are back, celebrating their 500th piano. You’ve got until June 23 to find a piano in the city before they are donated to schools, healthcare facilities, and community centers. (Untapped Cities)

The NYPD is withholding its lists of which officers work at which precincts, claiming stating who is working where would endanger public safety. A lawsuit from the Legal Aid Society will decide if that reasoning is valid. (Patch)

A Midtown fender bender is not news, but it is when one of the cars is driven by Tracy Morgan and it’s a new $2 million Bugatti. (Gothamist)

It seems former prosecutor in the Central Park Five case Linda Fairstein doesn’t know about the Streisand Effect. The woman who coerced confessions from children about a crime they didn’t commit took to the internet to defend her honor after being forced to resign from Vassar’s board of trustees from a student body that did not want her there because of her involvement in the case. (The Root)

Where to eat something quick if you’re running late to a Broadway show. (The Infatuation)

How long would you stay in a rent-stabilized apartment if you could? Ed Higgins has been renting an apartment on Ludlow St for 43 years. His rent in 1976 was $100 a month and now it’s still under $600. (6sqft)

Polly Trottenberg, a voice of sanity on the MTA’s board, is resigning effective immediately upon being replaced. She was a de Blasio nomination in 2014 and has been highly critical of Governor Cuomo’s initiatives in the past. She did not state a reason for her resignation. (Politico)

What’s going on with the F train this week? A dead baby shark (do do do do do do) was found on an F train platform in Manhattan. (Gothamist)

The city’s Fair Fares program has 50,000 participants, and a big help was the expansion of the program in April. The program will expand in 2020 to any New Yorker living under the poverty line. (Curbed)

The de Blasio administration has begun seizing ice cream trucks from owners who are accused of evading nearly $4.5 million in fines. It seems that shell corporations aren’t just for our presidents anymore, because 76 ice cream trucks changed hands between shell corporations to avoid paying traffic and parking tickets. The city has seized 46 trucks so far. (Patch)

It seems the one thing the city’s politicians can agree on is the new entrance designs for Penn Station. (Downtown Express)

ThriveNYC provides no tangible support for the city’s students and councilmember Mark Treyger is calling for a “significant investment” in social and emotional services for students. There are over one million students in the city’s public schools and only 1,335 social workers, 2,958 guidance counselors and 560 school psychologists supporting those students. There are more safety agents than all those combined. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A paid witness used by the defense of Daniel Pantaleo, the officer accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal chokehold, claimed Garner’s death could not have been caused by the hold. He was not present when it occurred and his appearance in court was paid by the defense. (amNY)

Over 100,000,000 have seen The Lion King on Broadway with over 9,000 performances, which are two staggering numbers. (CBS New York)

Councilman Antonio Reynoso announced he is running for Brooklyn Borough President once Eric Adams’ term limits have run out in 2021. (Brooklyn Paper)

After months of presentations and public feedback, the MTA announced a draft plan to improve the Bronx’s buses by improving speeds, reliability and streamlining routes that haven’t changed in decades. (Curbed)

The lawsuit against the MTA that would force the construction of elevators whenever a station is closed for improvements was given the go-ahead in the state’s supreme court, stating the MTA is not about the city’s Human Rights Law’s prohibition of discrimination based on disability. (amNY)

15 stellar spots for raw bar. (Eater)

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