The Briefly for August 9, 2019 – The “Our Punching Bag Mayor” Edition

The weekend subway delays, the mayor’s potential ethics violations, the city’s new restaurants, David Chang reacts to Stephen Ross’ Trump fundraiser and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subway disruptions hit seven different subway lines. If you’re planning on getting wherever you’re going via the subway, double-check. (Subway Weekender)

Looking for a beach read for the weekend? This piece in the Times about how Bill de Blasio went from a progressive hopeful to Democratic a laughing stock and punching bag is a good read. (NY Times Magazine)

It’s so common for businesses that close “for renovations” to never reopen that places like Boilermaker in the East Village are changing their signs to explicitly state they’ll be reopening. (EV Grieve)

During the trials for the members of the SPLC designated hate group The Proud Boys for their part in starting fights following a talk from founder Gavin McInnes in Manhattan, the members of the Proud Boys claim that it was the Antifa members that posed a threat and they were simply defending themselves. (NY Times)

8 places to staycation and vacation this summer. (amNY)

When the city put a freeze on the number of cars it allowed for ride-hailing apps, drivers claimed it was unfair because of the price of leasing one of the licensed cars. Now the Taxi & Limousine Commission is investigating those leases. (Patch)

Is this the best egg salad sandwich in New York City? Gothamist believes they’ve found it at Bibble and Sip. (Gothamist)

Michael Collopy was hit and killed by a cyclist on the corner of 23rd and 6th earlier this week, the second pedestrian to be killed by a cyclist in 2019. 23rd and 6th is particularly dangerous, a cyclist was killed at the intersection in June and there have been multiple crashes in the last five years there. (Gothamist)

Stephen Ross, president of the company that owns Equinox, Blink Fitness, SoulCycle, and PURE Yoga and an investor in multiple popular restaurants is hosting a $100k/plate fundraiser for the president’s re-election campaign, “strongly disagrees” with the president, but it’s not stopping him from hosting the fundraiser anyway. (Gothamist)

Stephen Ross was “the only potential investor” in David Chang’s Momofuku. Chang asked Ross to cancel the fundraiser on his podcast but didn’t mention if he actually asked Ross to cancel the fundraiser personally or if he decided that mentioning it on his podcast would absolve him of the situation. (Eater)

Chang isn’t the only chef doing damage control after his connection to Stephen Ross became public. Christina Tosi of Milk took investment from Ross and José Andrés opened multiple restaurants in the Hudson Yards, where Ross is his landlord. Both have issued statements to publicly distance themselves from Ross, but have not made a statement about what they intend to do moving forward. (Grub Street)

BAM commissioned Leo Villareal, Teresita Fernández and Hank Willis Thomas to create public art for its Fort Greene campus, to be completed in the next two years. (6sqft)

Photos from inside the Paley Center’s Marvelous Mrs. Maisel exhibit. (Untapped Cities)

Don’t be alarmed, but a venomous snake may have gotten loose from the Bronx Zoo and no one knows where it is. Not as much fun as the loose cobra from a few years ago, some signs have been posted to keep your eyes open for a “nervous” black and yellow mangrove snake. (Gothamist)

Okay, let’s talk about the summer of White Claw. (Grub Street)

If you’re the kind of person who loves awful experiences, you can watch this 41-minute 43-second interview between Sean Hannity and Bill de Blasio. (Gothamist)

Each generation of commerce ruins the previous generation’s pillars and tenets and the slow and public death of the Sex and the City-type shopping experiences are no different. Even in this piece in the Times which bemoans when shopping “felt like art,” Ginia Bellafante admits that the stores she looks back on fondly are the same stores that signaled “the beginning of SoHo’s end.” (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio has taken his local ethics-violating campaign financing to his failing presidential bid, or as Susan Lerner of Common Cause New York describes him, “a walking ethical disaster.” (Gothamist)

The MTA’s fare hikes won’t help address financial woes, due to the fare hikes outpacing increases in income for poorer New Yorkers. If fares continue to go up, but not wages, mass transit becomes less of an option for the people who need it most. (Patch)

Even hawks need some privacy while destroying a pigeon on the sidewalk. (Gothamist)

Traffic at LaGuardia was so bad last night that the nearby highways and internal roads were full of people abandoning their rides in buses, cabs, and cars to walk in an attempt to catch their flights. (Gothamist)

New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza is popular with parents amid calls for his firing, a new survey shows. Carranza has been accused of sowing racial division due to his push for racial integration of the city’s school. (Patch)

19 new restaurants in NYC. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 6, 2019 – The “Absolutely Unbelievable Story of A French Bulldog” Edition

The Union Square Tech Hub broke ground, the most rat-infested neighborhoods, a vigil turns into a mass shooting, a beaver in the Hudson, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Union Square Tech Hub, formerly the PC Richard & Son near Union Square, broke ground on Monday to cheers for new jobs and jeers that Union Square may soon resemble midtown. (amNY)

25,000 bees were removed from the Staten Island Ferry terminal in St. George. The NYPD’s beekeeping unit relocated the hive. If you come across thousands of bees, don’t spray them with anything and don’t call 311, call 911. (NY Times)

Meet Winston, a French bulldog who accidentally jumped off a six-story window, smashed through the sunroof of a car below and LIVED! Winston is staying at the vet for observation but has no broken bones. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio says Bernie Sanders would have won the 2016 election, does this embracing of Bernie mean the mayor is ready to stop spending his weekends in Iowa? (Politico)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard hit a milestone 10,000 jobs for the first time in half a century. While it may never see it’s World War II peak of 70,000 jobs, they are expecting to see 20,000 by 2021. (amNY)

Driverless cars have arrived in NYC, but they’re only inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard as shuttles, operating in a one-mile loop to and from the ferry terminal for free. (NY Times)

Which neighborhoods are the coolest in the city? Brooklyn Heights, Prospect Heights, and the Upper West Side. Strictly speaking, in those neighborhoods, tree cover provides the most shade and absorbs the most heat, making them the “coolest.” (Curbed)

The best Greek restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

De Blasio steps in it again. The city purchased a cluster of buildings in April for $173 million, which appraisals showed a value between $50 million and $143 million. De Blasio owns two houses in the city and the mortgages on those homes come from the brother of one of the people who sold the city the overpriced buildings. Par for the course for our failing presidential candidate of a mayor. (Curbed)

The Dogspot “pet harbors” aka “dog jails” pilot program in Brooklyn passed City Council. These are the little locking windowed air-conditioned jail cells for dogs to sit in while you go into a store. It’s a step up from leaving your dog tied up and unattended like your best furry friend is a bike. (Bushwick Daily)

Meeting, James Turrell’s skyspace installation at MoMA PS1 is open after having its unobstructed view of the sky marred by construction at the buildings where 5Pointz was in Long Island City. (Gothamist)

For those of the spooky persuasion, Halloween is less than 100 days away. For those inside the haunted house industry, it’s already time to get to work. Take a look inside the construction of the Bane Haunted House in Chelsea. (amNY)

Eight crypts and catacombs in the city, some spooky, some scary, some tourist attractions. (Untapped Cities)

What do Prospect Heights and Central Harlem South have in common? They’re the two neighborhoods with the most rats per square mile in the city. (Patch)

How cold do you want your ice cream? How about “liquid nitrogen cold?” Four Winters, a new ice cream shop in Queens, is using liquid nitrogen to create “instant ice cream.” (NY Times)

It’s a midtown sidewalk showdown between a business improvement district and food cart owners. Food cart owners are accusing midtown developers are accusing the BID of intentionally putting flower planters and bike racks where their carts usually stand in an attempt to get rid of them. (amNY)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite where over one million New Yorkers have been buried since the Civil War, operated by the Department of Corrections and inmates are paid $1 per hour to bury bodies, is finally getting a post-Hurricane Sandy restoration. Erosion has caused the shoreline to disappear and as a result, human remains were exposed. (Curbed)

Add this to your list of travel nightmare scenarios. A woman was locked underneath a Peter Pan coach bus with the luggage on a bus bound for Boston. The police arrested the Peter Pan employee that allegedly locked her in. (amNY)

Part of the deal that allowed the Atlantic Yards to be developed was that 2,250 affordable apartments would be built by 2025. At the current rate of construction, developer Greenland Forest City Partners looks like it’ll be missing that deadline. (The City)

A beaver was spotted in the Hudson River, hanging out and doing beaver things. It’s been a while since the city’s seen wild beavers, but the beaver is the official state animal and the city was pretty much founded on the fur trade, but this little guy is safe from that. (Gothamist)

The lawsuit preventing 14th St from becoming a busway has already cost commuters an additional year’s worth of delays. (amNY)

A vigil in Crown Heights became a public mass shooting when four of the people holding the vigil were shot early Monday morning. All the victims are in stable condition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Agrilus 9895 is a new species of beetle discovered in Green-Wood Cemetery and is a relative of a species of beetle in Europe but unique to Brooklyn. (Atlas Obscura)

Where do food industry pros go when their shifts are over? A list of late-night locations. (amNY)

The Briefly for July 29, 2019 – The “Are Inflatable Rats An Endangered Species?” Edition

Crown Heights looks for an upzoning compromise, how much you need to afford a two-bedroom apartment, Gil the guide dog learns the subways, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Clumsy, overcooked and pointless.” Moulin Rouge on Broadway isn’t winning over critics. (amNY)

Inside the Department of Sanitation’s Certified Organic Recycling (CORe), which probably smells just lovely, where they are turning the city’s food scraps into methane that will be used to heat homes and run in natural gas lines. (Bushwick Daily)

A fifth NYPD officer since June has committed suicide. Commissioner James O’Neill declared a mental health crisis in June in an attempt to fight the stigma of seeking help. (NY Times)

Don’t leave your unwanted pets in the city’s parks, they don’t have the survival instincts necessary to stay alive. A rabbit was rescued from Prospect Park. Larry the bunny is in a foster home in Bergen Beach. (Patch)

Is the inflatable protest rat an endangered species? (Gothamist)

Amazon continues to make headlines whenever the company looks at office space. After abandoning the Long Island City HQ2 idea and One Court Square’s million feet of office space, they’ve continually looked for a smaller space for their current NYC employees. The latest location is the old Lord & Taylor building on Fifth Ave, which is currently owned by WeWork. (Curbed)

Has street flooding during rainstorms always been this bad? The city’s construction boom is contributing to the floods. (Gothamist)

An attempt to answer the question “why is the city so loud?” (Viewing NYC)

How much should you be earning to afford a two-bedroom apartment in the city? According to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, it’s $162,857, but when was the last time you knew anyone to only spend 30% of their income on rent? (6sqft)

Advocates in Gowanus are proposing the idea of an Environmental Special District to prevent any new construction due to a possible rezoning to prevent adding more wastewater that would end up in the canal, potentially spoiling the ongoing Superfund work. (Curbed)

The latest location for a flower flash was one of the city’s last phone booths on the Upper West Side, which was the subject of the children’s book The Lonely Phone Booth. Blink and you’ll miss it because flower flashes sometimes last only a few hours. (Gothamist)

Another week, another entry into the 100+ point health inspection violation club. Among the restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health is Jorge’s in Ridgewood with 124 points. (Patch)

Find every Privately Owned Public Space in the city with this map. (Viewing NYC)

After 20 years, Park Slope rents will finally drive gay bar Excelsior out of business for good. (Bklyner)

The city is suing American Airlines for violating its paid sick leave laws, passed in 2014. (Gothamist)

Come for the photos of Gil, an eight-month-old Labrador retriever, stay for the story of a guide dog learning how to navigate the subways. (amNY)

City Council Members Jimmy Van Bramer and Daniel Dromm celebrated the New York Public Library’s new $564 million budget with Drag Queen Story Hour, which will receive $25,000. (Jackson Heights Post)

A dispensary grows in Brooklyn. (6sqft)

Crown Heights is experiencing something rarely seen in the city: an attempt at a compromise between two competing plans when it comes to the future upzoning of the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Which is worse: Rodents or roaches? (Splinter)

A shooting during a Saturday night block party in Brownsville resulted in 11 wounded and one dead. (Huff Post)

A body was discovered in the waters under the Verrazzano Bridge on Sunday afternoon. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Rising rents may be an issue, but the next retail crisis will come from rising property taxes, which are up 71.6% since 2009. (Patch)

Raising a child in NYC costs more than sending that same child to a four-year state college. (Patch)

The millions of dollars the city has wasted on paying for roof work which should have been free in NYCHA buildings would have been better spending lit on fire to replace the failed heating systems. The spending on roofs still under their warrantees was discovered by City Comptroller Scott Stringer. (NY Times)

Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney is requesting the mayor have a Canyon of Heroes parade for the survivors and first responders of 9/11. The mayor called it a “great idea.” (Patch)

Sometimes you just want to look at photos of baby animals, and that’s okay. Here are some newborn owls and ospreys born in the city. (Gothamist)

In response to the backlash over some police officers having water thrown on them, the political right (and the president) are demanding respect for the NYPD. Josmar Trujillo asks “Have they earned it?” (Gothamist)

The five best ice cream sandwiches in the city. (Thrillist)

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