The Briefly for December 18, 2019 – The “AOC vs Cuomo Round 2: The NYPD Subway Surge” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Mayor de Blasio has another new approach for the city’s homeless population, the hoax that led to an AMBER alert, the most expensive street on the planet, & more

Today – Low: 17˚ High: 37˚
Clear throughout the day.

Search for “de Blasio” “homeless” and “new approach.” Here are some highlights you’ll find:
– Jan 2015: “Shifts Strategy on Homeless Help”
– Dec 2015: “The most comprehensive street homeless outreach effort.”
– Apr 2016: “sweeping homelessness reforms”
– Feb 2017: A “blood and guts” war on homelessness.
– Dec 2017: “playing catch-up on unsheltered homelessness.”
– Mar 2018: an “innovative solution to the crisis.”
– Dec 2019: A new approach addressing street homelessness. (Mark Hellum for amNewYork)

Cluster sites are temporary apartments for the homeless in privately owned buildings and the mayor announced in 2016 that he would end the practice of using them by 2019. There are still 3,000 units of cluster housing in the city. Many nonprofits that operate cluster sites have hundreds or thousands of open violations, and continue to get business from the city despite it. (Joan Goldberg for Brooklyn Eagle)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was one of the leading voices in the effort that killed Amazon’s HQ2. Can AOC help the fight against Governor Cuomo’s NYPD surge in the subways? (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

When the United States misses its targets to reduce climate emissions, New York won’t be on the list of states that caused it to happen. (Aaron Short for Streetsblog)

The best Chinese food on the Upper West Side. (Acrienne Cooper for I Love the Upper West Side)

The scumbag of the week award goes to FDNY lieutenant Christopher Hughes, who was caught stealing from a charity event at a Catholic school fundraiser on Staten Island. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo seeks to redefine conditions under which a person is capable of giving consent, specifically in when someone is drunk. In a steady stream of announcements like a legislative “12 Days of Christmas” the governor has been unveiling one proposal a day leading up to his 2020 State of the State address. (Sarah Midkiff for Refinery29)

Revisiting Le Bernardin, “one of the city’s most thrilling and technically astute restaurants.” (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Everyone got the AMBER alert on Tuesday (unless you’re a monster and turned them off) for Karol Sanchez, who was kidnapped in the Bronx. A few hours later we found out it was a hoax set up by Sanchez as part of a feud with her mother, who she deems to be overprotective. (Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

The video for All I Want for Christmas is You has a New York connection, it was filmed in front of the iconic “Bronx Christmas House.” Unfortunately this year the house is dark for the first time in 46 years. (Ed Garcia Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Harvey Weinstein, NYC’s resident goblin, claims his back hurts too much to deal with a lawsuit to recoup a $45 million loan from him. What a tough year this much have been for him. 🙄 (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The LES, Sunset Park, Gowanus and the rest of the six NYC neighborhoods poised for major change in 2020. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The most expensive street not he planet is 57th St, aka Billionaire’s Row. It end one of four Manhattan streets in the top ten. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Mail-order iconic foods, the foie gras debates, bowl restaurants and all the restaurant trends Adam Platt never wants to see again. (Adam Platt for Grub Street)

There is a second legal fight against an apartment complex that would cast a literal shadow over the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens. A lawsuit is looking to overturn the City council’s approval and force the developer to do an Environmental Impact Survey. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

Falling building debris fatally crushed a 60-year-old woman on West 49th Street and Seventh Avenue in Manhattan on Tuesday morning. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The MTA gave a “sneak peek” at a complete redesign of Queens’ bus system on Monday night with an eye towards less redundancy, easier transfers, and more inter borough options. The full book on the redesign will be released in the spring of 2020. (Angelica Acevedo for amNewYork)

New York City has agreed to pay $12.5 million dollars to settle a class action lawsuit by people who were subject to invasive strip searches while visiting loved ones in jail. (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

The 24-hour NYC diner isn’t dead. Say hello to the new Soho Diner. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Attention NYC Millennials: The suburbs want you! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Here’s how the local centrists in Congress will vote on the impeachment. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

A defense lawyer suggested detectives had badgered and yelled at a 13-year-old boy before he admitted participating in the fatal mugging of Tessa Majors. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

The NYPD will encrypt their radios in 2020, cutting off press from real time reporting and also essentially killing how the Citizen app, Scanner 911, and Broadcastify get their reports. The move seems to fly in the face of the city’s attempts at making the NYPD more transparent and accountable. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

The hidden fees in no fee apartments. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork)

NYPD arrested a truck driver who they say fatally struck bicyclist Matt Travis in East Harlem last month and left the scene. (Eyewitness News)

Time Out New York’s 20 best dishes of 2019. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The Briefly for November 26, 2019 – The “Star Wars, But With A Heavy Bronx Accent” Edition

Where to eat at the city’s airports, National Grid ends their gas moratorium, Governor Cuomo accused of targeting the Working Families Party, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Queens DA-elect Melinda Katz named her 31-member transition team. (QNS)

A WELCOME sign has fully replaced the Watchtower sign on the Brooklyn waterfront. (Curbed)

This week is crunch time at the city’s Food Bank. (NY Times)

C-3PO himself, Anthony Daniels, claims that the robot is supposed to have the accent of a “used-car dealer form the Bronx” as originally envisioned by George Lucas. Yikes. (Welcome2TheBronx)

A mural celebrating video game streamer Daniel Desmond “Etika” Amofah was unveiled in Bushwick. Etika took his life in June and in a video before his death had said he was worried the world was going to forget him. (Bushwick Daily)

After the Coast Guard grounded over 20 ferries that service the city for safety problems, Monday morning’s commute was as chaotic as you might imagine for the 32,000 daily ferry commuters. (NY Times)

A new kaleidoscopic art installation, called Ziggy by the firm Hou de Sousa, is open at Flatiron plaza. It’s made from 27,000 feet of rebar and iridescent cord and is a part of the “23 Days of Flatiron Cheer” programming. (6sqft)

Dunkin Donuts is killing its styrofoam cups and Grub Street has a few suggestions with what you can do with all those cups you’ve been hoarding. (Grub Street)

Thanksgiving dinner is not uncommon, unless it’s on the L train. (Jezebel)

In the battle of Governor Cuomo vs National Grid, National Grid blinked and will end their gas moratorium. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With Bloomberg in the presidential race, all varieties of comparisons to Trump become fair game and lo, here is the first from The Real Deal, comparing Trump and Bloomberg’s personal real estate. (The Real Deal)

A look back at Bloomberg’s education record while he was mayor. (Chalkbeat)

Photos: Netflix turned back time in Little Italy over the weekend to promote “The Irishman.” (Gothamist)

Photos: More from Netflix’s “1975” Little Italy. (Grub Street)

The Nets have a new jersey, temporarily dropping the Brooklyn name in favor of Bed-Stuy, accompanied by the colors of the Boogie sweater made popular by the Notorious B.I.G. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Poly Prep Country Day School in Bay Ridge is being sued again for past instances of sexual abuse by a student who claims that the school protected his abuser, a priest and former teacher. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Here’s how the city is planning to handle its “zombie home” problem. (Curbed)

It’s official, Netflix is saving the Paris Theater with a long-term lease on the space. (NY Times)

The MTA is planning to reconstruct the existing Jamaica Bus Depot in 2021 and has no plans to address the parking situation, which has resulted in the storage of city buses on public streets. 18 elected officials in Queens sent a letter to the MTA urging the MTA to make room for indoor parking for buses to cut down on noise and pollution. (QNS)

Curbed’s holiday gift guide for people who love NYC. (Curbed)

Eater’s holiday gift guide for NYC gifts. (Eater)

PureWow’s gifts for New Yorkers that they will love. (PureWow)

For those who don’t want to leave the Upper West Side, here’s a gift guide while staying in the neighborhood. (I Love the Upper West Side)

A list of all of the shipping deadlines to get your mail to wherever it needs to go before Christmas. (Patch)

The MTA is happy to give you the details on its $51.5 billion capital plan, including $3 billion from the city, just as soon as it’s approved and fully funded. (amNewYork)

The mayor signed the bill banning the sale of foie gras into law. The ban goes into effect in 2022. (amNewYork)

Video: Macy’s revealed its holiday windows with this year’s theme “Believe the Wonder” (Viewing NYC)

Voting in New York will be simplified at the expense of third parties. The Public Campaign Financing Commission voted that for political parties to maintain a line on the state ballot, they must either draw 2% or 130,000 in the general election vote for governor or president every two years. The biggest impact this will have is to wipe the Working Families Party off the ballot. Critics point at this as the governor utilizing his power to kill the WFP. (NY Times)

Every year a warning goes out about an algae bloom in the lakes in the city’s parks that is dangerous or fatal to dogs. The combination of the city’s water, water depth, and heat makes for a perfect environment for bloom growth. The Prospect Park Alliance and Brooklyn College are working together on a potential solution. (Gothamist)

Where to eat at Newark Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and JFK Airport.

Thanks to Henry T. Casey for today’s featured image

The Briefly for November 1, 2019 – The “You Can’t Stop the Christmas Juggernaut” Edition

The weekend subway disruptions, everything about the 2019 NYC Marathon, MLB and Nike are screwing the Bronx, photos from Halloween, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend the clocks turn back an hour. Make sure to remember that on Sunday when looking at all your non-internet connected devices.

Getting around this weekend will continue to be tricky with the 3, 4, 6, 7, D, E, F, N, and R all with diversions. Maybe it’s best to follow the lead of the marathon and run where you need to go. Check the subways before you go. (Subway Weekender)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 NYC marathon. (Time Out)

Use this custom marathon subway map to find your way around the city on Sunday. (6sqft)

10 fun things to look for along the NYC Marathon route. (Untapped New York)

The best places to watch the marathon. (NY Times)

The corpse of Halloween isn’t even cool yet and the Winter Village at Bryant Park is officially open. (Time Out)

12 new public art installations to see in November. (Untapped New York)

Photos: The Village Halloween parade. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: West 69th St is a nice block that is very into Halloween. (Gothamist)

These political pumpkins spell out a simple message in the Village. (The Villager)

The story of how a sewing machine repair shop in the garment district run by a man with a penchant for collecting has become a trove of forgotten treasures and how he fights back the tourists that have no idea what his shop does. (NY Times)

There aren’t enough apartments in NYC. While that statement seems like the ramblings of a lunatic, it’s true according to “The Geography of Jobs” report, which shows that the city needs more housing to keep up with its explosive job growth. As a result, housing stock is increasing in Connecticut and New Jersey and more people are commuting. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball and Nike are working together to screw the Bronx. After city taxpayers paid $1.2 billion for Yankee Stadium, MLB and Nike cut a deal that only allows officially licensed MLB merchandise to be sold at “premium distribution points” near a stadium, which would freeze out nearly every business near Yankee Stadium from selling anything MLB-related. The Yankees’ COO has been working with MLB to resolve the issue, but as it stands right now eight businesses may find themselves up River Ave without a paddle. (amNewYork)

publicly said “something doesn’t fit” when it comes to Epstein’s death, stoking the interest of a million YouTube conspiracy theorists. (Politico)

It only took the mayor a day to roll back the heavily supported news that sidewalks on Fifth Ave would be expanded to make way for holiday window onlookers, saying that he hadn’t signed off on the idea yet. (amNewYork)

RIP Barneys. Sold for $270 million in bankruptcy court. (The Real Deal)

This is not how you play Untitled Goose Game. It is, however, how you capture a goose named Calista in Central Park with lead toxicity. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The city’s foie gras ban is, of course, going to be challenged in court. (Grub Street)

Say hello to New York, and the world’s, richest billionaires. (Patch)

Cultural Affairs Commissioner Tom Finkelpearl is leaving his job with coincidental timing after the Mother Frances Cabrini statue embarrassment. (Patch)

New data shows the NYPD rarely ever does anything with the honesty findings from the Civilian Complaint Review Board. 61 False Official Statement findings, which determine that an officer lied to investigators, were submitted and only five were substantiated. Another good reason to vote yes on question 2 in this year’s election. You can vote early through Sunday. (Gothamist)

Is a Wegmans a Wegmans without a Sub Shop? No serious, I don’t know the answer because I’m not someone who is insane for Wegmans. (Grub Street)

Take the stairs. More than 1,000 New York City elevators still need new inspections after faulty contractors gave them sub-par checks. (Patch)

The Times, always a few steps behind, has descended down the story of the Joker stairs between Shakespeare and Jerome Avenues. (NY Times)

10 raw bar picks. (Grub Street)

thanks to reader Mary for today’s fetured image!