The Briefly for May 22, 2020 – The “The Beaches Will Be Open This Weekend” Memorial Day Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A new plan for Long Island City, a threat to SantaCon, Scarr’s Pizza and McSorley return, late-night fireworks, restaurant reopenings to celebrate, and more

Today – Low: 60˚ High: 69˚
Possible drizzle in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 53˚ High: 65˚

Do you have blood? Can you spare some? The city’s blood supply is running “dangerously low.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What are you doing to experience new things while staying at home? SNL’s Heidi Gardner is trying a new cereal each week. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

If the ban on city dwellers continues, City Council Member Keith Powers has threatened to cancel SantaCon and ban Long Islanders from St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. Please? Will you promise? (Adam Nichols for Patch)

After a week of back and forth, the city’s beaches will be open this weekend, but with no lifeguards and swimming won’t be allowed. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Nathan’s is the biggest game in Coney Island hot dogs right now, but they got there by playing dirty. Coney Island’s original hot dogger is Feltman’s. (Alyson Krueger for NY Times)

McSorley’s is back after its longest closure since opening in 1854. (EV Grieve)

Scarr’s Pizza is back too. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Archdiocese of NY shared a “Faith Forward” plan, which outlines a five-step plan to reopen New York’s churches. (Ron Lee for NY1)

Religious institutions can begin holding services, assuming they limit occupancy to ten or fewer people indoors, everyone must wear a mask and follow social distancing protocols. (NY1)

Some suggested Memorial Day reading, care of the city’s independent book shops. (Danielle Valente for Time Out)

The mayor ran for office on the idea that he wanted to bridge the gap between the two New York Cities, but if you look at the neighborhoods that have received open streets and those that have not, he’s continuing in the tradition he rallied against by denying some of the hardest-hit neighborhoods by the Covid-19 virus open spaces. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

State Assemblymember Carmen Arroyo has been removed from the Democratic primary ballot after being caught altering signatures and dates on her petition to remain on the ballot. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Central Park Park Ranger Ashley Whited rescued a team of orphaned ducks after a snapping turtle attacked and killed their mother. (Anthony Pascale for NY1)

The pandemic has shown what has always been possible, including to-go drinks from bars and restaurants. State Senator Brad Hoylman introduced legislation that would allow bars and restaurants to sell to-go drinks for two years after the pandemic is over. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

This weekend kicks off the Loisaida Festival, digitally of course. (EV Grieve)

Here’s the latest plan from a giant developer for the “future” of Long Island City, leaning heavily on commercial property, with 10-to-12 million square feet of space on 28 acres of land surrounding the area that Amazon HQ2 never was. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

Big companies like Facebook and Mastercard are rethinking massive leases in Manhattan after allowing employees to work remotely on an ongoing basis. Facebook is or was close to signing a lease int he Farley Post Office building next to Penn Station, so it remains to be seen if they’ll go through with the deal. I guess you could say it’s complicated 🥴. (Danielle Balbi for The Real Deal)

Video: Climbing to the top of the Woolworth Building, in what appears to be less than legal means. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The mayor says the city could be on its way to start phase one of reopening in the first half of June. This is, of course, not a guarantee, and we’ll have to see how well the city fares during this holiday weekend as temperatures are looking favorable. One spike and we ain’t opening in June. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

I don’t know if it’s welcome news, but it’s a step towards normalcy. Beginning on Monday, you can file lawsuits electronically for the first time in multiple weeks. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

A guide to New York’s contact tracing programs. (Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

With the rise of MIS-C cases in the state, Governor Cuomo hasn’t made a decision about summer camps across the state, but it’s looking less likely. (Zack Fink for NY1)

176,000 students will be attending summer school, but it won’t be in person. The governor canceled in-person summer classes. The governor went as far as to say that it’s in question if schools will reopen in the fall. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved an $8 million project to install a new pedestrian plaza beneath Brooklyn Bridge Park, which will replace a fenced-in parking lot, which is there today. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

What is New York without New York bars? (Megan Abbott for NY Times)

Ridership is on an uptick, so the Staten Island ferry will increase its rush-hour service. (NY1)

Fleet Week is still happening… virtually? (Ron Lee for NY1)

15 restaurants and bars that have permanently closed because of the coronavirus. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

This shouldn’t be a surprise, but that all-male restaurant panel the president has convened, which called him “one of us,” ain’t gonna help. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Here are the CDC’s guidance on using cloth face coverings. (Norwood News)

Is this NYC’s oldest manhole cover? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

* Seinfeld voice* What’s the deal with all these late-night fireworks? (David Cruz for Gothamist)

8 restaurant reopenings to be excited about this week. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Thank you to reader Shiloh for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 15, 2019 – The “Why Do Tourists Love the M&M Store?” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA will pay $250 million to get $200 million back, the next great pastrami sandwich, Hart Island will become a park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s planned subway disruptions are non-existent on the numbered lines, but hits the E, R, L, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The MTA is considering a restructuring “transformation plan” that will end up firing thousands of administrative jobs in an effort to save money, but will still end up with a $426 million deficit in 2023. (amNewYork)

While the MTA fires thousands, they’ll be making way for 500 police officers. The cops will cost $250 million and are theoretically partially financed by the $200 million they will be saving through anti-fare evasion efforts, or to put it another way over 18 million subway rides. What a deal! We only have to spend $250 million to get back $200 million. (Streetsblog)

This is the real question. Why do tourists love the M&M store so much? (/r/AskNYC)

How can you make ordering lunch worse? Ask Sweetgreen, whose “3.0” location manages to lower the bar even further while you pay $15 for a salad. (Eater)

The story that started with the most questionable Halloween decorations has a surprise ending of honest conversation. (NY Times)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency Plan, which will protect the Lower East Side from the rising ocean and storms like Superstorm Sandy passed City Council, but there is already a lawsuit planned to try to stop the phased construction along the 2.4 miles of shore. Leading the charge is Arthur Schwartz, the same lawyer who tried to sue the 14th St busway out of existence. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball signed a deal with Nike that would have shut out multiple businesses surrounding Yankee stadium from selling Yankees gear, effectively killing them completely, but after an rallying effort from the Yankees’ front office, places like Stan the Man’s will be included in the MLB deal. (amNewYork)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite for early AIDS patients, stillborn children, the disenfranchised, the unknown, and Veterans that dates back to the Civil War, will be transferred from the Department of Corrections to the Parks Department. As part of the bill passed by the City Council, the Department of Transportation will be charged with creating transportation to the 101-acre island. (Curbed)

In response to the candy and churro-related arrests happening in the subways, the mayor asked the MTA to consider designated “vending areas” in subway stations. Could it be that de Blasio’s never-ending feud with Governor Cuomo actually spurs the mayor to stand up for the people of the city? (Politico)

The mayor has asked some 18,000 city employees, 15,000 of them FDNY, to be a part of the new Outreach NYC program. The program will report unsheltered homeless people in an attempt to connect them with voluntary outreach programs. (amNewYork)

An 85-foot mural by Keith Haring that once adorned the halls of Grace House, a youth organization in the Upper West Side, sold for $3.9 million. The church who owned the land sold the building and removed the mural in worry that it could have been destroyed in renovations. (NY Times)

Facebook is moving into 1.5 million square feet of office in Hudson Yards next year. While this isn’t mentioned in the article, I assume that means that Apple won the bidding war for space in the Farley Building inside the post office on 34th. (amNewYork)

Via is now offering $15 rideshares from LaGuardia to Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn and $20 rides to Staten Island and the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Our airports are the most expensive in the country, from the flights to parking to coffee. (Patch)

Why not add ice skating to that list? The TWA Hotel will be installing an ice skating rink at JFK airport. (amNewYork)

Photos: A first look inside the Waldorf Astoria’s historic conversion. (6sqft)

Attorney General Letitia James is suing B&H Photo for failing to pay $7.3 million of taxes when offering instant rebates. When offering an instant rebate, the law says you are taxed on the pre-rebate price, but B&H had been collecting taxes on the post-discounted price. (amNewYork)

A teenager was arrested and charged with three counts each of hate crime assault, aggravated harassment, and harassment for throwing eggs as a synagogue and Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers. (Gothamist)

Comings and goings from Broadway: Going is Tootsie, coming is Woman in Black, KPOP, and cuts to West Side Story. (amNewYork)

Scooter and Pete are two adorable new Red Panda fur babies making their at the Prospect Park Zoo. There are photos and video. (Gothamist)

What’s going on with chicken parm and horny singles? (Eater)

There’s a deadly drug-resistant fungus called Candida auris. More than 800 cases have been reported in the country and half of them have been in New York. A list of hospitals, long-care nursing homes, and hospice units that have been exposed is available. (amNewYork)

The mayor held a town hall and you can be sure that for any criticism levied against him or his administration, he had someone else to blame and in a few occasions it was the audience. (Gothamist)

The NYPD arrested and charged Michael Hall with attempted murder, two counts of arson, one count of criminal possession of a dangerous weapon, two counts of attempted assault, one count of menacing and harassment in connection to a series of fires at the NYCHA complex, the Louis Pink Houses, that occurred over a span of six months. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s next great pastrami sandwich is from Hometown Bar-B-Que in Industry City. (Eater)

The 16 most exciting Caesar Salads in the city. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for September 26, 2019 – The “Nightmare NIMBY Neighborhood” Edition

The MTA’s $51.4 billion Captial Plan was approved, white New Yorkers are twice as likely to smoke marijuana, Facebook eyes the post office, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Working Families Party is accusing Governor Cuomo of creating a conspiracy to destroy them for daring to run Cynthia Nixon against him in his last primary. (NY Times)

Andrew Cuomo and his longtime girlfriend Sandra Lee have the world’s largest display of LEGO art” with classics like Michaelangelo’s David, Degas’s Whistler’s Mother, Munch’s The Scream and Van Gogh’s Starry Night interpreted in LEGO starting this weekend at the New York Hall of Science. (Time Out)

Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez and New York State Attorney General Letitia James sued ICE over the arrests that have taken place outside of the city’s courthouses. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Screaming, propaganda, shoving, conspiracy theories about the Department of Transportation, and accusations of taking money from pedophiles, just another day in the NIMBY-nightmare neighborhood of Park Slope. (Streetsblog)

A peek inside Michael Cera’s new $2.4 million Bed-Stuy home. (Mansion Global)

93% of people arrested for marijuana possession in NYC are black and Latino, but white New Yorkers are twice as likely to have smoked marijuana than anyone else. (Patch)

Operation DUMBO Drop 2019 is a go. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

We are a month away from early voting in this year’s elections, so it’s time to start educating yourself about the five ballot questions. (Gotham Gazette)

The $51.4 billion MTA Capital Plan for 2020 – 2024 was unanimously approved by the MTA’s board and has the support of Mayor de Blasio, with a few strings attached. The city is expected to pay $3 billion towards the plan, but during the current 2015-2019 plan the city was expected to pay $2.66 billion, but only paid $790 million. (Streetsblog)

Facebook is eyeing 740,000 square feet of office space at the the midtown post office. (6sqft)

Photos: Inside a 19th-century paint factory, before it becomes luxury loft apartments. (Untapped Cities)

A gold coffin at the Metropolitan Museum of Art will be taken back to Egypt after the realization that it had been stolen. (Patch)

If you were at Paul Simon’s last show in Queens, I have some news for you. He’ll be part of Live From Here with Chris Thile on October 26. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: Inside Long Island City’s new public library. (6sqft)

City schools were all set to have a one day work week this year on December 23, but logic has prevailed and students and teachers will get that day off as well, extending winter break from December 21 through January 2. (Patch)

If you’re a big fan of waiting in long lines to get food, Chinese rice noodle roll and congee restaurant Yin Ji Chang Fen has opened an outpost on Bayard St. (Gothamist)

If you define corruption as an illegal act that benefits an individual without punishment because of their office or position, the Brooklyn Borough President’s office is corrupt for their agreement with the Parks Department that allows officials to park wherever they feel in the park that surrounds Borough Hall without consequence. (The City)

Mapping the development boom transforming Crown Heights. (Curbed)

Hart Island’s been in the news a lot lately, today’s update is that there is a concern that it is running out of space as the city’s public burial grounds. Since the Civil War, over a million people have been buried there and in eight to ten years the city needs to find a new place to bury its dead. (6sqft)

As expected, the vape flavor ban is being challenged in court. (amNY)

The city’s grand plans to update and future-proof the Gowanus Canal cleanup have been killed by the EPA. (6sqft)

Enjoy 10 hours in Gowanus (but not in the Gowanus) with this guide. (Brooklyn Based)

It is a misdemeanor under the city’s Right of Way law to fail to yield to pedestrians or cyclists while making a turn after a state appeals court upheld the law as constitutional. (Gothamist)

Where to get drinks in the theater district. (amNY)