The Briefly for October 11-12, 2020 – The “SERENITY NOW!” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The Raccoon Show, Dermot Shea calls BLM protesters “spoiled brats”, cuffing season declared, the top 12 neighborhood pizza slices, and more

Today – Low: 55˚ High: 68˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.

Midtown’s Roosevelt Hotel is closing at the end of the month after 96 years. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

There is a law in NYC that local police cannot enforce federal immigration law, that does not stop ICE agents from pretending to be local police during raids. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

When the city lacks its usual entertainment, it turns to the trash pandas. Welcome to The Raccoon Show. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Spider-Man 3 has begun filming in Queens. Look for the filming notices for “SERENITY NOW.” Yes, all of the fake filming titles for Spider-Man movies have been George Costanza references. (Jacob Kaye for amNewYork Metro)

Inside a Bronx freshman’s first day back in the classroom. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Maybe after this is all over, we should stop putting schools in windowless basements. (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

The city owes its public school teachers $900 million, which dates back a decade and has its roots in the Bloomberg administration’s dealing of the last financial crisis. The city tried to punt on those payments until an arbitrator ruled the city must pay its teachers half of what is owed by the end of the month, the other half in July 2021 and agree to a no-layoffs provision through June 2021 along with teachers getting a 3.5% pay bump by May 2021. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A new state requirement will demand that 20% of all students and staff enrolled in in-person learning be tested weekly for Covid-19 inside the state’s “yellow” zones with the mandate in effect by Friday, October 16. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Farewell to Queens Comfort on 30th Ave in Astoria. Today is its last day of service. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Broadway will remain shut down through May 2021, extending past the last “end date” in March. (Broadway World)

Satire: Hundreds Of Cane-Wielding Demonstrators Pull Governor Into Kickline To Protest Broadway Shutdown. (The Onion)

Broadway is known as “The Great White Way” thanks to the volume of lights on the various marquees, but the nickname remains appropriate for other reasons too, as a new report shows that only 20% of shows on Broadway or Off-Broadway during the 2017-2018 season were created by people of color, two-thirds were filled by white actors and 94% directors were white. (Sahar Bahr for NY Times)

Had enough of apartment living in NYC and yearn for a life on the seas but still in the city? Here’s everything you need to know about houseboat living in NYC. (Cait Etherington for 6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio has chosen the city’s next rezoning battleground: SoHo and NoHo, from Astor Place down to Canal Street. The opponents say it will “ruin” the neighborhood’s character and the proponents argue that it will bring 3,200 apartments to the area, with 800 below-market rate. The deciding City Councilmember will be Margaret Chin, provided the city moves forward with approval before she’s term-limited out in 2021. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: There’s a house in Prospect-Lefferts Gardens that’s for sale that my wife is obsessed with. Once you see the photos of the $2.75 million pre-war house, you’ll become obsessed too. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos: Tribeca’s Pier 26 is now open, complete with a man-made tidal marsh called the Tide Deck. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The City Reliquary is in danger of closing. It’s one of the city’s oddest and most unique and interesting museums in addition to being a non-profit civic organization. In non-pandemic times, it is worth your visit. Now it needs your help. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

There will never be a story about the Grand Central Terminal lost and found that I will not link to. Years ago my best friend left an acoustic guitar on a Metro-North train and found it at the lost and found a few days later, just one of the roughly 2,500 items lost every month. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Here is the full list of NYC politicians being endorsed by Our Revolution, founded by Bernie Sanders. (amNewYork Metro)

How much does a life cost? Last year Matt Palacios was killed by Luc C. Vu, who was driving a dump truck and made an illegal left turn. Court records indicate that Vu’s driver’s license has been revoked for six months, that he paid a $250 fine on the failure to yield to a bicyclist charge, and that he will receive a conditional discharge in one year if he does not get into additional legal trouble. $250 for taking Matt’s life. (Mike Johnson for PWInsider)

“I don’t know what you call them — peaceful protesters — maybe spoiled brats at this point.” -NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea on NY1. The NYPD is on pace to spend more than $100 million beyond its budget for overtime this year. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

On the same night that NYPD officers stood by while protesters attacked civilians and a journalist during a Borough Park protest against Covid-19 restrictions, the police department arrested four Black Lives Matter activists in Bedford-Stuyvesant for low-level offenses and detained them for two nights before they were released. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Video: Watch the NYPD be unable to break up a massive celebration full of unmasked people blocking a street in Crown Heights last week and eventually give up and go home. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Hundreds of ultra-Orthodox congregants attended an indoor prayer service in Borough Park on Friday in open defiance of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s newly imposed restrictions on religious gatherings in COVID hotspots. The service was led by a rabbi who tested positive for Covid-19 one week ago. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

MSG and the Barclays Center are becoming voting locations on November 3. Yankee Stadium? Silence. In a neighborhood that could use the most help from a neighbor, the Yankees, who pay $0 in real state taxes and pay $1/year for the land their stadium occupies, have turned their back on the local community at nearly every opportunity. (Mary Steffenhagen for New York City News Service)

Congratulations to the NYC girls who have become some of the first to ever join Scouts BSA, formerly the Boy Scouts of America. (Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

The NYPL released a list of 200 book titles to get you election-ready. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Dizzy’s Diner in Park Slope after 22 years. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Turns out it pays to be in the crowd for SNL. No literally, the audience is being paid $150 to be considered cast members, since audience members aren’t allowed. Each “cast member” is given a rapid Covid-19 test before entering the studio. (Julia Jacobs and Dave Itzkoff for NY Times)

The Times is declaring cuffing season, but did the last cuffing season ever officially end? (Johan Engel Bromwich and Sandra E. Garcia for NY Times)

Farewell to 88 Lan Zhou in Chinatown, who will be closing on October 31. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The top 12 neighborhood pizza slices. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

How to support independent restaurants. (Bonnie Tsui for NY Times)

The Briefly for May 4, 2020 – The “Reviewing the Best and Worst Frozen Pizzas” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city tries open streets again, a brutal social distancing arrest caught on video, rent strikes take footing, 22 iconic dishes still available, and more

Today – Low: 44˚&nbspHigh: 65˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

You come across a cement fountain full of apples in a city park, what do you do? (EV Grieve)

The Times goes galaxy brain and asks “whether it will be even possible for riders to practice social distancing on a system whose core purpose is to carry throngs of people in confined spaces.” (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Watch Steve “ESPO” Powers work on a mural on boarded-up windows in Soho. (Noah Shiedlower for Untapped New York)

A judge dismissed the New York State Nurses Association’s lawsuit against Montefiore Medical Center in The Bronx demanding more protective gear and COVID-19 testing for health care workers, ruling that arbitration under a collective bargaining agreement between the union and the hospital was necessary. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

Restaurant critics tackle the best and worst of NYC’s frozen pizzas. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

If you were playing the “I know where that was filmed!” game with the season premiere of Billions last night, you can check the answers with Billions’ NYC filming locations. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A team of film and television set builder volunteers is building intubation boxes for local hospitals out of an IATSE union training workshop in Queens. The team of six has built 46 boxes so far, thanks to their time and a GoFuneMe account. (Ben Verge for Brooklyn Paper)

Evangelical Christian relief organization Samaritan’s Purse and their field hospital are leaving Central Park in two weeks as COVID-19 hospital admission is reaching “manageable levels.” (Sophia Chang for NY Times)

The field hospital is leaving, but that doesn’t mean you can let your guard down. The city’s next focus should be on preventing a second wave, which is why the city won’t be lifting restrictions. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Videos are emerging of an absolutely brutal pair of arrests by the NYPD. While three plainclothes officers are arresting someone for marijuana possession while supposedly enforcing social distancing on Saturday, a fourth officer who was not wearing a mask or gloves brutally beat someone for standing too close. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Metropolitan Opera’s weekly streaming schedule has been released. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

The connection between New York and Puerto Rico has always been special. This week, 16,000 pounds of fresh fruit and produce from Puerto Rican farmers arrived in the Bronx, which will be donated to community centers, senior citizens, and low-income families. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

A touch of good news: Lenox Hill Hospital released its 1,000th COVID-19 patient on Thursday afternoon. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Governor Cuomo made it official: No one is going back to school this school year. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Each month calls for Governor Cuomo to take more action to provide real rent relief, not just displacing payments, will grow louder and the resources for tenants looking to form rent strikes in their buildings become more readily available. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A guide to rare liquors being sold by restaurants and distilleries. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

The Brooklyn funeral home that was stacking bodies in an unrefrigerated truck had its license suspended by state health officials. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

The New York Public Library released “Missing Sounds of New York” on Soundcloud and Spotify, an album of collected sounds that you might be missing from your life lately, like stumbling on an unwelcomed performance on the subway, or a party you weren’t invited to happening outside your window, or a loud bar. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The Physical Plant, a LIC nonprofit, put together “Dance Shorts,” a compilation of 16 dance videos that run together to make an 80-minute series. The Physical Plant is having a Facebook Watch party tonight to celebrate the release. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

For $10,000, you can have Death & Co set up their bar in your home for five hours of drinking. This is, of course, redeemable after its safe for anyone to come to your home. They’ll bring the necessary glasses, booze, bartenders, and everything for a four-course dinner. It’s not just an outrageous purchase, which is it is, but 20% of the sales will go towards the bar’s emergency staff relief fund. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The NYPD was forced to break up another funeral for a rabbi in Borough Park, Brooklyn. (NBC News)

The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation is offering personal help to look through their archives of over 65 million documents to research your family’s history if they came through Ellis Island. The documents are available online for free, but the help costs $30. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

This is why we can’t have nice things. Green-Wood Cemetery opened its gates for extended hours to help ease the stress of always being around the living, and a small percentage of people have violated the cemetery’s rules, which could cause the cemetery to close. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s first wave of open streets kicks off this week and it seems as stupid as possible. Of this month’s 40 miles of streets to open up, 7 miles of open streets were open this weekend. 4.5 miles are inside parks and 2.7 miles are adjacent to parks. What’s the point of adding open streets next to a park? (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The NYPD and the Department of Transportation are doing their best to walk back their comments about needing “a legion of cops” to man the barricades. That and running coverage from Streetsblog of the first weekend of open streets. (Streetsblog)

22 restaurants still offering iconic NYC dishes. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

Thank you to Katie for today’s featured photo! Hello Katie’s mom!

The Briefly for March 13, 2020 – The “How Does A Strip Club Fight COVID-19?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: COVID-19 in NYC, the secret gardens of the Upper West Side, new restrictions on gatherings, Broadway is closed, there are no more pro sports, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 66˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 35˚ High: 55˚

Video: Four of six candidates for Queens borough president debated at Queens College on March 9. (Angélica Acevedo for QNS)

The Palm steakhouses have been owned for 93 years by the family that launched them, but they have sold to the company that owns the Rainforest Cafe in a $45 million deal. (Serena Dai for Eater)

360° Video: From the top of Edge NY’s outdoor deck. (Action Kid)

The Coney Island Polar Bear Plunge raised $60,000, which was distributed to multiple community organizations, including the New York Aquarium, the Alliance for Coney Island, Coney Island USA, the Coney Island History Project, Coney Beach Brighton Beach Open Water Swimmers, New York State Marine Education Association, New York City Parks Foundation, the Coney Island YMCA, and Parachute Literary Arts. If you ever wondered “why does anyone do that?,” this is the benefit of having a wild idea on January 1. (John Alexander for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The title is 12 buildings that should be brought back, but if you’re looking to explore some of old New York’s masterpieces, here are 12 of them. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Bronx Brewery in planning a second location in the East Village on Second Ave between 3rd and 4th. The location should be opening in the fall with a brewery, live music, and a kitchen with “special guest” chefs. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The best restaurants in the West Village, because we’re not all going to be making all of our own meals in perpetuity. (Bryan Kim, Katherine Lewin, Hillary Reinsberg, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Conor McGregor donated $1 million to the first responder Steven Siller Tunnel To Towers Foundation to make good on a 2018 promise. (amNewYork Metro)

If you’ve got plans to binge the Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, you might ask yourself, “If I were her friend, where would I live?” and also “Could I afford it?” Here are your answers. (Localize.City)

The secret gardens of the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)


I won’t list things that are closing but assume that everything, everything pro sports and everything Broadway, is canceled or postponed unless you explicitly hear otherwise, with the exception of city schools, the Queens borough president election, and the census. Before going anywhere or doing anything, please call and confirm.

The state’s public emergency health plan has two prongs: reducing the spread and treating the infected. “There is no end date.” (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The mayor’s press conference about the coronavirus outbreak on Thursday afternoon was somber and reassuring at the same time. If you have the endurance to watch over 90 minutes, the video is available. (NBC News)

The Archdiocese of New York announced it was closing all of its elementary schools for at least a week and would reassess the situation on March 20. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Early voting in the Queens borough president’s race starts on Saturday. Is the city ready for its first coronavirus election? (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Subway ridership is unsurprisingly down 18.65% from a year ago as as many people as possible are staying home. (Dana Rubinstein for Politico)

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Late Night with Seth Meyers, The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, Last Week Tonight, and The Daily Show with Trevor Noah are joining most daytime shows in filming without studio audiences moving forward. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

I got a text from a friend yesterday that the school nurse for their school was out and one of their students was displaying signs of a fever and coughing. He told me his school didn’t have a backup plan aside from sending the student home immediately.

COVID-19 is showing is just how woefully unprepared our school nurse situation is. The city plans on hiring enough nurses to distribute one in each building by today, but these nurses will be contractors with the city and as a result will be unable to access students’ medical records. Not an ideal situation for making medical decisions. (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

When people stop showing up to a senior center like the Open Door Senior Center over COVID-19 fears, it doesn’t mean they aren’t in need of a meal. How do you provide a meal to someone staying home in fear? ( Gabriel Sandoval and Claudia Irizarry Aponte with additional reporting by Josefa Velasquez for The City)

If we’re all going to be seeing more of the inside of our apartments more, maybe it’s time to tackle some of those long-standing projects we’ve been thinking about. The story of how Lauren Rothman was unable to change to a different apartment, so she changed her apartment. (Lauren Rothman for Curbed)

The state’s finances are based on economic growth, which means the next fiscal year, which starts on April 1st, is completely screwed by COVID-19, which will have years of ramifications for the state. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Advocates are worried undocumented New Yorkers will be scared to seek medical help for COVID-19 symptoms. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

No matter what you heard early in the day on Thursday, the child who self-reported as having COVID-19 in the Bronx does not have the illness and the school they attended will be open on Friday. The school system may explore a “summer school model,” with a limited shutdown. (Sophia Chang, Jessica Gould, Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

There’s gonna be a lot of beer that goes undrank and a lot of corned beef that goes uneaten on St Patricks Day. (Erika Adams for Eater)

No gathering of more than 500 people can happen in New York and the legal capacity of just about everywhere has been cut in half. In addition, the mayor said that MSG and the Barclays Center should be expected to be closed for months. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Restaurants will have to reduce their capacity by 50% as part of the new preventative measures put in place. The mayor re-iterated while outlining the new policy that this could be a six0month health crisis with a longer economic recovery period. The city is offering no-interest loans, but this crisis is going to be absolutely apocalyptic for the city’s restaurants, which already operate on slim margins. (Serena Dai for Eater)

A longstanding New York trade organization representing restaurants is calling for the state to offer tax breaks and cap food delivery service fees — in addition to a host of other requests, as the industry prepares for drastic economic consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. (Erika Adam for Eater)

Alex Jones, a human backflowing sewer pipe and conspiracy theorist, was selling toothpaste, creams and several other products that claim to treat or prevent and cure COVID-19 on his website. Attorney Letitia James immediately sent him a cease and desist. (Noah Higgins-Dunn for CNBC)

How does a strip club like FlashDancers handle an outbreak like COVID-19? (Tribeca Citizen)