The Briefly for May 7, 2020 – The “Playing Governor Cuomo BINGO” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Nets go back on their promise to pay arena workers, the NY presidential primary is back on, a $20 million UES mansion, and more

Today – Low: 49˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

There are 64 potential cases of children in New York with a mysterious inflammatory disease associated with COVID-19. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

Photos: The first night of the subway lockdown. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

“Being a bus driver at 1 a.m., you’re already on edge.” With overnight subway service suspended, bus operators are concerned more unruly passengers will be coming their way. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Let’s play Governor Cuomo press briefing BINGO. (Jen Carlson and Sarah Butler for Gothamist)

The New York Democratic presidential primary is back on for June 23, thanks to a ruling by US District Judge Analisa Torres. The ruling is in response to Andrew Yang’s lawsuit. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

John Bonizio, the owner of Metro Optics in the Bronx, has continued to pay all 56 of his employees through the closure of all their stores. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Despite a promise to pay its workers while the NBA is on indefinite hold, but at least 15 workers have not been paid. Joe Tsai, the owner of the Nets, is worth $10.6 billion. (Andy Hirschfeld for Observer)

There are people who will never ride the Cyclone because they will say it’s not safe, so it’s hard to imagine what Coney Island could do to make people feel safe and still open this season, but they’re getting ready with the hopes they’re allowed to celebrate July 4th with the city. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

While the coronavirus has drastically changed many components of American life, the age-old issue of racial disparities in law enforcement has once again come to the fore, thanks to the NYPD. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

10 great seafood dishes still available in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The mayor has been shit-talking the federal government all week but spent Wednesday saying that without a stimulus for the city, city workers will face furloughs and layoffs. The mayor would not get into specifics, ensuring the highest amount of stress possible for all city workers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

In an attempt to widen the state’s Covid-19 testing, there is some unsubstantiated reporting that 3,000 grocery stores will become testing locations. Get some blood testing done while you pick up some more yeast. (Emmo Orlow for Time Out)

“It was a cascade. And, by the way, I fully endorse it. But, literally, our income went to zero.” Inside the ‘Mrs. Doubtfire’ broadway show as it went from night three of previews to indefinite hiatus. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

It’s been chilly after last weekend’s great weather. Where to order something when you’re in the mood for a bowl of something warm. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance Jr. dropped charges in a major construction fraud case this week. But he’s not blaming allegations of prosecutorial misconduct — he’s blaming Covid-19. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Can a fast food restaurant be considered a NYC treasure? The answer is yes if you’re talking about Roll N Roaster, which has reached legendary status amongst New Yorkers. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

As the months tick by, we’re going to see more places go from closed indefinitely to closed permanently. The latest to be added to the permanent list is Daddy-O in the West Village. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

A soup kitchen run by the Coalition for the Homeless is seeing a 50% spike in demand since Covid-19 broke out. (Jacqueline Baylon and Claire Molloy for Business Insider)

“I’ve loved producing MUG for the past 28 years, but with things being the way they are, I’m closing MUG today, with a heavy heart for the city I love.” Manhattan User’s Guide, an invaluable resource run by Charlie Suisman has ended its 28-year run. Charlie has a new novel out called Arnold Falls. (Manhattan User’s Guide)

Today marks the next set of streets to close to vehicles and open to pedestrians and cyclists. How many miles of open streets will be added today? Two, bringing the total mileage to 9. The city has a goal of 100 miles by the end of the month. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Apartment Porn: A $20 million mansion on the Upper East Side with multiple fireplaces, a roof deck with a hot tub, a garden, a Juliet balcony, a circular skylight, and just steps from Central Park. If $20 million is too much, you can rent it for $85,000/month. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

It turns out that storing dead bodies in a UHaul truck on Utica Avenue isn’t a crime, it’s disgusting, but not a crime. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

12 affordable NYC dining options for takeout and delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

thanks to reader Madeline for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 28, 2020 – The “I Got About Five Friends Left” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The forever feuds between governors and mayors, who gave money to what candidate in your zip code, the best cocktails under $10, and more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 41˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 26˚ High: 43˚

What was the point of making the NYPD to wear body cameras if the Civilian Complaint Review Board, the very people who are supposed to have oversight of the NYPD, have to request the footage form the NYPD? (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are a lot of things that contributed to the Lower East Side gaining near-mythical status. Each story isn’t enough to turn a set of streets into a phenomenon on its own, but when combined into one tightly-packed neighborhood, it almost seems impossible that it was ever real at all two decades later. One of those places was Rainbow Shoe Repair, a cobbler’s shop that became the place to be photographed. Now some of those photographs have become an exhibition that will be touring the Lower East Side, including some displayed outside the Abrons Arts Center. (Untapped New York with photos by Daniel Terna)

Why is it that Chipotle is always front and center when it comes to labor law violations by fast food companies? (Grant Lancaster for amNewYork Metro)

Are New York governors and city mayors destined to feud forever? Governor Pataki, in his new books, says Mayor Giuliani asked him to cancel the 2001 mayoral elections so he would be able to stay in office longer after the 9/11 attacks. Giuliani denied the claim, but forgot to hangup the phone and said “I got about five friends left.” I’d feel bad for him if he wasn’t such a ghoul. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

If you want one last taste of receiving plastic bags when shopping in NY, make a point to do your shopping on Saturday. Sunday starts the plastic bag ban. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Are you one of the 9% of New Yorkers that would give up sex if you never had to deal with parking a car in the city? (Beth Dedman for amNewYork Metro)

This is a true Trump to City: Drop Dead moment. The Trump administration stopped a feasibility study, looking at how New York and New Jersey could be protected from future weather events like Superstorm Sandy. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

A driver killed a seven-year-old boy in East New York, making it the second child killed by the driver of a vehicle in three days in the neighborhood. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The Chinatown building that housed the Museum of Chinese in America archives and was destroyed by a five-alarm fire in January will be demolished and rebuilt. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

In 2018 the city enacted a program where you could get paid 25% of a fine to report idling cars and trucks, which would be a payout ranging from a $75 to $500. There was the billboard campaign featuring cartoon birds reminding everyone to stop idling their cars. Clearly that didn’t work, because the city is back with a new campaign featuring Billy Idol entitles “Billy Never Idles.” Despite the campaign, filing a complaint through the city’s 311 app is not possible. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The “I Wanna Quit the Gym” bill passed the state senate and i headed to the assembly. Pretty soon you’ll be able to cancel that NYSC membership that accidentally renewed because you forgot about it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

No one has tested positive for coronavirus in the city or state, but that hasn’t stopped the growing anxiety of knowing it’ll be on our doorstep sooner or later. The city and state say they are prepared with plans for hospitals, schools, mass transit, businesses and mass gatherings along with supplies at the ready and $40 million in funding to fight the virus. (Joseph Goldstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The NYPL is about to debut their first-ever permanent exhibition entitled “Treasures,” with items from the archives like a copy of the Declaration of Independence in Thomas Jefferson’s handwriting, original Mozart and Beethoven sheet music, Sumerian tables, and more. “Treasures” will open in November. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Department of Transportation rejected an idea to move the Queens Blvd bike lane to the road’s median, but that didn’t stopp the mayor from publicly asking “what’s the harm in considering this idea that the DOT already said was a bad idea?” (Garsh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

This weekend starts the first #Never Bloomberg march at his townhouse on the Upper East Side, protesting his police surveillance of Muslims, stop and frisk, the homelessness spike under his watch, and the list goes on and on. The march is being lead by multiple groups, including the Working Families Party, who never endorsed Bloomberg for mayor in 2001, 2005, or 2009. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Congrats, Brooklyn. You’ve officially made it, being named TripAdvisor’s #5 trending destination in the United States. (Irina Groushevaia for BKLYNER)

The Brooklyn Public Library and the Brooklyn Historical Society have announced a new plan to merge. Jennifer Schuessler for NY Times)

As if having to go to New Jersey wasn’t enough of a punishment, a broken signal added insult to insult on Thursday’s evening rush hour commute, causing hour-long delays that began at 5:30. Sounds lovely. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Mayor Bloomberg took credit for getting gay marriage passed in New York, Governor Cuomo remember a different version of that story. (Zack Fink for NY1)

Video: A slide show on New York in the 1910s. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A week-long staycation in NYC. (Pardon Me For Asking)

Here are all the ways you pay taxes when you buy a home in the city. (Localize.Labs)

Who does New York support for president, financially? (RentHop)

The best cocktails for $10 and under. (Julien Levy for Thrillist)

The Briefly for June 19, 2018 – Juneteenth, NYPD vs NYPD PBA on School Cameras, “Spit In It,” and More

The Every School Speed Camera Act has the support of the NYPD’s commissioner, but not the NYPD’s Police Benevolent Association.

What a View

NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill supports the Every School Speed Camera Act, citing Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero initiative as reducing pedestrian fatalities by 45% between 2013 and 2017. O’Neill stands at odds with the NYPD’s Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, who claims that instead of the 150 additional schools to get cameras, 5,000 more police officers can fix the speeding concerns. State Senator Simcha Felder (of course he’s involved) claims to have privacy concerns about the speeding cameras. Streetsblog makes the case that when the Every School Speed Camera Act lapses in a few weeks, that Governor Cuomo can be blamed.

Over 1,000 lives were lost aboard the PS General Slocum, New York City’s worst maritime disaster, in 1904. 6sqft looks back on the disaster over 110 years ago.

Yayoi Kusama’s “Narcissus Garden” will be installed at the form Fort Tilden army base at the Rockaways starting July 1. The installation consists of 1,500 mirrored stainless steel one-foot balls. Kusama’s piece is a protest against the commercialization of art and culture, but expect a million selfies this summer.

RIP the midtown Carl’s Jr. Stay out of our city.

Curbed has a map of where you can find areas with air conditioning throughout the city. This will be handy as we slowly forget what winter is like.

6sqft looks at the a href=”https://www.6sqft.com/the-1936-summer-of-pools-when-robert-moses-and-the-wpa-cooled-off-nyc/”>importance of public pools throughout the city in 1936.

A study commissioned by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo recommends that “a regulated, legal marijuana program be available to adults in the state.” The governor said “facts have changed,” which is weird way of saying “we were wrong.”

Would you like some “PLEASE SPIT IN IT TOO” on your burger?

Filming Around Town: The Kitchen, starring Melissa McCarthy his on 47th and 5th, John Wick 3 is at Coffey St and Ferris St in Brooklyn, The Deuce is at 1st Ave 2nd St and 7th and 30th, Ray Donovan is at Lehman College in the Bronx.

Today is Juneteenth, which marks the 153rd anniversary of the abolition of slavery in the United States. Local organizers are planning a protest in Foley Square to push for the end of the wealth- and race-based discrimination in the criminal justice system.

You’ve got until 2023 until the MetroCard as you know it will be OBSOLETE!

Cynthia Nixon unveiled her campaign finance reform platform in the same location that Gov Cuomo announced his candidacy for Governor eight years ago. “If Washington is a swamp, then Albany under Andrew Cuomo is a cesspool.” -Nixon

Xiu Qing You, 39, was living in the United States for nearly twenty years before being arrested by ICE agents while interviewing for a green card.

The Brearley School on the Upper East Side announced all applicants who consider themselves female can apply to the school, which opens the door for transgender students.

The 80 Flatbush development is displacing the HIV-AIDS Services Administration, which is currently at 94 Flatbush, at the end of the month. It is one of three facilities in Brooklyn and will be moving to a temporary location on Third Avenue until it finds a permanent home in Bushwick. For the people who rely on these services, an unannounced change in schedule could have serious consequences.

More toxic algae in a city park. Bowne Park in Flushing is the latest park to issue a warning about algae blooms. These aren’t lethal like the Prospect Park Lake, Morningside Pond, or The Lake in Central Park, but you could still be staying away from the water.

Have you ever had an egg cream?