The Briefly for May 21, 2019 – The “Great White Sharks in NYC Waters” Edition

The city gets serious about Long Island City, the era of OMNY has arrived, the MTA cuts bus service and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The bill that would criminalize “texting while walking” is DOA. (Streetsblog)

“I told all my friends they’re never going to see me in the Staten Island Mall again.” (Curbed)

The new logo for privately owned public spaces was unveiled from 600 entries. It’s three chairs. (amNY)

Scared of sharks? A ten-foot long great white shark was spotted a few dozen miles from the city. Just in time for the holiday weekend! (Patch)

Right now students can get a half-priced MetroCards if they live within walking distance of their school. Students often wind up paying the remainder in coins, causing the bus system to grind to a halt. This is why the city wants to get rid of them in favor of free MetroCards, good for three rides a day from 5:30am to 8:30pm for school-related activities. (Patch)

A Brooklyn Community Board approved of a protected bike lane on Flatbush Avenue from Grand Army Plaza to Empire Blvd, mirroring Prospect Park West’s lanes. (Streetsblog)

The history of New York City’s original rooftop bars. (6sqft)

Punk Island added a slew of bands to the lineup of the free punk festival on Randall’s Island, with the addition of a stage whose goal is to raise awareness for mental health and drug addiction in addition to free Narcan training and distribution. (BrooklynVegan)

Photos from Saturday’s 13th Dance Parade in the East Village. (Gothamist)

Say hello to Summer Sucks, an ongoing series from Gothamist. (Gothamist, duh)

Where to get all dressed up and not feel stupid. (The Infatuation)

It seems that only now that Amazon’s HQ2 is a distant memory, city officials are getting serious about developing the Long Island City waterfront and this time around they’re including the neighborhood in the discussions. (The Real Deal)

The state’s Attorney General opened an inquiry into more than a decade of lending practices that left thousands of immigrant taxi drives in debt, while the mayor ordered an investigation into the brokers who arranged the loans. (NY Times)

No one wants to talk to Steve Doocy. (HuffPost)

The Vendy Awards, New York’s awards for street eats, will come to a close after 15 years. (Grub Street)

Attention. If you lost an absolutely gargantuan inflatable pink flamingo in the East River, it has been found. (Gothamist)

Idea: Buses can’t run late if there are no buses! The MTA is curring service on 13 bus lines this summer. (Streetsblog)

How’re the subways treating you? The MTA says they’ve hit a five-year high of being on time. The percentage? A solid C+ at 79.8%. (Sunnyside Post)

Welcome to the era of OMNY. (mtainfo)

Meet some of the 42 heroes who are fostering 90 kittens for the ASPCA. (amNY)

Four Department of Education executives claim that they are victims of “reverse racism.” (The Root)

Here’s a look at what’s open and closed on Memorial Day. (Patch)

A look back at the Coney Island that was, through the archive of the New York Times’ photography. (NY Times)

“I consider it a social experiment, I wanted to see how people would respond to this character.” The character the saran wrapped Shiva. (Bushwick Daily)

There has been an 82% rise in anti-semitic attacks in the city compared to last year. (Bklyner)

In light of the spike, Speaker Corey Johnson is calling on the mayor to fully fund the Office of Prevention of Hate Crimes, which was approved by the city council this winter. The mayor has only funded 70% of the office. (amNY)

A gang member who participated in the killing of 15-year-old Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz said that a mistake led to the attack. (NY Times)

The MTA reports that the L Train Slowdown is going as planned. Is anyone else tired of hearing about how resilient New Yorkers are? (amNY)

Congratulations to this year’s Obie Award winners. The Obies honor Off Broadway and Off Off Broadway work, and “What the Constitution Means to Me” was named best new American play. (NY Times)

“What is art,” you may ask yourself while looking at photos of slop buckets from a restaurant in Park Slope. (Viewing NYC)

24 ideal outdoor bars in the city. (Eater)

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The Briefly for July 2, 2018 – 820 Children Poisoned with Lead, Astoria Subways Closing, High Line Honey Controversy, and More

Two Astoria subway stations close for renovations, and there is too much poop in the water, too much lead paint on the walls, and too many postal parking placards being abused in Park Slope.

A wall recently painted white with a pair of sneakers hanging ifrom a power line above it
Ready in Bushwick

The Broadway and 39th Avenue Q/N stations in Astoria are closed for renovations beginning today.

Expect lots of police around the city during the fireworks this Fourth of July. Lots.

Flushing Bay no longer smells like a toilet because 89,000 cubic yards of decaying organic material (that’s poop, they’re talking about poop) was dredged from the bay as part of a $200 million cleanup project. The wetlands restoration project will be complete by the end of July.

Three Brooklyn beaches were closed for 101 days last summer because there was too much fecal bacteria (poop, again, it’s poop). The poop beaches in question are Kiddie, Manhattan, and Kingsborough Community College beaches. Check the city’s know before you go program to see if your beach is to poopy. 27 billion gallons of raw sewage are dumped into the New York Harbor every year.

The quaintest dead end streets of Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn, from Untapped Cities.

WNYC and Gothamist’s coverage and investigation into Gramercy Park has reached the mayor, who said the city should reassess the private park’s tax-free status.

Start talking to your neighbors and stop calling 311, especially in gentrifying neighborhoods. BuzzFeed dove into 311 complains to discover the friction between new residents and the neighborhood.

Two days after NYC Parks Commissioner declared Central Park “will be entirely and permanently car-free,” a cyclist collided with a garbage truck. Turns out “car-free” doesn’t apply to city vehicles.

Filming Around Town: Tell Me A Story, starring Kim Cattrall, is at Remsen and Clinton in Brooklyn, The Deuce, starring James Franco, is at 7th and 2nd, and Aviva is at 72nd and 5th.

City councilperson Brad Lander was one of the people arrested protesting outside of State Senator Marty Golden’s office.

The John J. Harvey for a World War I era makeover from artist Tauba Auerbach and is a sight to behold.

A look inside Overthrow Boxing, part boxing gym and part throwback to the Bleecker Street of old.

State Supreme Court Justice ShawnDya Simpson appears to to be living in New Jersey and stretching the definition of what it means to “reside in New York” to keep her job on the court.

820 kids in NYCHA apartments have been poisoned by lead paint. The NYCHA has been avoiding lead-paint regulations for years and the cost of avoiding those regulation is poisoning children.

TD Bank created High Line Honey to show how important bees are to a sustainable food supply, but their choice of Andrew Cotes as beekeeper is proving to be controversial.

On the same block where two children were killed in a car accident in Park Slope is the Van Brunt Post Office, notable for the volume of double parking that regularly occurs. Employees of the post office have been caught abusing parking placards by the Brooklyn Paper. Their placards are being revoked and postal placards will no longer be issued.