The Briefly for June 6, 2019 – The “We Can’t Stop The Ratpocalypse or Rising Sea Levels” Edition

The MTA discrimination disability lawsuit can move forward, ThriveNYC is failing the city’s schools, Uber will helicopter you between Manhattan and JFK, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Uber is offering helicopter rides between lower Manhattan and JFK Airport. Uber Copter kicks off on July 9 and will be available during afternoon commutes. (NY Times)

The Department of Housing Preservation and Development is pushing a new program that would name a “Tenant of Record,” which would end succession rights, which allows relatives to take over their homes after the primary resident dies or moves out. (Patch)

We are headed for a ratpocalypse. Is climate change to blame? (Grist)

Before steam, NYC homes were heated with coal. If you look carefully on some sidewalks you can still find “coal holes,” which allowed for easy delivery. (Ephemeral New York)

After 20 years and two locations, Park Slope’s gay bar Excelsior will close on July 31. This is the second closure due to rising rents. (Brooklyn Paper)

A sealed arrest record is supposed to reduce the unjust and disproportionately burdensome effect of those records on minorities. The NYPD has decided to have its own interpretation of the law. (Gothamist)

Congrats to this year’s Excellence in Design winners, which “reflect the very best of design in public works, housing, and libraries, parks, and public art.” (Curbed)

Notice something new floating around the city this week? The Sing for Hope pianos are back, celebrating their 500th piano. You’ve got until June 23 to find a piano in the city before they are donated to schools, healthcare facilities, and community centers. (Untapped Cities)

The NYPD is withholding its lists of which officers work at which precincts, claiming stating who is working where would endanger public safety. A lawsuit from the Legal Aid Society will decide if that reasoning is valid. (Patch)

A Midtown fender bender is not news, but it is when one of the cars is driven by Tracy Morgan and it’s a new $2 million Bugatti. (Gothamist)

It seems former prosecutor in the Central Park Five case Linda Fairstein doesn’t know about the Streisand Effect. The woman who coerced confessions from children about a crime they didn’t commit took to the internet to defend her honor after being forced to resign from Vassar’s board of trustees from a student body that did not want her there because of her involvement in the case. (The Root)

Where to eat something quick if you’re running late to a Broadway show. (The Infatuation)

How long would you stay in a rent-stabilized apartment if you could? Ed Higgins has been renting an apartment on Ludlow St for 43 years. His rent in 1976 was $100 a month and now it’s still under $600. (6sqft)

Polly Trottenberg, a voice of sanity on the MTA’s board, is resigning effective immediately upon being replaced. She was a de Blasio nomination in 2014 and has been highly critical of Governor Cuomo’s initiatives in the past. She did not state a reason for her resignation. (Politico)

What’s going on with the F train this week? A dead baby shark (do do do do do do) was found on an F train platform in Manhattan. (Gothamist)

The city’s Fair Fares program has 50,000 participants, and a big help was the expansion of the program in April. The program will expand in 2020 to any New Yorker living under the poverty line. (Curbed)

The de Blasio administration has begun seizing ice cream trucks from owners who are accused of evading nearly $4.5 million in fines. It seems that shell corporations aren’t just for our presidents anymore, because 76 ice cream trucks changed hands between shell corporations to avoid paying traffic and parking tickets. The city has seized 46 trucks so far. (Patch)

It seems the one thing the city’s politicians can agree on is the new entrance designs for Penn Station. (Downtown Express)

ThriveNYC provides no tangible support for the city’s students and councilmember Mark Treyger is calling for a “significant investment” in social and emotional services for students. There are over one million students in the city’s public schools and only 1,335 social workers, 2,958 guidance counselors and 560 school psychologists supporting those students. There are more safety agents than all those combined. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A paid witness used by the defense of Daniel Pantaleo, the officer accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal chokehold, claimed Garner’s death could not have been caused by the hold. He was not present when it occurred and his appearance in court was paid by the defense. (amNY)

Over 100,000,000 have seen The Lion King on Broadway with over 9,000 performances, which are two staggering numbers. (CBS New York)

Councilman Antonio Reynoso announced he is running for Brooklyn Borough President once Eric Adams’ term limits have run out in 2021. (Brooklyn Paper)

After months of presentations and public feedback, the MTA announced a draft plan to improve the Bronx’s buses by improving speeds, reliability and streamlining routes that haven’t changed in decades. (Curbed)

The lawsuit against the MTA that would force the construction of elevators whenever a station is closed for improvements was given the go-ahead in the state’s supreme court, stating the MTA is not about the city’s Human Rights Law’s prohibition of discrimination based on disability. (amNY)

15 stellar spots for raw bar. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 31, 2019 – The “Amazon Threatens to Walk” Edition

Mayor de Blasio won’t stop talking about his fired staffer, the Winterfest saga continues, the unwilling public advocate candidate and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Winterfest organizer Lena Romanova used a pseudonym to harass vendors and the press. Complaints against Winterfest are being reviewed by the Brooklyn District Attorney’s office. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Brooklyn Assemblywoman Latrice Walker is a candidate for Public Advocate, even if she doesn’t want to be. (Gothamist)

Amazon plans to sponsor computer science classes in more than 130 of the city’s high schools. (TechCrunch)

Amazon executives have expressed frustration in private at their treatment in New York and made veiled threats of walking from their Long Island City plans during a three hour city council meeting. Maybe some computer classes weren’t enough to win over the long list of groups who are against HQ2. (NY Times)

Reminder: Google is building a $1 billion campus with no bargained tax breaks from the city or state. (NY Mag)

A ranked list of the city’s best matzoh ball soups. (Grub Street)

Watch a snowstorm kick the city’s ass for 30 minutes in this 29 second time-lapse. (@mattmfm)

The MoMA PS1 Skyspace is closed while the 5 Pointz construction obstructs a view of the sky that’s supposed to be completely unimpeded. (Curbed)

Take a look at the photo of the guy reviewing the place and ask yourself “Does this man look like he would enjoy himself a Taco Bell that serves booze?” (NY Post’s uptight Steve Cuozzo)

The city released a draft of Gowanus’ rezoning. Just try not to think about the decades old toilet that’s currently running through the neighborhood. (6sqft)

Watch the Queens president Melinda Katz’ State of the Borough 2019 address. (Melinda Katz)

A very small number of the 30,000 New Yorkers eligible for half priced MetroCards have signed up for the Fair Fares program. (Gothamist)

The city’s high school dropout rate hit a record low in 2018. (Chalkbeat)

How to watch next week’s the public advocate debate. (amNY)

“We’re not happy with the service. And we do owe the public an apology” MTA president Pat Foye. Pat Foye wins this week’s “no shit” award. (NY Post)

Mayor de Blasio can’t stop digging himself deeper when it come to his former aide fired after sexual harassment accusations. Now he’s blaming the governor of Montana. (NY Post)

16 date night restaurants in the East Village. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 7, 2018 – The “Surviving A Fall Onto the Subway Tracks” Edition

Fair Fares launches with little fanfare, Albany’s been pocketing hundreds of millions of cell phone taxes, Amazon’s charm offensive starts, Oreo squirrel, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The No Pants Subway Ride is this weekend, plan accordingly. (Gothamist)

That L train un-shutdown? It still needs the MTA board’s approval. (amNY)

Forget eggroll squirrel, here comes Oreo Squirrel! (West Side Rag)

He fell onto the subway tracks and SURVIVED! An unidentified man fell onto the track and laid underneath the train as it went over him. He was taken to the hospital as a precaution, but he walked away uninjured. (NY Post)

Brooklyn’s first medical marijuana dispensary opened across from the Barclays Center. Only qualifying patients for now. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Kindergarten impossible. How did this 5-year-old boy escape his school and get on a subway platform without being noticed? (Gothamist)

I Eat from UWS Dumpsters and So Should You” Not me, that’s the headline. (West Side Rag)

The holidays are over, we’ve landed back in full-steam-ahead early January, you know what time it is? Girl Scout cookies. If you don’t have a Girl Scout in your life, here’s how to score some Tagalongs. (amNY)

NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill continues to think of new reasons to worry about marijuana legalization. Last week it was the retirement of marijuana-sniffing dogs, this week the excuses are underage use (which did not go up in Colorado after weed became legal) and grow house explosions. (NY Post)

The history of NYC style pizza in under eight minutes. (DidYouKnowFood)

The 168th and 181st 1 train stations in Washington Heights will be closing for nearly a year, here’s how to get around during the closure. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio launched the Fair Fares program, as you’d expect from our mayor, with too little information for too little people and late. (Politico)

A portion of Northern Boulevard around 114th Streets collapsed into a construction site on Friday and it is indefinitely closed between 111th and 114th and indefinitely. There were no injuries and no utility disruptions. (Jackson Heights Post)

Apartment owners in the Citylights co-op in Long Island City are protesting the scheduled end of their 20-year real estate tax abatement. Since 1997, the co-op has been paying a discounted tax rate on apartments that originally sold between $10k and $65, which are now worth close to 16x their original value. (LIC Post)

Two firehouses in Queens were closed due to a scabies outbreak. Scabies is… gross and let’s not discuss that it’s caused by bugs that crawl under your skin and lay eggs. (NY Post)

Brooklyn lawyer Rashaun Kelley was arrested in connection to a series of sexual assaults which date back to 2014. He faces sex abuse, burglary and attempted rape charges. (CBS New York)

“Happy New Year from your future neighbors at Amazon.” Amazon has started their charm offensive. (Amazon)

A profile of Figure Skating in Harlem, where young women of color train to compete in a spot dominated by whites. (NY Times)

The First Street Garden Art Park has a new mural to match one of Congress’ new faces: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (@lexibellaart)

RIP to one of NYC’s centenarians, “Big Helen” Sieczkowski, who passed away on January 2nd at 100 years young. (Bklyner)

Unsurprisingly, New York was not on the list of cities where you can buy a home with an annual salary of $60k or less. (The Real Deal)

The head of the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission will step down with no successor announced by City Hall. After the sixth suicide by a cab driver in the last 13 months, there have been calls for Meera Joshi to step down from drivers and politicians. (Crain’s New York)

Albany “diverted” hundreds of millions of dollars over the last ten years meant for emergency communication services, according to the FCC. NY uses the money for “non-public safety or unspecified uses.” The governor’s office refutes that claim. (NY Post)

The Bronx Riviera is planning a roaring comeback with a $75 million renovation of the landmarked Orchard Beach pavilion. The project is still in the planning phase, a date has not been set for completion. (amNY)

Our mayor, the cartoon character. (NY Times)

The city spent $4.1 million over three years to give deer vasectomies in Staten Island in hopes of reducing the number of road accidents, but 2018’s 103 accidents with 17 injuries marked an all-time high. (NY Post)

If you don’t know Paul Manship’s name, you’ve seen his work. His sculptures inhabit Central Park like the “Group of Bears” or the gates to the Children’s Zoo, but Prometeus, which looks over the skating rink at Rockefeller Center, is likely his best known work in the city. (Ephemeral New York)

A map of every bagel shop in New York City. (Brooklyn Bagel Blog)

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