The Briefly for April 23, 2019 – The “DA’s Secret List of Tainted Police Officers” Edition

Someone is smashing the LinkNYC kiosks, $3,000 “affordable” apartments, Di Fara’s pizza, fighting back against the paper bag tax, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Someone is smashing LinkNYC kiosks in Chelsea. It could be someone trying to send a message to neighborhood resident Google, who basically owns them and the data they collect. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

It’s been discussed for over a dozen years, but the federal government’s Opportunity Zone program may be the catalyst that changes Willets Point forever. (The Real Deal)

Taxed to death. That’s how Queens City Councilmember Robert Holden views the city’s paper bag nickel tax when plastic bags become banned. (QNS)

The city’s DAs keep secret lists of NYPD officers who have perjured themselves in criminal prosecutions in order to avoid using them as witnesses. Civil-liberties advocates are calling for a review of past convictions based on testimony from potentially tainted officers. (Gothamist)

He’s not wrong, New York’s taxes paid per income is 12.7%, the highest in the nation and 22 of the top 25 counties paying the highest amount of taxes are in New York state. Manhattan specifically pays 2.7% of all federal income tax collected with only 0.48% of the country’s population. (Business Insider)

Say hello to the newest restaurants in the city. (amNY)

Kudos to Queens educator Danielle Hnath, who promised her students she would dye her hair blue if they raised over $8,000 for the American Heart Association. They raised $10,000. (QNS)

Technically they apply, but something doesn’t seem right about a $3,000/month apartment on Staten Island qualifying as fulfilling the mayor’s promise to create 300,000 “affordable” apartments. (The City)

The top twelve restaurants serving the underrated food of Puebla, Mexico. A very specific list. (Eater)

NYCWiN, which went down for a full week due to a Y2K-esque bug, cost the city a billion dollars. Northrup Grumman’s contract has been extended to June 2020 for $40 million. (Patch)

A look back at Five Points, not the mural space, the most notorious neighborhood in the city’s history. (StreetEasy)

The best neighborhoods for New Yorkers over 65, or the best neighborhoods for people under 65 who want to live in a very quiet apartment building. (6sqft)

A series of self-guided and thematic NYC exploration walks, created by New Yorkers. (r/NYC)

The NYPD, having solved the city’s other problems, targeted a “Race and Bake” bike ride on 4/20, showing up to arrest the organizer with printouts of his social media posts. He was arrested for an open ticket container ticket he got in 2015. (Gothamist)

How Di Fara became an NYC pizza institution. (Viewing NYC)

Inside a recycling center, from truck to 1,000 plastic bales. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city wants to expand Staten Island’s dockless bike share program, but without the entire island having a single bike lane. (Streetsblog)

The eight oldest buildings in Queens. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA, in a surprisingly logical move, is looking to add solar panels to the roofs of its train yards, bus depots, and buildings. (amNY)

Get ready to vote in a completely different way. The Charter Revision Commission’s preliminary staff report hint that the city will end the practice of costly runoff elections during primaries by adopting ranked choice voting. (The City)

Ranked choice voting, aka the alternative vote, explained. (CGP Gray)

Where to have a unique dining experience. Yeah, it’s not exactly a descriptive title for a list of restaurants, but lets’ be honest that you’ll probably click on it anyway because it’s the last link in the email and you’re probably more than a little curious, no? (The Infatuation)

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