The Briefly for August 4, 2020 – The “Batten Down the Hatches!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The reason for the spike in shootings, Open Restaurants will continue next year, how to stay safe on mass transit, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 81˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.

President Trump and his company are being investigated for possible bank and insurance fraud by Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance. (William K. Rashbaum and Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is once again open to visitors. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

The city is getting ready for a storm surge of 1-2 feet during Tuesday’s expected downpour from Tropical Storm Isaias. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Photos: Eataly’s new summer rooftop restaurant, opening on August 7. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

According to an NYC Hospitality Alliance survey, only 17.2% of restaurants and bars say they’re able to pay 50% or more of their rent. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

One-third of the city’s small businesses may close forever, according to a report from the Partnership for New York City with job losses already at 520,000. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

New York state is extending its unemployment insurance past the 26-week limit through the end of the year. (East New York News)

All about rent increases. When can it happen, how much can it be, and how to check if your apartment is stabilized. (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

The NYPD’s 26th Precinct has a Twitter problem. The precinct is in the heart of Harlem and their Twitter account has a history of hitting the like button on tweets about conspiracy theories, QAnon, and Trump. After being caught, the account removed the likes. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Evergreen headline for the moment: “The NYPD is investigating shootings.” (Rocco Vertuccio for NY1)

The mayor has his own ideas, as does Commissioner Shea, but the data shows the reason for the city’s spike in shootings is a plummeting number of gun crime arrests. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

NYPD officer Richard Catapano was found dead in his Astoria apartment from an apparent suicide. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Enjoying Open Restaurants? They’ll be back next year, starting on June 1. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

In addition to Open Restaurants returning next year, the city is making curbside dining permanent from June 1 to October 31. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Photos: See the 193 new Rockefeller Center flags designed by the public. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Photos: 22 new libraries opened this week to offer grab-and-go service. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Maintenance workers and security guards at Columbia University will not be going on strike after TWO Local 241 reached an agreement with the university. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

The most expensive area to live in the city during the first half of the year was the 10014 zip code, covering the West Village and Greenwich Village will set you back a median price of $4.2 million. Tribeca’s 10013 was in second place at $3.1 million. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A walk through Prospect Park from dog beach to Parkside Avenue. (ActionKid)

A Walgreen grows in Brooklyn. (Greenpointers)

A basket intended to prevent debris from falling off of elevated subway tracks onto pedestrians… fell onto a pedestrian on Sunday. An NYC Transit Interim SVP calling it “a very unfortunate incident.” The person hit was taken to the hospital and was reported to be in stable condition. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

If the city’s schools open, what is the city’s plan to get all 150,000 students who rely on buses to school? “The DOE is recommending that families, wherever possible, help reduce the number of students in need of busing by either transporting their children to school on their own, walking, or biking,” aka “you’re on your own.” Got it. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Video: Drone footage of all eight Black Lives Matter murals in NYC. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist, video from @mingomatic)

Despite the city’s plans to reopen the schools for the fall, Governor Cuomo has yet to make a decision to allow any school in the state to reopen. He’s expected to announce a decision this week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Shootings jumped 177% in July compared to last year, according to the NYPD. Assaults and reported rapes declined year-over-year. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Black Lives Matter mural walls in Gowanus were defaced with the tired response of “All Lives Matter.” This is the wall that was accidentally painted over once, so I have confidence that this will be fixed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Photos and Video: The red-tailed hawks of Governors Island. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Tips on how to stay safer on mass transit. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

Photos: What the hell is going on with the splashes of blood outside this meat market in Astoria? (Give Me Astoria)

Can you think of a good reason that Williamsburg has more trash cans than Bed Stuy? No, seriously, it’s not a setup to a joke. “Bed Stuy Strong, Safe and Sanitary” wants your input. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Meet Diana Florence, a candidate for Manhattan District Attorney and a former leader of the Construction Fraud Task Force within the DA’s office. She stepped down in January amid allegations that she withheld evidence. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

Facebook signed its 730,000 square foot lease in the Farley Post Office building. When will it move in? That’s a whole other story. (Rich Bockmann for The Real Deal)

A judge weighed in on some disputed ballots in NY-12’s Democratic congressional primary allowing some invalidated votes to be counted, but not enough to sway the primary away from incumbent Carolyn Maloney towards challenger Suraj Patel. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

15 summery brunch options for takeout and delivery. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 23, 2020 – The “Are These NYC’s Bad Old Days?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It’s primary day in NYC, a look at the rules of outdoor dining in phase two, surprising chickens in a drug bust, the NY Post’s “copaganda,” and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 82˚
Possible drizzle overnight.

Here’s how to vote in today’s primary. (BKLYNER)

Today is the primary across the city, but don’t expect results so quickly this time around. Absentee ballots aren’t counted until eight days past the election. We could be waiting a while. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

In the hall of fame of bad ideas, let me introduce you to the stacked highways all across Manhattan idea from the 1930s. (Joshua Mu for Viewing NYC)

After a spike in gun violence over the weekend, the mayor said the city isn’t going back to the bad old days where there was “so much violence in this city,” but also “Nor are we going back to the bad old days where policing was done the wrong way.” According to that statement, we are currently living in “the bad old days.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

With phase two, the city’s playgrounds have reopened. They are literally no safer than they used to be, so don’t expect sanitization or regular cleanings. (Donna Duarte-Ladd for amNewYork Metro)

The city formally announced that phase two would start on Monday on Thursday, giving restaurants four days to prepare and comply with a new set of regulations for outdoor dining. (Gary He for Eater)

What to expect from phase two of NYC’s reopening. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Here are the guidelines for reopened restaurants as a part of phase two. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

More than 3,000 restaurants have signed up to set up outdoor dining as the city enters the second phase of its reopening. The restaurants approved will be allowed to set up tables and chairs in parking spaces and sidewalks. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The state moratorium on evictions ended over the weekend. There are advocacy groups that are estimating 50,000 – 60,000 cases could be filed in the next few days. This is the first wave of expected cases, another protection for people who were directly affected by Covid-19 expires in August. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hundreds of people gathered in protest to demand the eviction ban continues until the state has recovered from the Covid-19 crisis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

An investigation is ongoing after a man fell onto the tracks and was hit and killed by the 7 train on Sunday night. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

“Back in my day, if you wanted to go to a Target, you had to go to Brooklyn, the Bronx, or New Jersey” is what very lame grandparents will tell their grandkids. Target announced it is opening stores on the Upper East and West Sides. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Facebook is eyeing expanding its footprint in the Hudson Yards, taking over the space that will be left vacant by Neiman Marcus’s bankruptcy. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos and Video: 10,000+ riders took part in the Street Riders’ Black Lives Matter Ride through Manhattan. Fun fact, more people showed up for the ride than turned out for Trump’s Tulsa rally. (Amanda Hatfield, photos by Toby Tenenbaum for BrooklynVegan)

Heads up: The produce at this week’s farmers markets should be fantastic. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to a loophole about how the NYPD’s cars are funded, the two lawyers that are accused of tossing Molotov cocktails into empty police cars may be facing life in prison. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A look at the NY Post’s recent history of running “copaganda” articles that share police narratives with anonymous sourcing, zero additional verification, and in contradiction of facts. (Kay Dervishi for City and State)

The NYPD are known liars. Despite their crying in public about being “poisoned” by Shake Shack employees, a thorough review shows that the officers involved never displayed any symptoms of illness and the Shake Shack employees couldn’t have known that the order was for NYPD officers because the order was placed online. Despite this, police unions sent out information that the officers had started throwing up and invented a narrative of Antifa employees inside Shake Shack. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea testified in defense of the police’s actions against protesters during the first week of June without providing details and dodging every possible question that involved specifics and dismissed a delivery person’s arrest as a “false report.” (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Look around the city and you’ll see iconic statues wearing face masks. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

What is usually the best party in the city every year, the Mermaid Parade, is going to be virtual and take place on August 29. (Amanda Hatfield for Brooklyn Vegan)

The Inwood rezoning lawsuit, which was ruled that the de Blasio administration failed to account for the potential change in the racial makeup of the neighborhood, could forever change how the city plans neighborhoods towards something more equitable. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Members of Sure We Can, the city’s only nonprofit redemption center, is requesting $2.3 million from the city’s budget, saying they will have to close their Bushwick location that it has occupied for ten years without it, where hundreds of canners gather each morning to sort and redeem their bottles and cans.  (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The surprising part of this drug bust was unrelated to the drugs, it was the chickens. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The man who tried to escape Rikers Island on Thursday made another attempt to escape on Sunday. According to inmates at Rikers, the measures taken to combat Covid-19 have made Rikers intolerable. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Okay, phase two is in effect, but let’s look at what phase three could mean for the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

28 restaurants open for outdoor dining this week. (Eater)

The Briefly for May 22, 2020 – The “The Beaches Will Be Open This Weekend” Memorial Day Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A new plan for Long Island City, a threat to SantaCon, Scarr’s Pizza and McSorley return, late-night fireworks, restaurant reopenings to celebrate, and more

Today – Low: 60˚ High: 69˚
Possible drizzle in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 53˚ High: 65˚

Do you have blood? Can you spare some? The city’s blood supply is running “dangerously low.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What are you doing to experience new things while staying at home? SNL’s Heidi Gardner is trying a new cereal each week. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

If the ban on city dwellers continues, City Council Member Keith Powers has threatened to cancel SantaCon and ban Long Islanders from St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. Please? Will you promise? (Adam Nichols for Patch)

After a week of back and forth, the city’s beaches will be open this weekend, but with no lifeguards and swimming won’t be allowed. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Nathan’s is the biggest game in Coney Island hot dogs right now, but they got there by playing dirty. Coney Island’s original hot dogger is Feltman’s. (Alyson Krueger for NY Times)

McSorley’s is back after its longest closure since opening in 1854. (EV Grieve)

Scarr’s Pizza is back too. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Archdiocese of NY shared a “Faith Forward” plan, which outlines a five-step plan to reopen New York’s churches. (Ron Lee for NY1)

Religious institutions can begin holding services, assuming they limit occupancy to ten or fewer people indoors, everyone must wear a mask and follow social distancing protocols. (NY1)

Some suggested Memorial Day reading, care of the city’s independent book shops. (Danielle Valente for Time Out)

The mayor ran for office on the idea that he wanted to bridge the gap between the two New York Cities, but if you look at the neighborhoods that have received open streets and those that have not, he’s continuing in the tradition he rallied against by denying some of the hardest-hit neighborhoods by the Covid-19 virus open spaces. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

State Assemblymember Carmen Arroyo has been removed from the Democratic primary ballot after being caught altering signatures and dates on her petition to remain on the ballot. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Central Park Park Ranger Ashley Whited rescued a team of orphaned ducks after a snapping turtle attacked and killed their mother. (Anthony Pascale for NY1)

The pandemic has shown what has always been possible, including to-go drinks from bars and restaurants. State Senator Brad Hoylman introduced legislation that would allow bars and restaurants to sell to-go drinks for two years after the pandemic is over. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

This weekend kicks off the Loisaida Festival, digitally of course. (EV Grieve)

Here’s the latest plan from a giant developer for the “future” of Long Island City, leaning heavily on commercial property, with 10-to-12 million square feet of space on 28 acres of land surrounding the area that Amazon HQ2 never was. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

Big companies like Facebook and Mastercard are rethinking massive leases in Manhattan after allowing employees to work remotely on an ongoing basis. Facebook is or was close to signing a lease int he Farley Post Office building next to Penn Station, so it remains to be seen if they’ll go through with the deal. I guess you could say it’s complicated 🥴. (Danielle Balbi for The Real Deal)

Video: Climbing to the top of the Woolworth Building, in what appears to be less than legal means. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The mayor says the city could be on its way to start phase one of reopening in the first half of June. This is, of course, not a guarantee, and we’ll have to see how well the city fares during this holiday weekend as temperatures are looking favorable. One spike and we ain’t opening in June. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

I don’t know if it’s welcome news, but it’s a step towards normalcy. Beginning on Monday, you can file lawsuits electronically for the first time in multiple weeks. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

A guide to New York’s contact tracing programs. (Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

With the rise of MIS-C cases in the state, Governor Cuomo hasn’t made a decision about summer camps across the state, but it’s looking less likely. (Zack Fink for NY1)

176,000 students will be attending summer school, but it won’t be in person. The governor canceled in-person summer classes. The governor went as far as to say that it’s in question if schools will reopen in the fall. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved an $8 million project to install a new pedestrian plaza beneath Brooklyn Bridge Park, which will replace a fenced-in parking lot, which is there today. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

What is New York without New York bars? (Megan Abbott for NY Times)

Ridership is on an uptick, so the Staten Island ferry will increase its rush-hour service. (NY1)

Fleet Week is still happening… virtually? (Ron Lee for NY1)

15 restaurants and bars that have permanently closed because of the coronavirus. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

This shouldn’t be a surprise, but that all-male restaurant panel the president has convened, which called him “one of us,” ain’t gonna help. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Here are the CDC’s guidance on using cloth face coverings. (Norwood News)

Is this NYC’s oldest manhole cover? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

* Seinfeld voice* What’s the deal with all these late-night fireworks? (David Cruz for Gothamist)

8 restaurant reopenings to be excited about this week. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Thank you to reader Shiloh for today’s featured photo!