The Briefly for September 4 – 5, 2020 – The “A Real Turd of an Idea From Cuomo” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The latest on indoor dining, mall and gym reopenings, indoor and outdoor schooling, the rolled-up cheese sandwich, 13 to-go negronis, and more

Today – Low: 67˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 66˚ High: 81˚

What’s open and closed on Labor Day. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

62% of New Yorkers believe the worst is yet to come when it comes to Covid-19, according to a Siena College Research Institute poll. 82% believe the state will face another large outbreak in the fall. Who says New Yorkers aren’t optimistic? Apparently New Yorkers. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The bonkers story of Gennaro Brooks-Church and Loretta Gendville, the eco-yogi slumlords of Brooklyn. (Bridget Read for The Cut)

A rolled-up cheese sandwich, a cup o noodles, Pop-Tarts, and the other Bushwick-esque foods being offered by bars in, yes, Bushwick. (Jackson Schroeder for Bushwick Daily)

A year ago, the city’s jobless rate was at 4.3%. This year unemployment is sitting at 20%. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The first statue of historical women in Central Park was unveiled, Women’s Rights Pioneers Monument, featuring Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

A Ford Taurus drove into a group of protesters on Thursday night in Times Square, injuring multiple people protesting the killing of Daniel Prude. The NYPD declined to say if the driver had been arrested. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The New York City public school system’s reopening will be delayed, with “instructional transition and orientation” starting remotely on September 16th and in-person learning pushed back to September 21st. (Sophia Chang, Jen Chung, and Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

“We’re trying to move heaven and earth to try to get buses in place by the first day of school.” How is it possible that the city has had the entire summer to get ready for schools to open and it’s not a given that the city’s children will have buses to bring them to school. According to the executive director of pupil transportation, “it’s really a day-to-day scenario.” (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The City Council met to hear concerns about Mayor de Blasio’s school opening plans. 140 people spoke, not one of them was a Department of Education official. According to one of de Blasio’s advisors, we’ll see”a resurgence.” Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer said she allocated $12 million for ventilation system upgrades in schools and the money hasn’t been spent, despite the city claiming poverty. School starts on September 21 and in-person classes start one week later. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Success Academy, the city’s largest charter school system, is going completely remote for the remainder of 2020a first look at what Covid-19 outdoor classes will look like. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Several city school teachers are filing for injunctive relief against the city and Chancellor Richard Carranza, asking a judge to block in-person learning at the city’s public schools. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

“Since coronavirus is less likely to spread outdoors, letting all New York City schools hold class in public parks and on cordoned-off city streets, on its face, seems like a positive development. But I didn’t need to read the fine print to know that our immigrant, Black, and brown communities — the ones that have been hit hardest by the COVID-19 crisis — would get the short end of the stick. I didn’t need to know who organized and petitioned for outdoor learning to know that the “nice white parents,” a perennial force for maintaining inequities in one of the nation’s most segregated school systems, would get their way. Again.”
-Lynn Shoh, a public school teacher, I advocate for outdoor learning. But NYC’s plan for it will further privilege ‘nice white parents’ for Chalkbeat

Diddy and educational speaker Dr. Steve Perry announced on Thursday that they are opening their latest charter school, Capital Prep Bronx, which aims to provide “historically disadvantaged” students with a standout curriculum, in order to prepare them with “college and career readiness skills.” (J’na Jefferson for The Root)

J’Ouvert festivities are canceled, but that isn’t stopping the NYPD from stepping up their presence this weekend in Brooklyn. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

A look at the history of the NYPD’s computerized system CompStat and why NYPD captains want to stop its usage. (Alexander Jusdanis for Bedford + Bowery)

The NYPD’s Police Benevolent Association endorsed Donald Trump president, which was a surprise to the Guardians Association, a fraternal order of Black police officers, who called the endorsement a “lack of respect” and takes police to “a dark place.” Let’s be honest here, the NYPD endorsing Trump is as surprising as your very obviously racist uncle from Alabama telling you about his collection of knives from WWII that just so happen to be from Germany. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Bronx Country District Attorney Darcel Clark announced that she would move to dismiss more than 300 of the curfew summonses issued during protests in Mott Haven on June 4. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

In the wake of the death of Layleen Polanco, the mayor said the NYPD should not be arresting people for sex work. The mayor has no authority over what the NYPD does and does not do and it’s up to district attorneys to decide to press charges against people who have been arrested. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

There are 200 people in city jails due to technical parole violations, lower than last year’s 726, but mostly due to Governor Cuomo’s push to reduce jail populations du to Covid-19 fears. Criminal justice advocates are pushing for the number to be zero. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Does the mayor have any authority in this city? Mayor de Blasio asked community boards to voluntarily lay off some of their pad staff to help contribute to the city’s $9 billion budget shortfall. The answer from some boards was “no.” (Kevin Duggan for Brownstoner)

Add the Barclays Center to MSG as a polling site this November, making both the largest polling site in their respective boroughs. (David Gannon for 6sqft)

Noticing a whole lot more “no-fee” apartments throughout the city? Pandemic, pandemic, pandemic. Normally in August, there might be 50% of all apartments in Brooklyn and Manhattan. This year the number is closer to 75 or 85%. (Michael Kolomatsky for NY Times)

RIP Tom Seaver, the Mets’ greatest player. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

Have you received a random copy of The Epoch Times, which is also known as “garbage?” You’re not alone. The pro-Trump newspaper was suddenly delivered to people in multiple Brooklyn neighborhoods surrounding Bed Stuy. (Jessy Edwards for The Brooklyn Reader)

A look at U Thant Island, Manhattan’s smallest island that’s also off-limits to the public. Wanna go visit? U Thant! I’ll be here all weekend. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

I’ll admit this has been a lot of bad news, but here’s a palate cleanser for you. 25 quotes about New York that fill us with immeasurable pride. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Photos: Rockefeller Center’s new major sculpture installation. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Governor is allowing malls will be reopening in the city on September 9. Food courts and other eateries will remain closed and no mallrats. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Myths and secrets of the Grand Central Clock. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The city is lowering the speed limit on nine roads to 25 miles an hour, the standard speed limit on city roads. This includes parts of Riverside Drive, Flatbush Ave, Northern Blvd, Bruckner Blvd, Short Parkway Service Rd, Dahlgren Pl, Webster Ave, and Targee St. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Apartment Porn: Four outdoor spaces, a wine cellar, and a ludicrously large shower can be found in shis $6 million Park Slope brownstone.

Another portion of the Highline, The Spur, is reopening to the public this weekend (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Congrats to Alaska and Montana for making the NY Covid-19 quarantine list. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A makeshift Breonna Taylor memorial has popped up outside St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery. (EV Grieve)

Here’s what to expect inside the city’s newly reopened gyms. (Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

Over 60% of restaurants and bars in the state are “likely” or “somewhat likely” to permanently close by next year, according to a New York State Restaurant Association survey of 1,042 responses. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Over 300 restaurants are suing the city for $2 billion for the city’s ongoing indoor dining plan. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

What’s the latest on indoor dining from the mayor? In his ever-changing public comments about it, he’s now pivoted to saying that there will be an answer by the end fo the month. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Governor Cuomo has a real turd of an idea. According to the governor, indoor dining could resume in NYC if the NYPD enforces compliance of regulations. Maybe he doesn’t remember why the NYPD was pulled from enforcing social distancing in the first place? It looks like an NYPD officer not wearing a mask properly with his knee on the neck of a person of color on the sidewalk. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Eater is keeping a running list of restaurants that have permanently closed. (Eater)

Opposite of that list, here’s a list of new restaurants that opened in NYC. (Eater)

The 21 most in-demand NYC outdoor dining reservations. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

13 to-go Negronis you can grab today. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for February 5, 2020 – The “Why Bother Having A Public Transit System At All?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Upper West Side asks for a study on street parking, the five best bacon dishes, the NYPD blames a jump in crime on the latest boogeyman, and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 44˚
Light rain in the morning and overnight.

A not completely accurate comic portrayal of New York’s zoos. (@pixelatedboat)

Here’s the full list of Catholic clergy accused of sex abuse in NYC. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

29 things that are regular here and weird almost anywhere else. (Mary Lane for New York Cliche)

Andy Byford’s last day on the job for the New York Transit Authority will be February 22 and advocates are starting to get worried about the MTA’s ability to move forward without him. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA is seeking proposals from ride-hailing services to help service transit deserts better by adding cars to bring people to the nearest subway stop during the hours of midnight and 5am. The details are nearly non-existent, like price and what locations would be served, but it’s a start. (Jose Martinez and Trone Dowd for The City)

Transit advocates are less than impressed with the MTA’s potential plan to subsidize for-hire car rides. Rather than address a real issue with transit availability, the MTA is punting to cabs to fill in the gaps it created. How long until the MTA uses this as an excuse to further cut back on night and weekend service? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city is working on a pilot program to bring a potential 5,000 basement apartments up to code in East New York, but at the same time they are also cracking down on illegal basement apartments elsewhere. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

Robert Sietsema’s top five bacon dishes across the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

What’s the top hotel in the city? Was your pick The Lowell Hotel New York on 62nd? According to US News and Reports, it’s #1. Check out the rest of the top ten. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Renderings: Check out what the pedestrian plaza will look like outside Grand Central this summer. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Does a perfect carrot cake exist? Does it come from Lloyd’s Carrot Cake in Riverdale? (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The train that lost power between Secaucus and Penn Station left New Jersey at 6pm and didn’t arrive at Penn Station until 10pm for a ride that usually takes 15 minutes. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

17 hidden gems in Flushing. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

All hail Pizza Rat, the unofficial subway mascot. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

New York’s tourism industry is taking a hard hit from the lack of Chinese tourists around the city, representing the second-largest foreign travelers in the world. (James Barron for NY Times)

The first person showing signs of coronavirus symptoms does not have coronavirus. The other two people showing symptoms have not been given a diagnosis. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

The Knicks fired their team president Steve Mills. Whoever takes the job for James Dolan next will either become a very wealthy person or the biggest idiot in the NBA. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Kids born later in the year are up to 70% more likely to be diagnosed as having a learning disability by the city’s public schools according to a new data analysis from the Independent Budget Office. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

It’s an inclusive sauna on wheels, and yes, it’s in Bushwick. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The NYPD isn’t supposed to talk about public policy, so why are they opening their mouths about bail reform? Oh right, because they police themselves and basically feel like they can do almost anything they want. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

January saw a 20% drop in murder, a 24% drop in hate crimes and an 18% drop in rape, but the overall volume of crime was up 17% compared to last January. The Police Benevolent Association’s Pat Lynch has decided this overall jump can be blamed on the NYPD’s latest boogeyman: bail reform. With the reforms being on the books for one month, it is impossible to make a direct connection between the two. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Incidents of slashings and stabbings in city jails surged 10.4 percent last year and physical confrontations between detainees and corrections officers rose sharply to a staggering 37 percent—and the City Council Committee on Criminal Justice is trying to find out why. (Matthew Benedetti for NY City Lens)

The NYPD is phasing out its activity log memo books in favor of an iPhone app. The books have been in use since the 1800s and the new app will centralize the information and leave less room for fudging the facts. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

22 go-to fast casual spots in the Financial District. (Urvija Banerji for Eater)

Brooklyn Bridge Park has new a public art installation at Pier 3. The large metal hoops are called “New York Clearing” by Antony Gormley and I’m going to withhold my judgement on this until I experience it firsthand, because it’s looking a little weird in the photos. (Gabe Herman amNewYork Metro)

An adult tree house is coming to this luxury Lower East Side high-rise. Of course it is. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

It took eight months, two closed-door sessions, and an hour of debate on the last night, but Community Board 7 on the Upper West Side has asked the city for a study curbside usage on the Upper West Side and explores the idea of paid residential parking permits. Eight months. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

“The usual?” 26 restaurants where you’ll want to become a regular. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for January 27, 2020 – The “Don’t Lean on the Subway Doors Today” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Brooklyn Flea revives the Chelsea Flea Market, Rafael Espinal quits City Council, $1,000 basement sleep pods, a library reording studio, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 45˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

The real estate lobby is already calling for changes and exceptions to the city’s law reducing emissions 40% by 2030 and 80% by 2050. The law passed in May of 2019. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

New legislation could extend voting rights to Green Card holders and noncitizens with work authorization in municipal elections. There are 660,000 New Yorkers that hold Green Cards. 27 council members support the bill, but Corey Johnson hasn’t expressed support yet. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

The R179 subway trains that were removed from service last month are back and safe, according to the MTA. The blame fell on the doors not being properly calibrated, but maybe don’t lean on the subway doors anymore. (Alejandra O-Connel-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Under the elevated tracks in Queens remains a dangerous place to be, as a bolt fell from the N/W tracks in Astoria, shattering a car’s sunroof. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

It hasn’t fully set in, but the reality of Train Daddy’s resignation is starting to wash over the city. Corey Johnson called his resignation a “crisis.” (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

A list of Byford’s biggest achievements during his two years. (Jake Offenhartz and Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Byford isn’t the only person leaving the MTA. Pete Tomlin is also resigning. Tomlin isn’t nearly as well known, but he’s an expert in signals and was the signals chief. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Fairway in Red Hook has been there since 2006, but its future is in doubt. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

An ode to the metal rat, this year’s lunar mascot. (Madeline Leung Coleman for Jezebel)

Three people in New York state have tested positive for Corona virus, and according to the mayor it’ll come to the city “sooner or later.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know about the Coronavirus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A Hershey Bar has a new meaning, as Hershey’s has opened a bar in the Barclays Center that serves alcoholic drinks made with Hershey’s, Reese’s, and Jolly Rancher products. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Did you know there is a recording studio in the central branch fo the Brooklyn Pubic Library? (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Continuing from the Stonewall Democratic Club’s endorsement of Elizabeth Warren, Lambda Independent Democrats of Brooklyn endorsed Warren and Jim Owles Liberal Democratic Club endorsed Bernie Sanders. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The Chelsea Flea Market is making a return under new management. The Brooklyn Flea has a new lease for the parking lot location and will be inviting original vendors back for the same prices. As the Brooklyn Flea does, they have announced that they will also be inviting food vendors, but it will not be the focus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

There’s a movement brewing to revoke the permits for the Brooklyn Flea’s Smorgasburg event during July or August to give locals in Williamsburg unfettered use of East River State Park. There are no plans for that in 2020. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Queens has a new speakeasy, the new Astoria’s Secret is hidden behind the facade of The Lingere Shoppe. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The real question about Byford’s departure. Will your commute get worse? Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

After using the term “yellow folks” to refer to Asians in an email, Manhattan Community Education Council 3 is calling for Brooklyn Community Education Council member Dr. Jackie Cody to resign. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Flushing’s (wet) Lunar New Year parade. (Jenna Gyimesi for NY City Lens)

A fire in Chinatown likely destroyed 85,000 items, some dating to the 19th century, from Museum of Chinese in America. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

The Museum of Chinese in America is fundraising as they attempt to save what they can and rebuild. (Bowery Boogie)

An attempt at a definitive guide to New York’s Chinatowns. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

You think you pay to much in rent? Check out these $1,000 a month “sleeping pods” in a basement that are being proposed in San Francisco. (Katie Canales for Business Insider)

The NYPD is finally changing how it endorses the mayor’s electric bike ban. The focus will be on “unsafe” riding instead of ticketing and confiscating the bikes of food delivery workers, as their previous focused seemed to be. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

One thing missing from the coverage of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s moronic “go back to Ohio” comments was that the day prior to making them he was a guest at a banquet for the Real Estate Board of New York. It’s easier to make a villain of transplants instead of looking at the root problem of real estate developers who donate to your campaign for mayor and create the buildings that all these Ohioans and Iowans are moving living in. (Queens Crap)

20 standout Korean BBQ restaurants to try. (James Park for Eater)

Brooklyn Councilman Rafael Espinal quit City Council for a job with the Freelancer’s Union and the people working in his office found out about his new job via a tweet. There will be a special election for his seat in May, which represents Cypress Hills, Bushwick, Brownsville, Ocean Hill and East New York. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Spotted Pig’s staff was told to seek other work, and customers have been told that last weekend would be the restaurant’s last. It seems like the restaurant couldn’t wipe clean the stain of Ken Freidman or the things he allowed to happen inside its walls. (Eater)

You’re a reader of The Briefly, so this doesn’t apply to you, but for everyone else, where to take someone to eat who is cooler than you. (Bryan Kim and Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)