The Briefly for December 5, 2019 – The “Fight of the Year: Duck vs Subway Car” Edition

In today’s daily NYC news digest: Uber’s top tourist destination, Parks takes over the city’s mass grave island, the Mets have a new owner, the best latkes in the city, and more.

The latest restaurant openings with potential. (The Infatuation)

Hart Island, the country’s largest taxpayer-funded mass-grave site, is now under the control of the Department of Parks instead of the Department of Corrections. New York City has been burying its veterans, its poor, its anonymous, and those infected in the early days of the AIDS crisis for over a century. The Department of Parks is tasked with providing access to the public for visitation of the million bodies buried on the 131 acre island. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Anthony Benedetto’s art is on display at the Art Students League. Maybe you know him as Tony Bennett. (Untapped New York)

In the fight of duck vs subway car, ducks win. A duck wandered on its way onto the tracks of the N train in Brooklyn, causing the train line to come to a complete stop while this terrible little scamp was removed. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The 10 neighborhoods to watch in real estate in 2020, with no real surprises. Williamsburg wouldn’t have made the cut if the L train had been shutdown, but it’s sitting at #1 instead. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Say hello to seven recipients of the 11th Annual Sloan Awards for Excellence in Teaching Science and Mathematics in New York City Public High Schools. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Photos: The tree lighting ceremony at Rockefeller Center. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

11-year-old Charlotte Nebres is making history as the first Black dancer cast in the leading role of Marie in the New York City Ballet’s production of “George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker.” (Kimberley Richards for HuffPost)

The best latkes in the city. (Leah Koenig for Grub Street)

After months of negotiation and multiple threats of a transit strike, the MTA and Transport Workers Union Local 100 have reached an agreement. The details won’t be publicly available until after the contract is ratified by TWU 100 members. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Take a look inside Christina Hendricks’s apartment on W 56th. The 800 square foot apartment is on the market after her divorce to Geoffrey Arend. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

The Mets have a new majority owner in billionaire Steve Cohen, who increased his investment by $2.6 billion. Cohen became a minority owner in 2008 after former majority owners the Wilpons were caught up in the Bernie Madoff scandal. Unfortunately for the Mets the Wilpons will stay on as CEO and COO for the next five years. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Watch videos from the final performance at Brooklyn Bazaar. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The best vegetarian restaurants on the Upper West Side. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

What to see, eat and drink near Brooklyn’s new Wegmans. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Despite its designation as a “public place” since 1974, architects and developers showed a plan to build nearly one thousand apartments on a 5.8 acre site on the corner of Smith St and Fifth St in Gowanus. Brad Lander, who has been excessively bullish on rezoning Gowanus and adding over 8,000 apartments to the small neighborhood, pushed the development at a Community Board meeting on Monday. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The story of the Taxi King, his rise to power and crash back to earth. (Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

One thing that won’t be returning to Lincoln Center after its half-billion dollar renovation is Richard Lippold’s 190-foot-long, 39-foot-high sculpture Orpheus and Apollo. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The top destination in the city for Uber trips by tourists in the city is as obvious as it gets: The Empire State Building. It was actually the #1 destination on the planet. The most popular place in the entire state was the Queens Center Mall in Elmhurst. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

Applications for middle and high school are due Friday, December 6. Here’s what you need to know. (Amy Zimmer and Christina Veiga for ChalkBeat)

The tragedy of the red horse hopper, told in three photos. (EV Grieve)

Why the census has always been controversial in New York City. (Diana Buds for Curbed)

The trailer for the fourth season of High Maintenance was released this week, with the show returning in early February. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Everyone could use a story with a happy ending. When Ashley Patrick left her purse with her wallet, headphones and a pair of gloves for her son on the Q train, she assumed they’d never find their way home. Let’s call this one a holiday miracle. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

NYC’s 11 most festive bars and restaurants. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

The Briefly for November 1, 2019 – The “You Can’t Stop the Christmas Juggernaut” Edition

The weekend subway disruptions, everything about the 2019 NYC Marathon, MLB and Nike are screwing the Bronx, photos from Halloween, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend the clocks turn back an hour. Make sure to remember that on Sunday when looking at all your non-internet connected devices.

Getting around this weekend will continue to be tricky with the 3, 4, 6, 7, D, E, F, N, and R all with diversions. Maybe it’s best to follow the lead of the marathon and run where you need to go. Check the subways before you go. (Subway Weekender)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 NYC marathon. (Time Out)

Use this custom marathon subway map to find your way around the city on Sunday. (6sqft)

10 fun things to look for along the NYC Marathon route. (Untapped New York)

The best places to watch the marathon. (NY Times)

The corpse of Halloween isn’t even cool yet and the Winter Village at Bryant Park is officially open. (Time Out)

12 new public art installations to see in November. (Untapped New York)

Photos: The Village Halloween parade. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: West 69th St is a nice block that is very into Halloween. (Gothamist)

These political pumpkins spell out a simple message in the Village. (The Villager)

The story of how a sewing machine repair shop in the garment district run by a man with a penchant for collecting has become a trove of forgotten treasures and how he fights back the tourists that have no idea what his shop does. (NY Times)

There aren’t enough apartments in NYC. While that statement seems like the ramblings of a lunatic, it’s true according to “The Geography of Jobs” report, which shows that the city needs more housing to keep up with its explosive job growth. As a result, housing stock is increasing in Connecticut and New Jersey and more people are commuting. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball and Nike are working together to screw the Bronx. After city taxpayers paid $1.2 billion for Yankee Stadium, MLB and Nike cut a deal that only allows officially licensed MLB merchandise to be sold at “premium distribution points” near a stadium, which would freeze out nearly every business near Yankee Stadium from selling anything MLB-related. The Yankees’ COO has been working with MLB to resolve the issue, but as it stands right now eight businesses may find themselves up River Ave without a paddle. (amNewYork)

publicly said “something doesn’t fit” when it comes to Epstein’s death, stoking the interest of a million YouTube conspiracy theorists. (Politico)

It only took the mayor a day to roll back the heavily supported news that sidewalks on Fifth Ave would be expanded to make way for holiday window onlookers, saying that he hadn’t signed off on the idea yet. (amNewYork)

RIP Barneys. Sold for $270 million in bankruptcy court. (The Real Deal)

This is not how you play Untitled Goose Game. It is, however, how you capture a goose named Calista in Central Park with lead toxicity. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The city’s foie gras ban is, of course, going to be challenged in court. (Grub Street)

Say hello to New York, and the world’s, richest billionaires. (Patch)

Cultural Affairs Commissioner Tom Finkelpearl is leaving his job with coincidental timing after the Mother Frances Cabrini statue embarrassment. (Patch)

New data shows the NYPD rarely ever does anything with the honesty findings from the Civilian Complaint Review Board. 61 False Official Statement findings, which determine that an officer lied to investigators, were submitted and only five were substantiated. Another good reason to vote yes on question 2 in this year’s election. You can vote early through Sunday. (Gothamist)

Is a Wegmans a Wegmans without a Sub Shop? No serious, I don’t know the answer because I’m not someone who is insane for Wegmans. (Grub Street)

Take the stairs. More than 1,000 New York City elevators still need new inspections after faulty contractors gave them sub-par checks. (Patch)

The Times, always a few steps behind, has descended down the story of the Joker stairs between Shakespeare and Jerome Avenues. (NY Times)

10 raw bar picks. (Grub Street)

thanks to reader Mary for today’s fetured image!

The Briefly for October 11, 2019 – The “A Questionable Subject for a Broadway Musical” Weekend Edition

The weekend’s subway closures, what’s closed on Columbus Day, Tad’s Steaks is closing, the West Side Highway is slowing down, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Briefly will be taking Columbus day off this year. See you on Tuesday morning!

This weekend’s subway disruptions are on the 2, 5, A, D, E, F, J, N, Q, R, and W trains. (Subway Weekender)

A look around the city for what will be closed on Columbus Day. (Patch)

A Michael Jackson musical is headed to Broadway next summer. Yikes. (NY Times)

The tree-killing beetle that was infesting the city’s forests for two decades has finally been beaten, according to the Parks Department, who hasn’t seen the bug in the city since 2010. (Patch)

Gem Spa, its egg creams, and the constant fight for survival were put on the Atlas Obscura map. (Atlas Obscura)

The City Council voted to prohibit Rikers Island from housing any incarcerated individuals past 2026, giving the city very little wiggle room when it comes to closing the jail. Nothing like a deadline to keep you motivated. (Gothamist)

There are groups and elected officials in the city that are pointing out that if the city’s jail population can be reduced from 7,000 (where it is today) down to about 3,000 we can shut down Rikers Island without a need to build any community jails. (Jackson Heights Post)

Keith Haring’s “Crack Is Wack” mural is back in the appropriately named Crack is Wack Playground on E 129st St and Second Ave. (Gothamist)

Summer is barely over and here comes winter. The rink at Rockefeller Center opens this weekend. (amNY)

The 10 best apple and pumpkin picking spots near NYC. (6sqft)

In an attempt to lower the number of fatalities along the West Side Highway, the city will lower the speed limit from 35 to 30. There have been ten people killed by drivers on the West Side Highway since 2013. (Curbed)

The city’s last Tad’s Steaks, on Seventh Ave near Times Square, will close in January. (Gothamist)

Peter Luger launched online reservations to alleviate the stress of being one of the 6,000 daily phone calls they get to attempt to get a table. They aren’t fully joining the 21st century, as they still cash only. (amNY)

16 and 17-year-old are no longer supposed to be automatically prosecuted as adults, but Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Staten Island’s courts have been seemingly unable to follow the law. (The City)

There is no easy way to check liquor licenses and a new law seeks to change that. The governor signed a bill into law that will create a public database of information for on-premises liquor licenses. (Bowery Boogie)

Finding a new apartment sucks, but now it quantifiably sucks. (StreetEasy)

How Uber and Lyft cheat drivers out of minimum wage, explained. (The Indypendent)

The 19 best beer bars in the city. (Eater)