The Briefly for September 25-26, 2020 – The “Now You Annoyed the Anarchists” Friday Edition

Friday’s NYC news digest: The growing Covid-19 cluster neighborhoods, restaurant reviews return with no stars, Corey Johnson steps away from the mayoral race, and more

Today – Low: 66˚ High: 78˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 69˚ High: 76˚

10 big differences between fall in NYC this year vs. last year.” I bet I could think of at least one of them. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

If we raise taxes on New Yorkers making more than a million a year, are they really gonna turn tail and leave? While the governor says he won’t raise their taxes for that very reason, he hasn’t shown any evidence that’s the case. Millionaires aren’t gonna choose to move to Hoboken because their taxes are high. That’s nobody’s first choice. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Even anarchists are annoyed that New York City was designated an anarchist jurisdiction. (Carson Kessler for The City)

Apartment Porn: This 5,500 square foot home in Brooklyn Heights is stunning, complete with a rooftop yoga studio, garden, and an indoor pool. For $8 million, it better be! (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Two Sunset Park meat purveyors face up to 20 years behind bars for pasting fake labels on their low-grade beef products to inflate their prices. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

After 21 years, the Amish Market in Tribeca is closing. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Brooklyn Municipal Building (I was married in that building) will be named after Ruth Bader Ginsberg. (NY1)

“Advocates for the LaGuardia AirTrain such as Gov. Cuomo and Port Authority Executive Director Rick Cotton promise a 30-minute or less connection from LaGuardia Airport to Manhattan via the AirTrain. It’s a myth.”
-Larry Penner, transportation advocate and historian, The Myth of the 30-Minute, One-Seat Ride on the LGA AirTrain for Streetsblog

The Times’ Pete Wells is back to writing restaurant reviews, but without any stars. This is similar to The Infatuation, who dropped its rating system while we’re in the end times. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Next week, the City Council will take up new legislation to potentially make outdoor dining permanent. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Did you know that NYC has a fruit-filled Instagram bakery scene? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Najhim Luke was indicted on second-degree murder and additional charges in the death of Brandon Hendricks, a 17-year-old high school basketball player who was shot in the Bronx by a stray bullet on June 28, 2020. (Norwood News)

According to a lawsuit, a CUNY graduate alleges that she was suspended after City Council Majority Leader Laurie Cumbo intervened in response to the student’s protest against Cumbo at a community board meeting last year. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

How many times have we said that the Industry City rezoning plan is dead? This time it’s actually dead. The developers have pulled their proposal. (Greg David The City)

The history of how the Industry City rezoning completely fell apart. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The MTA is looking to ban pooping on the subway. Does this mean that pooping on the subway is not currently banned? (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Responding to a tip in February 2019, the MTA discovered a a “man cave” was discovered underneath Grand Central Terminal, complete with couch, fridge, and TV. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

A look at The Elevated Acre, a little patch of (fake) grass overlooking the water in the Financial District. (Marianne Howard for Untapped New York)

The Met Opera canceled its spring season. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

There have been Covid-19 cases in 100 NYC school buildings. (Charon Otterman for NY Times)

Two yeshivas will shut down amid a coronavirus spike in several neighborhoods in southern Brooklyn. (NY1)

Congrats to Borough Park, Far Rockaway, Flatbush, Kew Gardens, Midwood, and Williamsburg, the six neighborhoods the city will be focusing a “hyper-local effort” to increase testing and outreach to fight Covid-19. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

“The ship has sailed. We’re headed toward another super spreading event.” Life in a Borough Park. (Jake Offenbartz for Gothamist)

“Last week, the New York City Council announced that it had passed a new bill allowing restaurants to add a COVID surcharge of 10 percent. The law will stay in place until 90 days after indoor dining is brought back to full capacity, but like so much else done over the past six months, it’s a gesture of help that does too little.”
-Chris Crowley, The COVID Recovery Surcharge Is a Farce for Grub Street

It’s not illegal to not wear a helmet while riding a bike in the city. Someone should tell these Barney Fifes who ticketed a cyclist for not wearing a helmet after being hit by a car. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The number of women running for the state Legislature has hit an all-time high, shattering the record set just two years ago. Good. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

The Gowanus Canal dredging is going to start mid-November. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

When’s the EPA’s cleanup of the Gowanus going to be finished? At least another dozen years. (Kevin Duggan for Brownstoner)

Eric Trump, the human toothpaste and orange juice combo, must testify in the state’s probe into the Trump Organization before the election on October 7. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Interview: Here is why Corey Johnson dropped out of the mayor’s race. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Video: The Krispy Kreme glaze waterfall in Time Square. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Governo Cuomo is back to what he’s doing best, talking shit about Mayor de Blasio’s inaction. This time, it’s focused on NYC being the only jurisdiction in the state that hasn’t started a mandated community dialogue on public safety. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

You knew it was coming: New Years Eve in Times Square is canceled. (Bill Pearls for BrooklynVegan)

15 exciting restaurants in Brooklyn open for outdoor dining. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 20-21, 2020 – The “Don’t Call This A Staycation” Sunday Edition

Sunday’s NYC news digest: A potpourri of news, a RBG statue, City Hall’s annual report card, what we miss from pre-pandemic NYC, how to pack an emergency bag, and more

Today – Low: 52˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be honored with a statue in Brooklyn. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

NYC’s legal community reflects on RBG’s life and work. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It feels insulting for for the city to push an advertising campaign that New Yorkers should “staycation” in New York City. Turns out when you remove the tourists from midtown, we still hate midtown. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has issued exactly zero summonses for mask non-compliance. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The anatomy of an NYC protest. Which role do you play? (Juliana Kim and Simbarashe Cha for NY Times)

New York City’s school reopening plans are still missing a key ingredient: enough teachers. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Parents and students react to the city’s constant waffling about the start of the school year. This feels like trying to read all of your summer reading in the weekend before school starts. (Sophia Chang, Gwynne Hogan, Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

The de Blasio administration released a 420-page document tracking City Hall operations for the last year. Murders are up. Juvenile arrests are up. Violent incidents in jails are up while population is down. The “excess death” rate” suggests the death toll from Covid-19 might be well over 50,000. NYPD response times are up. Response times for emergency complaints in NYCHA buildings is up. The homeless population increased. The good news? Rat complaints are down and there were new bike lanes built. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The report “Discipline in the NYPD 2019” outlines, but doesn’t detail, 339 cases in which officers faced departmental charges. Cops pleaded or were found guilty in 322 of those cases. Only 27 lost their jobs. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Murderinos: Look no further than your own backyard. The untold story of the Tompkins Square murder. (David Swanson for Village Voice from 1989)

Businesses around Yankee Stadium held a rally Thursday afternoon demanding that the city renegotiate the lease and tax deal that Yankee management worked out to stay in the Bronx under the Bloomberg administration, claiming that extra money obtained through the negotiation could help keep businesses surrounding the stadium stay afloat until fans are able to return to the stadium. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The 2020 fall foliage map. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

At the crossroads of art and commerce is the controversy at the Whitney, who canceled an exhibition of arresting responses to the pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests after artists of color criticized the Whitney for acquiring their work without consent and through discount sales. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

A look at how Governors Island could become a climate center for the city. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The mayor, possibly unaware that he is the mayor, made public comments about how outdoor dining “should become permanent.” Will he walk the walk or just talk the talk? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The pandemic tax? City Council voted in favor of giving restaurants the option to add a 10% charge to bills as an economic recovery support measure. The mayor supports the bill and once he signs it, it will be in effect immediately until indoor dining returns to full capacity. I guess the city’s response to us asking it to help restaurants is “help them yourself.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

If the last few years have seen the food world grapple with systemic issues like pay disparities, culinary credit, tipping, and harassment from either big-time chefs or everyday customers, the poorly regulated return of indoor dining — during a deadly pandemic, no less — feels like a middle finger to hospitality workers.
-Ryan Sutton, chief food critic for Eater, NYC’s Indoor Dining Comeback Fails Restaurant Workers. Here’s Why. for Eater

The city’s first store dedicated to Covid-19 essentials opened in Herald Square. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new report from Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office found that 57 percent of dogs tested at city-run shelters developed respiratory disease during their stays, among other troubling findings. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD is working with the Trump administration to blame violent crime on bail reform by bringing federal charges instead of local charges against people suspected of involvement in shootings. The NYPD’s own data shows a lack of a link between bail reform and the increase in violent crime, but the truth has never stopped the NYPD of Trump administration before. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The mayor announced he will force his staff to take an unpaid one-week furlough between October 2020 and March 2021 to save money. It will save under a million dollars. The mayor is currently looking for a billion dollars of savings or will lay off 22,000 city employees. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Wanna buy a T. rex skeleton? Stan, the T. rex, is up for auction on October 6 at Christie’s. (Zachary Smalls for NY Times)

Photos: Sunnyside has become the home of fairies. No, really. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Where to eat outside in Prospect Heights. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

A love letter to the 1993 Super Mario Bros movie, a movie about two brothers from Brooklyn. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

Indoor pools will be able to open on September 30 at 33% capacity. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Apartment Porn: A $16.5 million Upper East Side townhouse with a miniature pool and a roof garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

More than 170 New York City transit workers have been harassed or assaulted for asking passengers to wear masks. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

38 glorious Chinese restaurants open right now. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It’s not uncommon to see people sitting outside libraries in an attempt to use the free wifi. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Columbia’s marching band disbanded itself for “a history riddled with offensive behavior.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

Bankruptcy will not stop New York Sports Clubs from charging you your monthly fee. The state attorney general’s office is investigating. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Trick or treating is nor canceled this year, ensuring the scariest Halloween of all time. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There will be no snow days at all this year, as classes will move to remote learning in case of snow. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

Dante in Greenwich Village, voted world’s best bar by Time Out) is now offering canned cocktails. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

In praise of Gloria’s Caribbean, a Crown Heights mainstay. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s real estate market has been hotter than Manhattan’s, pre- and post-pandemic. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork Metro)

Time Out looks back to the 10 things we miss the most about the Before Times in NYC. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: “Doggy Bags” brings giant dog sculptures to the Garment District. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How to pack an emergency bag. Just in case. (A. C. Shilton for NY Times)

NYC’s most anticipated restaurants openings of fall 2020. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Briefly for September 13 – 14, 2020 – The “A Bat Is In Your Home. What Do You Do?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The UWS hates the homeless, the 1st Covid-19 school shutdown, the Village Halloween parade is canceled, reactions to indoor dining, & more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 76˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Dr. Anthony Fauci said a vaccine would need to exist for nearly a year before people might feel comfortable returning to theaters unmasked, which he said would likely be mid to late 2021. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

Flying military planes over NYC on 9/11 is pretty high on the list of 2020’s stupidest ideas and 2020 is a banner year for stupid ideas. It was canceled on request of the city after Mayor de Blasio admitted he didn’t know it was happening. That guy really has his finger on the pulse. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Village Halloween Parade is canceled. It was inevitable yet still sad. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

167 CEOs and corporate bosses wrote the mayor an open letter, asking him to take action on crime and quality of life issues or else “people will be slow to return.” It was signed by the CEOs of Lyft, Warby Parker, and the WNBA among others. Not only is their message extremely deaf to the moment, but they are also asking the mayor to be a leader, which is something he has proven he’s not. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The letter is 242 words and of these business leaders “need to send a strong, consistent message that our employees, customers, clients and visitors will be coming back to a safe and healthy work environment.” These are economic descriptions of people, not how you talk about your family, friends, and neighbors. These millionaires do not offer support for a city that is facing an economic crisis, they demand action from someone else. They want everyone to come back to their offices but haven’t said how they’ll protect us. They want our support for their cause but use the language of the president when describing our streets. (J. David Goodman, Emma G. Fitzsimmons, and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Upper West Siders banded together and hired a lawyer to expel the “scum,” “trash,” and “thugs” in their neighborhood. On Facebook, they discussed an armed uprising and how they could use wasp spray and dog shit against them. They hung a noose outside of where this “scum” was living. They even convinced the mayor to move them. Who was their enemy? Homeless New Yorkers. (Gwynne Hogan and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor’s decision to remove 300 homeless New Yorkers from a shelter on the UWS has cascading effects that will force 900 New Yorkers in shelters to be moved to accommodate the change. The personal stories of the city treating people like objects that can easily be moved around are heartbreaking, but at least those people on the Upper West Side are happy. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The Legal Aid Society has plans to sue the city over the “knee-jerk capitulation” over the ejection. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

There are bats in all five boroughs. Here’s what to do if a bat gets into your home. Step one: Impossibly, stay calm. (Christopher Mele for NY Times)

A senior advisor to Chancellor Richard Carranza, Alison Hirsh, has resigned her post from the Department of Education. She left the mayor’s office in June after the NYPD’s treatment of Black Lives Matter protesters. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s the story of how a 19-year-old in federal custody ended up hiding behind a loom in someone’s apartment in Sunset Park. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

SNL is returning on October 3. There’s been no word on guests, hosts, or audiences. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Congrats to Abeda Khanam, a teacher at Robert F. Wagner High School in Long Island City, for being named state Senator John Liu’s Woman of Distinction for 2020. (QNS)

Local Law 1932-A suspends enforcement of the personal-liability provision in commercial leases of COVID-impacted tenants and it’s set to expire on September 30, but City Council has plans of extending it through March of 2021. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Photos: The Trump Statues Initiative, which is bringing “living performance pieces” to the city’s streets, like “The Final Push” which features a “gold” President Trump in a golf cart being pushed by Laura Ingram and Sean Hannity over headstones. (Untapped New York)

NYC is now home to the world’s first-ever Makeup Museum. It’s now open with its debut exhibition “Pink Jungle: 1950’s Makeup in America.” (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea posted a photo to Twitter of the top brass of the NYPD and officers openly violating the state’s mask and event mandates at an indoor gathering with over 50 people inside police headquarters. The mayor called it “a mistake that needs to be rectified going forward.” (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A stroll through Pomander Walk, the city’s most exclusive street. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I Love NY is looking for volunteers to give foliage reports each week. Leaf peeper wanted! (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Department of Education confirmed there were 19 positive Covid-19 tests in city schools among teachers with two in one school, triggering an automatic 24 closure. Students don’t return until September 21. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

A look at Chloë Bass’s outdoor art exhibition “Wayfinding” in St. Nicholas Park. (Brian Boucher for NY Times)

A look at an unlikely for crime detterance: More pools. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

“Even with these ongoing concerns, expanded outdoor dining is … nice. Freed of these unnerving matters, expanded outdoor dining would be almost unthinkably pleasant. The fact is, for an ad hoc system that was initiated to help New York’s restaurants survive, expanded outdoor dining works remarkably well.”
-Alan Systma, Let’s Just Make Expanded Outdoor Dining Permanent for Grub Street

Indoor dining returns at a 25% capacity on September 30, but that alone will not save the restaurant industry. A look at what 25% looks like and interviews with several restauranteurs about what business looks like for them going forward. (Ben Yakas with additional reporting by Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

“The 25% is not going to buy us very much at all.” Paul Giannone, owners of Paulie Gee’s and Paulie G’s Slice Shop. Restaurants react to the return of indoor dining. (Hannah Albertine & Chris Mohney for The Infatuation)

Learn about Elizabeth Jennings: The NYC teacher who desegregated NYC transit. (Jerry Mikorenda for Atlas Obscura)

Apartment Porn: What’s a solarium? This $1.6 million East Village condo has a solarium. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Where to eat outside in Fort Greene. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The state’s Department of Labor has announced that an extra $300 in weekly federal pandemic unemployment benefits will start hitting bank accounts as soon as next week. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Trump administration has secretly siphoned nearly $4 million away from a program that tracks and treats FDNY firefighters and medics suffering from 9/11 related illnesses. (Michael McAuliff for Daily News)

When the headline is enough: Thoughts on the politics and possibilities behind the MTA’s Doomsday budget proposal. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave. Sagas)

Photos: A Red Phalarope found its way to Stuyvesant Cove Park on Saturday morning. It’s a rare sight in the city for birders and for the rest of us, it’s a cool little bird. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

The ten best fried chicken sandwiches in NYC. Yes, the Popeye’s sandwich made the list. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo!

Note from Rob: Thursday’s article about NYPD Assistant Chief Christopher McCormack was written by Joaquin Sapien, Topher Sanders, and Nate Schweber and co-published with ProPublica and included reporting and analysis from The City.