The Briefly for July 3, 2019 – The “Pick A Side: Iced Coffee vs Cold Brew” Edition

Everything you need for July 4, the drink of the summer, new school gender inclusion guidelines, lying roaches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s the deal with the subways and buses on July 4. (6sqft)

Expect massive crowds and tight security if you’re checking out the fireworks over the east river. (Patch)

Safety tips for pet owners on July 4. (amNY)

Each year’s Fourth of July fireworks display in the city starts in the California desert, in 11 underground bunkers in high-security facilities. (NY Times)

What’s open and what’s closed on July 4. (Patch)

The New York Times is never why when it comes to controversy, and they jumped in head-first with this one. Is cold brew better than iced coffee? (NY Times)

Checking in with Tom’s Restaurant on the Upper West Side 30 years after Seinfeld‘s pilot aired. (Gothamist)

The top 10 secrets of Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. (Untapped Cities)

Despite every last inch of Manhattan having been developed, there is still wildlife. With the year half over, coyote sightings in Central Park are at quadruple the level they were for all of 2018. If you encounter one, leave it alone and report it. (I Love the Upper West Side)

While conservatives around the country are mounting challenges to Roe v Wade, New York City has become more accommodating to those seeking an abortion. Charities helping women afford abortions are seeing a higher percentage of those women come from outside the city. The city even set aside a quarter of a million dollars in support for the New York Abortion Access Fund to assist people from outside the city be able to afford an abortion. (Gothamist)

The okapi diorama at the Museum of Natural History is considered to be one of the world’s most impressive taxidermy dioramas. Here’s the story behind the diorama and even the one riddle/practical joke that can be found if you look close enough. (Atlas Obscura)

NYC Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza issued new gender inclusion guidelines to better support the city’s 1.1 million students. The guide touches on sports, name and gender changes, dress codes, and more. While they are still only guidelines, they are being praised by advocacy groups as a good start. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Don’t be alarmed, but we’ve hit “the cockroaches are flying” time of year. (Gothamist)

Right now the city’s homeless shelters turn away people with pets, which becomes a real problem for the 10-25% of people experiencing homelessness who have pets. More than 98% of animals surrendered to the city’s Animal Care Centers in the last six months are due to their owners’ homelessness. Two bills making their way towards the city council could change that. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s restaurants have begun to embrace the latest food trend: chickpeas. (amNY)

Sometimes it’s better not to ask. Like, “What is that black, smelly liquid pouring out of the elevator at Grand Central?” Maybe that’s information we should never know. “Why was it gushing out and why did it smell like sewage?” These are more questions that should not be asked because you probably don’t want to know the answer. (Gothamist)

On any given day you can find multiple photos of NYPD vehicles using the city’s bike lanes like personal parking garages, which makes the mayor’s declaration that the NYPD is going to start taking drivers in the city’s bike lanes laughable. (Streetsblog)

Apologies to our mayor, who had his time in Iowa interrupted to discuss the three bicyclist deaths in the city in the last week. A “crisis,” but not enough of a crisis to deal with it within the confines of the city that he’s supposed to be in charge of. The mayor was short on details, aside from increased NYPD enforcement of pre-existing laws. (Gothamist)

The crackdown is not permanent, but a three-week targeted enforcement. (Streetsblog)

Fact-checking the president’s claims that New York’s taxes are driving people away. (NY Times)

Our president is a serial liar, so no one should be surprised that despite his claims that he’s never had an alcoholic drink that he regularly drank in New York City, according to a new book by Allen Salkin. (Vice)

The first section of a state park honoring the first African-American woman elected to Congress, Shirley Chisholm, is open in Brooklyn. (Curbed)

The city is speckled with the history of the revolutionary war if you know where to look. (amNY)

Remember the city’s styrofoam ban? It’s in effect and the first fines have been issued. (Gothamist)

Central Park’s Belvedere Castle is open after a 15-month renovation. (Time Out)

The drink of the summer: The Gin and Tonic Plus (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for April 9, 2019 – The “Ignoring the Most Serious Health Violations” Edition

The NYPD demands an exemption to congestion pricing, wildlife BINGO, a chubby cat needs a home, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Want to play NYC wildlife BINGO? (Gothamist)

14 places to view cherry blossoms trees. (Untapped Cities)

73% of the most serious restaurant health violations go unchecked. Just cook your own food from here on out. (Eater)

The NYPD is demanding they should be exempt from congestion pricing. Not the cop cars, their personal cars. (Streetsblog)

Watch this NYPD officer run a red light on an illegal dirt bike without a helmet in front of a bunch of other cops cheering him on and crash, hitting the pavement HARD while trying to avoid getting hit by traffic. (@_scottjohnson)

Some of the most reckless NYPD drivers in the city are in Canarsie. (Streetsblog)

Take a look at the Tokyo neighborhood that inspired Hudson Yards. (6sqft)

The 9/11 Memorial Glade section of the 9/11 Memorial, dedicated to people with 9/11-related illnesses, will open at the end of May. (Curbed)

The estranged husband of the Staten Island teacher found dead and burnt inside a storage unit last week was formally accused of killing her along with his girlfriend. (Gothamist)

Is it time to finally look into extending the 4 train past the Utica Ave station? $5 million was allocated to a study in 2015 and the MTA just got around to getting it started. (Curbed)

Trying to discover the best burger in NYC. (Food Insider)

The five best picnic spots in the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez is open to the decriminalization of prostitution and would be open to a law that would legalize sex work. This is the same man who decriminalized marijuana in Brooklyn. (Gay City News)

Save this photo of old Penn Station from 1910 just in case you ever have to step foot in the dilapidated toilet that sits underneath Madison Square Garden. (Viewing NYC)

The mayor’s plan to turnaround schools with the Renewal program had a statistically insignificant effect on the targeted schools, but it was great at spending money. $773 million to be precise. The mayor said the results would be “fast and intense.” Half of the schools closed. (Chalkbeat)

Were #1! #1 in Lyme disease infections. (Patch)

This chubby cat needs a home. All 41 pounds of him. (Gothamist)

RIP Bob Slade, the creator and legendary radio host of the call-in program “Open Line.” (NY Times)

The mystery of why “1922 HYATT” was found on a nearly century-old subway wall has been solved. (amNY)

The street corner in Brooklyn where impaling pumpkins is de rigueur. (Atlas Obscura)

Add it to the list of deadly New York nightmares. A construction worker died on Monday morning after a piece of the building he was working on broke off and struck him on the head. (Gothamist)

The city ordered yeshivas to bar students who have not received the measles vaccine. (NY Post)

The reason electric bikes and scooters aren’t legal in New York? Blame Manhattan. (Streetsblog)

Here’s where to BYOB. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for January 7, 2018 – The “Surviving A Fall Onto the Subway Tracks” Edition

Fair Fares launches with little fanfare, Albany’s been pocketing hundreds of millions of cell phone taxes, Amazon’s charm offensive starts, Oreo squirrel, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The No Pants Subway Ride is this weekend, plan accordingly. (Gothamist)

That L train un-shutdown? It still needs the MTA board’s approval. (amNY)

Forget eggroll squirrel, here comes Oreo Squirrel! (West Side Rag)

He fell onto the subway tracks and SURVIVED! An unidentified man fell onto the track and laid underneath the train as it went over him. He was taken to the hospital as a precaution, but he walked away uninjured. (NY Post)

Brooklyn’s first medical marijuana dispensary opened across from the Barclays Center. Only qualifying patients for now. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Kindergarten impossible. How did this 5-year-old boy escape his school and get on a subway platform without being noticed? (Gothamist)

I Eat from UWS Dumpsters and So Should You” Not me, that’s the headline. (West Side Rag)

The holidays are over, we’ve landed back in full-steam-ahead early January, you know what time it is? Girl Scout cookies. If you don’t have a Girl Scout in your life, here’s how to score some Tagalongs. (amNY)

NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill continues to think of new reasons to worry about marijuana legalization. Last week it was the retirement of marijuana-sniffing dogs, this week the excuses are underage use (which did not go up in Colorado after weed became legal) and grow house explosions. (NY Post)

The history of NYC style pizza in under eight minutes. (DidYouKnowFood)

The 168th and 181st 1 train stations in Washington Heights will be closing for nearly a year, here’s how to get around during the closure. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio launched the Fair Fares program, as you’d expect from our mayor, with too little information for too little people and late. (Politico)

A portion of Northern Boulevard around 114th Streets collapsed into a construction site on Friday and it is indefinitely closed between 111th and 114th and indefinitely. There were no injuries and no utility disruptions. (Jackson Heights Post)

Apartment owners in the Citylights co-op in Long Island City are protesting the scheduled end of their 20-year real estate tax abatement. Since 1997, the co-op has been paying a discounted tax rate on apartments that originally sold between $10k and $65, which are now worth close to 16x their original value. (LIC Post)

Two firehouses in Queens were closed due to a scabies outbreak. Scabies is… gross and let’s not discuss that it’s caused by bugs that crawl under your skin and lay eggs. (NY Post)

Brooklyn lawyer Rashaun Kelley was arrested in connection to a series of sexual assaults which date back to 2014. He faces sex abuse, burglary and attempted rape charges. (CBS New York)

“Happy New Year from your future neighbors at Amazon.” Amazon has started their charm offensive. (Amazon)

A profile of Figure Skating in Harlem, where young women of color train to compete in a spot dominated by whites. (NY Times)

The First Street Garden Art Park has a new mural to match one of Congress’ new faces: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (@lexibellaart)

RIP to one of NYC’s centenarians, “Big Helen” Sieczkowski, who passed away on January 2nd at 100 years young. (Bklyner)

Unsurprisingly, New York was not on the list of cities where you can buy a home with an annual salary of $60k or less. (The Real Deal)

The head of the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission will step down with no successor announced by City Hall. After the sixth suicide by a cab driver in the last 13 months, there have been calls for Meera Joshi to step down from drivers and politicians. (Crain’s New York)

Albany “diverted” hundreds of millions of dollars over the last ten years meant for emergency communication services, according to the FCC. NY uses the money for “non-public safety or unspecified uses.” The governor’s office refutes that claim. (NY Post)

The Bronx Riviera is planning a roaring comeback with a $75 million renovation of the landmarked Orchard Beach pavilion. The project is still in the planning phase, a date has not been set for completion. (amNY)

Our mayor, the cartoon character. (NY Times)

The city spent $4.1 million over three years to give deer vasectomies in Staten Island in hopes of reducing the number of road accidents, but 2018’s 103 accidents with 17 injuries marked an all-time high. (NY Post)

If you don’t know Paul Manship’s name, you’ve seen his work. His sculptures inhabit Central Park like the “Group of Bears” or the gates to the Children’s Zoo, but Prometeus, which looks over the skating rink at Rockefeller Center, is likely his best known work in the city. (Ephemeral New York)

A map of every bagel shop in New York City. (Brooklyn Bagel Blog)

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