The Briefly for November 8, 2018 – The “No One Wants to Be On El Chapo’s Jury” Edition

Albany’s new faces, an investigation into Eric Garner’s death starts today, the elections aren’t over yet, a jury has been chosen for El Chapo’s trial, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Meet the five new faces headed to Albany to represent the city in the State Senate. (amNY)

The jury has been selected for the El Chapo trial, despite an “open rebellion” against the idea of being on the jury. (amNY)

Low-level marijuana enforcement is down 58% and arrests are down by 90% in one year’s time, thanks to Mayor de Blasio’s policy change in the spring. While the overall numbers decreased, it did not change the racial disparities of who is being policed. (Politico)

This is a different type of defense. A Columbia University student is claiming that he couldn’t have raped another student because he was “too drunk.” He claims to have drank enough to black out and claim he has a blood ties to Nazis. He sounds like a real winner. (NY Post)

10 memorable art installations at the Brooklyn Bridge, past and present. (Untapped Cities)

Of 142 garbage trucks from private companies inspected during the city’s one week crackdown, only ten were allowed to stay on the streets. During the week the city issued 1,070 summons. (NY Post)

You thought we were done with elections? With Letitia James becoming Attorney General on January 1, the city will schedule an election for Public Advocate. Anyone who can get enough signatures will be on the ballot. (amNY)

Not to be outdone by Shakespeare in the Park, Central Park’s SummerStage will also be getting an upgrade and will be ready for the 2019 season. (6sqft)

Is the Museum of Pizza “fine art”? (NY Post)

It’s time to go to The New York Botanical Garden, we’re almost at peak foliage. (amNY)

A guide to our current elected officials. (Curbed)

WFAN’s Craig Carton from “Boomer and Carton” is guilty of securities fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy to commit fraud. He could be going to prison for 45 years. (NY Post)

Rudy Giuliani divorce is shining a light on his peculiar spending habits. (Gothamist)

The NYPD blames the “current atmosphere” for the rise in hate crimes across the city. Don’t forget the NYPD blamed the increase in reported rapes on the #MeToo movement earlier this year. (Gothamist, amNY)

Eric Garner died on July 17, 2014. Four years later, the Civilian Complaint Review Board is beginning an investigation. (NY Times)

7 of the city top chefs share their favorite bodega food. (NY Post)

The average salary in NYC is $68,992. (TitleMax)

The Board of Elections can’t promise that the 2020 election will be better than 2018’s. In 2016, the BOE rejected a city offer of $20 million to find and fix systemic problems. (NY Post)

Not to be outdone by Amazon, Google is planning on hiring thousands of new employees and adding 1.3 million square feet of office space on the West side of Manhattan. (NY Times)

A restaurant where you dine alone and don’t speak to, or see, your waiter. (NBC New York)

All the free museum days across the city. (Time Out)


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The Briefly for September 12, 2018 – Sometimes You Gotta Break Some Stuff

Primaries are tomorrow, voting guides, polling locations, a guide to the IDC, 11 gila monsters in a car, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

VOTE TOMORROW

Look up where you will vote on Thursday.

Educate yourself with what to expect on Thursday’s ballot with the NYC campaign finance board voting guides.

If you or someone you know are hospitalized, you can request an absentee ballot today for tomorrow’s primaries.

An explanation of the I.D.C. and how it plays into this year’s elections, by The New York Times.

A last minute guide to voting on primary day, from the Gotham Gazette.


Forgotten New York gets nerdy about entrances to subway stations, including some historic work that dates back over 110 years at Borough Hall and Wall St.

Sometimes you gotta break some stuff, and there are two places in the city where you can pay to do just that.

There are still 1,100 of 12,457 school faucets throughout the city that are contaminated with lead.

Tips for new students in NYC from StreetEasy.

It’s almost fall, which means it’s almost food market season!

The NYCHA developments in the Upper East Side were ranked as some of the worst in the country.

The Staten Island Wheel was given another extension to get construction back on track, so we’ll come back to this on January 7, 2019.

State Senate primaries should never receive this much national attention, but Julia Salazar and Martin Malavè Dilan’s election keeps getting more bizarre. Salazar came out as a victim of sexual abuse at the alleged hands of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s spokesperson. This was ahead of The Daily Caller publishing a story about it.

Cultural Academy for the Arts And Sciences teacher Deidre DeLoatch won a $2,000 grant so that she and her students can immortalize Henrietta Lacks. Students will write poetry, conduct research and debate what it means to participate in a clinical study.

The mother of Madison Lyden, the Australian tourist killed while riding her bike in Central Park last month, against one of the drivers involved in the accident. Community Board 7 is calling on the DOT to install a two way bike lane to precent more deaths along Central Park West.

Are those 11 illegal Gila monsters in your car or are you just happy to see me?


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The Briefly for August 17, 2018 – Weekend Subway Closures, Nathan’s Exec Holds a Trump Fundraiser, and More

There’s no L or G trains this weekend, the deadline to register to vote before the primaries is this weekend, Pom Pom the escaped chicken was returned to its Ditmas Park family, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Subway changes for the weekend include no L train between Brooklyn and Manhattan and no G train. Just about every line has some kind of service change, so plan accordingly and 6sqft has it outlined. Multiple streets throughout Brooklyn are closed this weekend for fairs, festivals and construction. BKLYNER has a guide to navigating your way topside.

This Sunday is the deadline to register to vote.

Take a look at NYC’s eats that made Lonely Planet’s top 500 foods in the world.

When New York initially dug out the subways, the question become “What are we gonna do with this dirt?” The answer was expand Ellis Island, multiple times.

Howard Lorber, executive chairman of Nathan’s is hosting a fundraiser tonight for president Trump.

The NY Times answers a few questions about the subway’s weirder quirks, like the extra platform at Hoyt Schemerhorn, changing directions at 86th St, and why Penn Station is so weird.

The Color Factory is the newest experiential NYC pop-up that wants your money and social media posts, but it still got a positive review in Curbed.

15 Brooklyn yeshivas have refused to let Department of Education personnel probe their inner workings for two years. The schools were being vetted for a lack of basic education.

The National Parks Service admits that it was a “misstep” denying two people access to the Statue of Liberty for wearing ABOLISH ICE shirts. They plan on returning to the landmark today.

Destination Tomorrow, a trans led organization, who’s leadership has roots in the former Bronx Community Pride Center, is now recognized as the official LGBTQ organization in The Bronx.

Window washers were rescued from the top of the United Nations building after being stranded up there for an hour.

New York University is offering free tuition for all of its medical students. It has raised about $450 million of the $600 million necessary to fund the moral imperative to cut student debt and reduce the coming shortage of researchers and primary care physicians.

A Staten Island team is competing in the Little League World Series and won the first game of the finals against Des Moines, Iowa’s team.

The mayor signed the trash equality bill into law, fixing the imbalance of garbage handled by low-income neighborhoods.

The Coney Island Circus Sideshow sold its one millionth ticket to the sideshow. The winning couple won free entry for life to the sideshow.

Lieutenant Governor candidate Jumaane Williams is having difficulties with reporters while he runs for office.

The escaped chicken in Ditmas Park, Pom Pom, is back with its family.


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