The Briefly for August 19, 2019 – The “Daniel Pantaleo Lied About The Chokehold” Edition

The MTA’s board is as functional as their trains, the rice cooker guy is caught, Nutcracker summer, finding hidden parks and gardens, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subway work is relatively light this week, but still inconvenient if you’re on the 2, 3, 7, A, E, N or Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

Registration for the 2019 Daffodil Project is available. The Daffodil Project was created post-9/11 to create a living memorial to September 11 city-wide by giving out half a million bulbs a year to be planted in public spaces. (New Yorkers for Parks)

It’s been 14 years since the renovations at the Rugby branch of the Brooklyn Public Library started and we’re still a year away from seeing it completed. (The City)

Jose Alzorriz is the 19th cyclist to be killed by a driver on the city’s streets this year. A petition with over 1,000 signatures is calling for a traffic safety study of Coney Island Avenue following his death. (amNY)

Judge Rosemarie Maldonado’s ruling of Daniel Pantaleo’s involvement in the death of Eric Garner is that he was “untruthful” when he said he didn’t use a chokehold and its use was “a gross deviation from the standard of conduct established for a New York City police officer.” So what now? The city waits for commissioner James O’Neill to hopefully fire Pantaleo. (NY Times)

CitiBike is celebrating the one year anniversary of its Reduced Fare Bike Share program with a free month of membership to NYCHA residents and SNAP recipients starting today. (amNY)

In order to accommodate longer buses, the MTA is cutting nine stops from the B38 bus line, which services from Ridgewood in Queens to Downtown Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Paper)

The history and tradition of opening fire hydrants to cool off. (NY Times)

Two things of note: There is a Coca-Cola Freestyle competition and Queen’s Danuta Rybak is one of the five finalists. (QNS)

17 lighthouses to check out before the summer is over. (Untapped Cities)

This weekend is a “Clear the Shelters” weekend, where the ASPCA will be waiving adoption fees for cats and dogs on Saturday. It’s time to get that cat or dog you’ve been thinking about. (Gothamist)

The six best neighborhoods in Brooklyn for a budget. (StreetEasy)

Sixth Ave in Chelsea is deadly for pedestrians and cyclists. A pedestrian, hit by a driver last week, died of her injuries. Over 130 people have died on city streets this year, up from 108 at this time last year. (Streetsblog)

This week’s list of restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health. (Patch)

The MTA is removing bus schedules from its bus stops in an attempt to save money. Replacing them is a sign to call 511 or download the MTA’s app. Sixteen politicians from Queens are pushing back, pointing out that access to a cell phone isn’t always a guarantee and the $550,000 saved on bus schedules seems like a drop in the bucket compared to the $42 billion deficit expected by 2022. (amNY)

If you love seeing rats, Brooklyn is your borough. (Bushwick Daily)

Could Tiffany Cabán’s big to win the Democratic nomination for Queens DA have ended with her nomination without the NY Working Families Party? (The Indypendent)

If you missed the Perseid meteor shower, Scott Segler made a time-lapse. (Viewing NYC)

The Brooklyn War Memorial (and nearby bathrooms) will be undergoing renovations starting in November. The monument has been closed for 27 years. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Blue Point Brewing Co is opening a literal underground brewpub. Granted they’ll only have a two-barrel system, but it’s an A for effort. The Hull is expected to open in October. (amNY)

11 people in the city have been hospitalized and treated for “severe lung trauma” after vaping with products THC and nicotine. This isn’t exclusive to New York, similar illnesses have been reported nationwide. (Gothamist)

We may not have jetpacks, but liquid nitrogen, hydraulic presses, and centrifuges are all being used to make cocktails. (Viewing NYC)

A vegan guide to Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The cast of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is raising funds for the homeless youth of the city through Covenant House with a “sleep out” tonight. It’s not about simulating the experience, though Rachel Brosnahan and some cast-mates will be sleeping on 34th St, but raising funds and awareness. Donations can be made at sleepout.org. (amNY)

The MTA’s board is about as functional as the MTA’s trains and buses, as a recent meeting devolved into a shouting match between two members. (amNY)

You can tell your uncle to stop posting on Facebook about Jeffrey Epstein’s death because it was determined to be suicide by the city’s medical examiner. A look at the last days of Jeffrey Epstein. (NY Times)

Video: Watch the boring machine break through the end of the Delaware Aqueduct tunnel repair as the Department of Environmental Protection closes in on a $1 billion repair project. (Gothamist)

A look at Dexter Park, a 20,000 baseball stadium in Woodhaven which was home to the Bushwicks, a semi-pro baseball team part of the Inter-city Baseball Association. (QNS)

The man in the video circulated by the NYPD in connection to the bomb-scare rice cookers left around Manhattan on Friday, 25-year-old Larry K. Griffin II, was taken into custody on Saturday. (NY Times)

Seven Republicans are rushing to lose an election to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Politico)

A map of the city’s hidden parks and secret gardens. (Curbed)

This summer is the Hot Girl Summer, but every summer in New York City is Nutcracker Summer. (NY Times)

The Briefly for July 5, 2018 – The NYC Food Cart Black Market, the Statue of Liberty Protester ID’d, Is de Blasio a Liar, and More

NY state fights back agains the SCOTUS union decision, new information about an explosion from 2016, Lou Gehrig’s retirement speech, a record setting Christmas tree, and more in today’s news digest.

George Wesley Bellows, Excavation at Night, 1908
George Wesley Bellows’s Excavation at Night from 1908 depicts the original Penn Station dig.

This must be some kind of record for Christmas trees.

Opening a fire hydrant to cool off is a tradition that goes back over a century. Reminder: you can request a spray cap from the city.

The story behind Lou Gehrig’s famous July 4th retirement speech.

Food cart permits are selling for as much as $25,000 on the black market because the city capped the number of permits at 5,100. Mayor de Blasio it trying to revive a plan to add 3,000 more food cart permits over the next ten years.

Hot dogs were eaten, records were set.

Filming Around Town: Amazon’s The Tick is back at 37th St and 34th Ave in Astoria, Netflix and Spike Lee’s She’s Gotta Have It is in Brooklyn Heights near the promenade, The Deuce is at Pleasant Ave 118th St, CBS’ The Code is at Greenwood Cemetery, and Showtime’s Ray Donovan is at W 58th and 8th.

The NYPD released new information about an unsolved 2016 explosion in Central Park, hoping for some new leads.

Therese Patricia Okoumou, a 44-year-old immigrant from the Democratic Republican of Congo free-climbed the base of the Statue of Liberty in protest of many of President Trump’s actions. Rise and Resist had a scheduled protest on Liberty Island but claims Therese wasn’t part of their group.

Is de Blasio a liar? City Comptroller Scott Stringer thinks the city has to come clean about the NYCHA lead paint scandal.

10 can’t miss summer art shows from The New York Times.

State Assemblyman Richard Gottfried has “workaround” legislation to counter the SCOTUS union decision. His legislation would allow unions to include collective-bargaining costs in their contracts with government agencies to replace the mandatory fees that SCOTUS banned.