The Briefly for February 18, 2020 – The “Decapitating a Luxury Condo” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city tries to control the private garbage industry, the best happy hours in 31 neighborhoods, Staten Island makes an untrusted cop list, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 49˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

In appreciation of mosaic subway station signs. (Ephemeral New York)

Photos: A tour of NYC’s oldest library, once used by George Washington. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Off with its head, literally. The Department of Buildings is being ordered to revoke the permits for an indeterminate amount of floors from a luxury condo on the Upper West Side. Amazingly, the developer will have to demolish potentially 20 floors of the 55-story building. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The NYPD has always insisted that it’s facial recognition database is only checked against mugshots, but there is some evidence that points to photos from social media being used to assist in creating matches for suspects. This wouldn’t be the first time the NYPD lied about their facial recognition database. (Mike Hayes for HuffPost)

Prosecutors in Staten Island are building an internal list of NYPD officers who they will not allow to testify in court because they can’t be trusted to testify honestly. Seems like if they an’t be trusted to tell the truth in court, there might be issues trusting them to honestly uphold the law? (George Joseph for Gothamist)

It started with a white picket fence and quickly escalated to racial discrimination in Flushing. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

It took 125 years, but the lions outside the NYPL are finally reading thanks to some very large books. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Newkirk Plaza is America’s oldest outdoor shopping plaza, and it seems no one wants to be responsible for it. The city and MTA have discussed who is responsible for management, funding and safety without a conclusion, mirroring most disagreements between the state and city. If neither step up, maybe the growing rat population will start cleaning the place up. (Katie Herchenroeder for Bklyner)

New ethics violations charges have been filed against Andy King, who finished the punishment for his last ethics violation charges less than three months ago. This time around it’s disorderly induct and conflict-of-interest violations by using public funds for personal benefit. This happened while a court-appointed monitor was watching over King’s actions. The city council voted to not expel King 34-12 back in October. Maybe they’ll change their tune this time. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

If you’ve ever been walking through the city late at night, you’ve watched private garbage trucks blow through red lights without slowing down or drive the wrong way on one way streets. Between 2016 and 1018 privately owned garbage trucks were involved in 73 series accidents. A new law is looking to control the private garbage industry over the next three years, which picks up half of the city’s garbage. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

After half a century, a legendary pool hall in Bay Ridge, Hall of Fame Billiards, is closing. (Kimon de Green for Bedford + Bowery)

Here are the four people running for City Councilmember Rafael Espinal’s seat after he abruptly quit his job representing Cypress Hills, Bushwick, East New York, and Brownsville. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum continues to unravel after the forced resignation of director Caroline Baumann, with five trustees resigning in protest. (Robin Pogrebin for NY Times)

LGBTQ groups have once again been rejected from participating in the Staten Island St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 1. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

What’s the difference between co-ops and condos and what the heck is a condop? (Localize.City)

Reminder: If you see a hawk, don’t go close to it. It’s likely hunting and you’re ruining its potential meal. (Laura Goggin)

A ban on brokers fees will benefit tenants in the long run to the tune of $7,000 on average in the first year, and that includes a rent hike. (Beth Dedman for amNewYork Metro)

The best happy hours in 31 neighborhoods. (Rachel Pelz for Thrillist)

The Briefly for January 30, 2020 – The “So Many Non-Coronavirus Ways to Die” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Krispy Kreme is coming back to NYC, impeachment cakes, the NYPD wrote more moving violation tickets to cyclists than truck drivers in 2019, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 38˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

12 contenders for a NYC subway mascot. (Ben Yakas with illustrations by Matt Lubchansky for Gothamist)

The Lunar New Year Chinese Temple Bazaar in Queens was canceled over coronavirus fears, despite New York having no confirmed cases. (Joseph Goldstein and Jeffrey E. Singer for NY Times)

Worried about Coronavirus? Don’t be. The flu killed 5,000 Americans in the first two weeks of the year. (Buzzfeed)

If you live in NYC, you can request a Department of Transportation bike corral by filling out a form, even for a residential building. (@jeffnovich)

The NYPD issued more moving violations to bicyclists than truck drivers in 2019. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

In reaction to the Clearview AI mess with the NYPD, State Senator Brad Hoylman proposed legislation that would outright ban on biometric technology use by police on a city level, a bill is being pushed that would require the NYPD to disclose every surveillance tool it employs. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The city collectively passed a ballot measure to expand the power the Civilian Complaint Review Board has to oversee the NYPD. In response, the NYPD is suing the city to prevent the change from happening. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Harlem neighborhood that Langston Hughes praised in 1944 is still one of the ‘best-kept secrets in New York.’ But it’s not quite as affordable as it once was. (Aileen Jacobson for NY Times)

According to Mayor Bloomberg, New York City “isn’t trying to be the lowest-priced product in the market.” Now the city is full of empty luxury apartments, because oligarchs don’t have the same kind of money that they used to. (Cory Doctorow for Boing Boing)

Krispy Kreme is coming to Times Square with a 24 hour 45,000-square-foot store and it’s bringing five more NYC locations with it. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

What happened with Fairway in Red Hook? According to their landlord private-equity ruined the store. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

15 places to find vaulted Gustavino tiles in the city. (Shirley Mgozi Nwangwa for Untapped New York)

Should New York public schools teach climate change? Wait, climate change isn’t taught in New York schools? (Scott Enman for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Hey, did you buy a lottery ticket and not check it? Two Take 5 tickets were sold and they’re each $29,249 winners. Go check your pockets. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Alamo Drafthouse in lower Manhattan was supposed to open in 2018, then it was supposed to open in 2019, now it’s been postponed until summer of this year. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

It’s been ten years since it was declared a superfund site, but the long-awaited cleanup of the Gowanus Canal officially has a start date, and it’s in September. (Devin Gannon or 6sqft)

The city paid Childrens Community Services half a billion dollars to provide homeless services since 2017, but there’s only one problem. It appears that the nonprofit doesn’t exist. (Nikita Stewart for NY Times)

Someone’s been spotted stealing the Spotted Pig’s pig. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The website for The Villager, one of the media brands inside the Schnepps empire, has been eaten by amNewYork Metro. The Villager was already the home for The Villager, Chelsea Now, Downtown Express, and Manhattan Express. Consolidate, consolidate, consolidate. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Brooklyn bakery Butter & Scotch sent 53 sheet cakes to Washington with various messages to encourage Republican senators to allow John Bolton to testify int he impeachment trial of Donald Trump. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Dozens of Rise and Resist members grouped themselves at Grand Central during the peak of rush hours, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. on Monday night, for a vocal demonstration, sparked by the impeachment proceedings on speed and lack of witnesses. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

Brooklyn may seem like a liberal’s paradise, but politics within the borough’s Democratic party is becoming less transparent as leaders voted to hold fewer meetings and restrict member-driven resolutions. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The famous hot chocolate from City Bakery is getting a second life with founder Maury Rubin’s The Wonderbon Chocolate Co. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The team behind Brooklyn Bazaar is bringing a new restaurant within McCarren Park inside the restored bathroom building. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The most beautiful interiors in New York City, mapped. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Nothing says “punk rock” like a limited edition pair of Doc Martens with the CBGB logo stamped on them. (BrooklynVegan)

After the Knicks shit the bed (again) on Wednesday night, the entire Garden broke out in a “sell the team” chant aimed at team owner James Dolan. The Knicks are 13-36 and have had a using record 16 if the last 19 seasons. (Dan Bernstein for The Sporting News)

Video: A look at People and Animals Living Safely (PALS), a non-profit that provides a safe space for human and animal victims of domestic abuse. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has big plans for 2020, which include work on making nine subway stations ADA compliant, spending a billion dollars on signal upgrades for the A, C, and E lines, improving the 7 and F tunnels, station improvements along the J and Z lines, and working on extending the Q train to 125th St. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Shaun Donovan, a former secretary of Housing and Urban Development in the Obama administration, is planning to run for mayor of New York. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

The City Council is imagining the future of Rikers Island, with an emphasis on creating renewable energy and a waste water treatment plant is a possibility. (Gloria Palzmino for NY1)

There are 1,400 buildings whose facades have been determined to have major structural problems and are a serious threat to pedestrians, hundreds with no protections for pedestrians. Those buildings have racked up $31 million in unpaid fines from the city. (Matthew Maah for NY Times)

39 holiday happy hour deals in NYC. (Eater)

The Briefly for January 29, 2020 – The “Peanut Butter Subway Bandit, I Hate You” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A dog is rescued from the FDR, the best restaurants in the West Village, the city’s oldest espresso machine, why recycling doesn’t work in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 26˚ High: 41˚
Clear throughout the day.

An interview with New York’s first ever Director of Cannabis Programs, Norman Birenbaum. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

In 2020 government agencies are competing for your attention on Twitter, and you know what that means: memes. How do you do fellow kids? (Luke Winkie for NY Times)

The amazing rescue of Daiki, a Shiba Inu who got loose on the FDR. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Do the N95 respirator masks people are wearing around the city work against the Coronavirus? The CDC says they’re unnecessary and they’re backordered almost everywhere, but they are the respirators that are recommended for medical workers who are exposed to the virus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

There are many reasons to avoid taking the subways, but Health Commissioner Dr. Oxiris Barbot says there’s no reason to avoid them due to Coronavirus fears. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Nightmare: A reason to avoid the subways. Whoever smeared peanut butter all over a subway pole this morning on the A train, I hate you. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Seven reasons recycling isn’t working in New York City. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Captain America is from the Lower East Side, or maybe he’s from Brooklyn? It depends if you read the comics or watch the movies. The people behind the Captain America statue in Brooklyn believe Steve Rogers is “just a kid from Brooklyn.” (Anne Ewbank for Atlas Obscura)

New York City’s best hotels for design lovers. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Central Park belongs to the coyotes now. Keep your distance. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Photos: Celebrating the Lunar New Year in Sunset Park. (Paul Frangipane for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

15 restaurants to help get you through the winter. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

A new public schools initiative reduced absenteeism improved graduation rates by bringing social services to campuses across New York City, according to a new study from the Rand Corporation. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Tributes to artist Jason Polan have been posted since his death, highlighting Polan’s love of humanity, his founding of the Taco Bell Drawing Club, and warm heart. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

A tribute to the street art of the East Village. (Dawson Knick for GVSHP)

Light-up seesaws were installed in Midtown three weeks ago. This week, The New York Times is on it. (Aaron Readle for NY Times)

Whoops. Chipotle was fined $1.3 million for 13,253 child-labor violations across dozens of locations in the state. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

The new City Winery location on Pier 57 is set to open later this year and the first show have been announced with Colin Hay, Sinead O’Connor, Vaness Carlton, Har Mar Superstar, and The Maintain Goats. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A search for the best pork bun in Flushing’s Chinatown. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

The city has chosen an NYC Ferry location for Staten Island, next door to the Staten Island Ferry that connects to lower Manhattan. The launch date for the ferry to connect to Midtown West should be announced by the summer. (NY1)

Amazon is expending its 855,000 square foot distribution center in West Shore, Staten Island, signing a lease on an adjacent 450,000 square foot warehouse. The new warehouse should be up and running by the summer. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

A searchable database of the thousands of Catholic clergy who have been “credibly accused” of sexual abuse across the country was published Tuesday and includes hundreds of members of the dioceses and religious orders in the New York City area. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

There are three types of driver’s licenses. Standard, READ ID, and enhanced. Things are going start getting confusing on October 1, when you can’t board a flight with a standard license. Here’s what you need to know about the difference between the three types and how to get a REAL ID or an enhanced license. (Lauren Paley for StreetEasy)

Op-ed: New Yorkers didn’t flinch when the NYPD was revealed to have a DNA database of juveniles or were performing dangerous body scans on pregnant women, but the controversy surrounding facial recognition company Clearview was enough for people to take notice. Albert Fox Cahn and Lindsay Greyerbiehl make the case why more NYPD oversight is necessary. (Albert Fox Cahn and Lindsay Greyerbiehl from Surveillance Technology Oversight Project for The Independent)

It took Mayor de Blasio five years to let his feelings be known about Daniel Pantleo, whose choke hold lead to the death of Eric Garner, but NYPD officer Michael Valva, who is accused of beating his autistic son and leaving him to freeze to death in his car, he’s already commented that “this is someone who should burn in hell.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The NYPD’s Joseph Stokes and Jose Aracena are accused of stealing cash during an “integrity test” held by the department. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Photos: Meet the dogs and cats of the American Kennel Club’s Meet the Breeds event. (Keilin Huang for Untapped New York)

Cafe Reggio has the city’s oldest espresso machine. It’s so old (how old is it?) that it originally ran on coal. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Department of Transportation announced the location of 10 miles of new protected bike lanes in Brooklyn, where 17 of last year’s 29 cyclists were killed by drivers last year. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

13 simple ways to make your apartment more green. (Lidia Ryan for 6sqft)

The 22 beset West Village restaurants to try. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)